Converting from a 300+ MB from Unix to Dos ...Hex values????

We have a Unix file . dat that is about 300+ MB...we are converting this to a DOS format (.txt) so that we can strip some values out of it....converting the flat files so we can  popped into a excel spreadsheet.

We are using UltraEdit  to open up a file  of this size...that isn't the problem ...when we opened it... we are getting HEX values ( I think!!)  scattered throughout the file itself.

Any way we can bring this file without the HEx values..

This is an example of the way the .txt file looks now.

 CORE CREDIT 15.°- ± 

 $Total tax 14.±

It seems some of the numbers are being substitued with HEx values.

Any help or insight would be great
nomar2Asked:
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jkrCommented:
Use

unix2dos <infile> <outfile>

on a UN*X box instead, that'll make life easier. Or, if you don't have that,

recode lat1:ibmpc  <infile> <outfile>

will do the job
nomar2Author Commented:
We ran

recode lat1:ibmpc  <infile> <outfile>  and that didn't seem to work.

We don't have access to a UNIX box anymore.

Any other way we can get this file cleaned up.

Your help is much appreciated.
jkrCommented:
You coould try ftp://ftp.externet.hu/pub/mirror/sac/utiltext/uddu.zip ("UNIX2DOS/DOS2UNIX Text Converter for Win32")

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nomar2Author Commented:
Oddly enough we have tried something very similar to that and that never worked.

We are stumped here ...

we want to convert this UNIX . dat file to a text file ...but we don't know what format the .dat file is in and as a result this is giving us a text file with HEX values.
jkrCommented:
Ah, now I get it - that is a binary file. Can you post the first two or four hex values that you get?
NovaDenizenCommented:
What unix application generated the .dat file?  Do you have documentation for this .dat file format?
jkrCommented:
Well, I was hoping to find out about that with the help of "magic", thus my request for the first few bytes :o)
MikeOM_DBACommented:

You cannot just convert a "binary" file from Unix to Dos unless you have information about that file.

For Binary files you need to know the correct data formatting (the meaning of the data and how it was written to the file) and the character encoding used by the creator application.

This is why jkr is asking for the first two bytes in order to check if they are recognized as belonging to a known application.

Good luck!
NovaDenizenCommented:
On the unix machine, run:
od -tx1 myfile.dat | head -10

That will give us the first couple hundred bytes of the file.
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