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Master databse role in SQL

When restoring databases with BackupExec, do I need to restore the master database when restoring other databses, or can it be left alone unless it is obviously corrupted or damaged in some way?

Come to that, how can I tell if the master datase is damaged? Indeed, what is its role in SQL?

I'm a newbie to SQL...
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Duncan Meyers
Asked:
Duncan Meyers
1 Solution
 
r_a_j_e_s_hCommented:
there is no need to restore master DB, these Db are given for ur references & making studies on various issues.
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NawalKishore1976Commented:
MAster Database contains the setting of the database,
the language setting tables etc.

No need to normally restore the master database.
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Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
>> When restoring databases with BackupExec, do I need to restore the master database when restoring other databases <<

No (agreeing with others).  In fact, you do *not* want to restore the master db unless you absolutely have to, because that would require restoring and recovering (if possible) the other dbs.


>> Come to that, how can I tell if the master datase is damaged? <<

Run this command (in Query Analyzer):  DBCC CHECKDB ('master')

The next-to-last line of the result should be:
"CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 0 consistency errors in database 'master'."

If the totals are not "0" and "0", then you have a problem :-) .


>> Indeed, what is its role in SQL? <<

It contains all information necessary to control the SQL Server instance, including some info on all of the other databases.  For example, master, but no other db, has:

1) a list of all dbs on the server with some info about each (sysdatabases)
2) info on current SQL activity (sysprocesses)
3) all SQL logins (syslogins)
4) all server configuration info (sysconfigures; entries include default language, min/max memory, etc. (for more info, in Books Online see topic "sp_configure" and choose the link to "Setting Configuration Options"))
5) performance info (sysperfinfo)

and more (for a complete list, see topic "master database", subtopic "information stored in system tables", and look at the first box titled "System Tables in the master Database Only")
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Duncan MeyersAuthor Commented:
Thanks! Very comprehensive answer.

I'm only involved with SQL for backup testing, hence my abject ignorance. Learning about SQL is on my 'to do' list (1,000,000 miles long and growing...)
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Duncan MeyersAuthor Commented:
ScottPletcher,
Do you want to post to this Q: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Databases/Microsoft_SQL_Server/Q_21425181.html?

You've answered my second question in this one, so you deserve the points :-)
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