Reomve/Repair unsuccessful mkdev hd attempt

I've got a production server and I need to increase the storage capacity on it in order to hold us over until we replace the system in the off season.  Currently it's got a RAID 0+1 setup on a Compaq ML370 running SCO 5.0.6 IIRC, this drive has a boot partition and second partition called root.  The SCSI drives take up IDs 1-3 on ha 0, plus there's a second host adapter with a tape drive attached.

So far I've added another hard drive to the same SCSI bus as the RAID and went into the SCSI utilities to set it up.  It is now seen by the system on boot so my next step was to create the drive in UNIX, for this I used mkdev hd with the following parameters:

Option 2 for SCSI
Host Adapter prefix "cha"
Host Adapter 0
Bus 0
ID 4
LUN 0

I updated and relinked the kernal.  Next I rebooted and ran mkdev hd again and went through the same steps and selected the option to overwrite the drive, it's at this point that I get the following error:

/etc/fdisk: cannot open /dev/rdsk/1s0 for reading:  No such device or address <error 6>
/etc/fdisk failed.

I checked that the above file does not exist.

My searching of the internet led me to the following link:

http://aplawrence.com/Bofcusm/1256.html

I checked my /etc/conf/cf.d/mscsi file and noticed that the RAID set is on host adapter "ciss" and not "cha".  I manually changed the file and relinked teh kernel, rebooted and tried again but I still get the same error.

*ident @(#) mscsi 26.1 96/02/02
*
*       Copyright (C) 1988-1996 The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc.
*               All Rights Reserved.
*       The information in this file is provided for the exclusive use of
*       the licensees of The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc.  Such users have the
*       right to use, modify, and incorporate this code into other products
*       for purposes authorized by the license agreement provided they include
*       this notice and the associated copyright notice with any such product.
*       The information in this file is provided "AS IS" without warranty.
*
*       Scsi configuration master table
*
*       ha    = device name of SCSI host adapter driver e.g. ad
*       attach= device name of attached SCSI device driver e.g. Sdsk
*       number= host adapter number
*       ID    = controller number
*       lun   = logical unit number
*       bus   = host adapter bus number
*
*ha     attach  number  ID      lun     bus
*
wd      Srom    0       0       0       0
ciss    Sdsk    0       0       0       0
cha     Stp     1       2       0       0
ciss    Sdsk    0       4       0       0

Next I attempted to do thsi through SCOAdmin and before the above error it indicated that I had the wrong block size and that it needed to be betwteen 512 and 1024.

So, at this point I'm stumped.  Can I back out what I've done with mkdev and try it again using "ciss" instead of cha, or is there another configuration file I Can manually change to allow me to continue to get this drive on-line?

A sconf -v shows the following:

# sconf -v
Srom    wd      0       0       0       0
Stp     cha     1       0       2       0
unknown cha     1       0       2       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       0       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       1       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       2
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       3
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       4
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       5
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       6
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       2       7
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       2
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       3
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       4
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       5
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       6
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       3       7
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       2
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       3
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       4
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       5
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       6
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       4       7
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       2
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       3
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       4
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       5
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       6
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       5       7
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       2
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       3
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       4
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       5
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       6
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       6       7
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       0
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       1
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       2
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       3
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       4
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       5
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       6
Sdsk    ciss    0       0       7       7

TIA
TudAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

James0628Commented:
I'd try "mkdev .scsi" (note the period in front of scsi).  That gives you a different interface into the SCSI configuration and can help clean up problem configurations.  I haven't used OSR 5.0.6.  I'm assuming it still has that command.  Just be careful what you do in there.  Don't want to delete the wrong SCSI device, for example.  :-)

 Hope this helps.

 James

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
TudAuthor Commented:
I was able to remove it based on your settings.  I finally found out what I was doing wrong.  When setting it up the hard drive is on the same bus as a RAID set, and while the drive was at physical SCSI ID 4, the system sees it as being on ID 1.  I was hesitant to try ID 1 since in my mind SCSI IDs 0, 1, 2 and 3 were being used for the RAID.  Anyway, I was able to remove it and install it using ID 1 instead of 4 and all is well.
James0628Commented:
Glad I could help.

 I haven't used RAID much, so that different ID thing isn't something I would have guessed.  Glad you figured it out.

 James
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Unix OS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.