XP logon to W2003 server with domain name

Hello

Using XP as client and W2003 as server with domain name.
With XP, even when the machine is not physically hooked up to the network, XP would let you log in with network domain name as if you are currently connected to the network, I just wonder if anything can be done at XP level where it would prompt the user right at that moment to let the user know that the network is not available, and may be, it will force the user to log on locally?

Thanks very much
Tam
TranTOAsked:
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colin_harfordCommented:
You can use group policy and set the setting to cache 0 credentials, as such if the machine can't contact the DC, then it won't let them login to the domain.

CH
TranTOAuthor Commented:
Hi

Here is what I just did

Group Policy
Computer configuration
Administrative Templates
System
Logon
then I activated the setting "Always wait for teh network at computer startup and logon"

but so far not working like the way I was intended yet
Thanks
Tam


colin_harfordCommented:
I do it as part of my domain security policy (aka default domain policy), so if you load up on your dc, the mmc for domain security policy, you will find under

Local Policies/Security Options

Interactive Login

There is one called Number of previous logons to cache (in case domain controller is not available).


CH

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2hypeCommented:
colin harford is right, By Default Windows XP Chaches domain usernames/passwords.  Therefore, if the Domain is not avalible it can look to theses cache credentials and allow you to log on.  If you set it to 0, this will prevent windows xp from remebering domain username/password and therefore not allowing the user to logon to the domain when the server is down or the network connection is not avalible
TranTOAuthor Commented:
Hello

Thanks for the response, but I have the feeling we are not talking about the same thing here.

I have a laptop both configure to work either in office or home, my objective is when the laptop is using at home, if the user forget not to switch to local domain name and tried to log on as if the user is still in the office, XP will prompt "The system cannot log you on now becasue the domain <DOMAIN_NAME> is not available".

Currently even when the laptop is not physically connect to network, the logon screen at startup still let the user type in user name and password as if the laptop is connecting to the network, so I would think the settign if ti can be changed, it ahs to be at the laptop level not at server with domain controller?

Thanks
Tam
TranTOAuthor Commented:
Hello

My apology, for some reason, when talking about domain controller, I think of server level...but the setting is right her at XP level..thanks it's working as I intended

Tam
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