DMV databases?

jslayton01
jslayton01 used Ask the Experts™
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I have been listening to my local police on my scanner radio for years now since I am a "scanner freak". Since police have the authority to gain access to  someones DMV files by running the license plates and license number of course, it has to get it from a server or database program from  the DMV .

I have been always wondering about that. What Operating System or Server does the DMV use to store all of the DMV records and plates when police runs them through their dispatch center and then from the dispatch center they of course get the info from the DMV database? I know the dispatch uses the CAD System for emergencies and for other stuff. But what does the DMV use?

I have alot of guesses below and I need you to correct me if Im wrong (if someone knows):

IBM Mainframes running i5-OS, AIX, Linux...
iSeries AS/400 servers
Windows NT Server (which I doubt)
Novell NetWare
Windows running MySQL database
UNIX running ORACLE

Well, I have the my guesses above.

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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
This is going to depend on the DMV.  There are 50 in the united states (maybe 51 - not sure of the Washington DC area).  There's no reason they can't use any of these technologies at this point.  Personally, I would guess it would be Windows and MS SQL.   But it could just as easily be IBM and Oracle or DB2, Solaris and Oracle... or any major SQL compatible database system.  Some DMVs may still be running OLD systems, some may be running new systems.

It also depends on the databases used.  In this one link they talk of using FileMaker:
http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/pd/sbop/awards03/dmv5.pdf

North Dakota seems to be using Unisys (OS?) and Oracle
http://www.google.com/url?sa=U&start=5&q=http://www.covansys.com/media/press/current/2004_pr43.htm&e=912



Author

Commented:
Thanks. Keep them coming...

My guess they would use something like the AS/400 or IBM i5os or Linux/UNIX.
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
Unix yes, Linux... maybe, but to me, something tells me they wouldn't be savvy enough to do linux.  Solaris, sure, but Linux... not yet.  Then again, if the lowest bidder can do it that low because they use linux/MySQL, that's also possible.
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Author

Commented:
Are your saying that Linux is not secure in order for it to be used?

Author

Commented:
> Unix yes, Linux... maybe, but to me, something tells me they wouldn't be savvy enough to do linux.  Solaris, sure, but Linux... not yet.

The comment you wrote above, are you saying they would not use Linux because its not as secure as UNIX? Or, are you referring to something else like money wise or budget wise???

Please explain why.
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
Hardly, but I think linux is still seen in some areas - especially government - more of a novelty than a solution.  I don't work in government, so I can't be certain - and one states government can be very different from another.  But I try to keep up on things in the industry and I just don't hear of governments - in the US - using Linux - local, state, or federal.

Author

Commented:
What do mean by "Hardly"???

I dont quite understood that...

Is it because of weak security that they dont use Linux?
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process Advisor
Most Valuable Expert 2013

Commented:
I mean, in response to:
"Are your saying that Linux is not secure in order for it to be used?"

I'm hardly saying that (meaning, not intending to, don't agree with your assumption of my meaning).

Author

Commented:
Oh...Ok.

But, I do have a friend that works for the City as a Level-2 Computer Operations Manager. And there using SUSE Linux on the Mainframes like z/vm.

Anyway, I just wanted to know how the system works behind the curtain.

Author

Commented:
Now according to him, they keep the city's police records, jail records, and all of that on the z/vm running linux.
At one time the favorite database that IBM pushed was IMS.

There are millions of line of computer code in government systems
and there were many instances of local government getting
"ripped off" by contractors who couldn't deliver on their bid.

A long, long time ago we were at lunch on the beach in Hawaii
where our ship had stopped for the day.  Our host was an old
acquaintance from a think-tank job in Santa Barbara.  He told
us about brand new city computers sitting in a basement somewhere
because nobody knew how to make them work.
Top Expert 2014

Commented:
It depends on the state.  Last I knew most "large states" ran IBM mainframes and z/OS (a.k.a. MVS) using DB2.  I know that VA, MD, and Washington DC all used to run IBM Mainframe and z/OS.  Some DVM did not have their own computer system so they shared with another state agency. In a lot of states, a few agency would share mainframe to lower the costs.   Some of couse may be using IMS, either under z/OS or z/VM.

Washington DC did create a Web based front end, as has VA and MD, to their mainframe database, which is what the one PDF document refers to.

I do remember about one state recently having their court system migrating their application off of a shared mainframe running z/OS to Windows servers.  They were sharing a 5 MIP mainframe with other agencies and migrated their one application (was using less that 1 MIP on the mainframe) to six 8-way Wintel servers.

Some states, of course, could use "UNIX" (AIX, Solaris, or HP-UP) and DB2 or Oracle

It is possible that they some may have converted to MS SQL, but I would doubt it.  You have to remember that DMV databases pre-date MQ SQL, heck they pre-date Windows and government agencies are not know to migrate off things to quickly.

Also, there is NO IBM mainframe that runs i5 and no recent mainframe that run AIX (it been about 10 years since IBM tried to run AIX on a mainframe).  IBM mainframes only run z/OS, z/VM, z/VSE, TPF, and Linux.  The i5 (a.k.a. AS/400) is a midrange computer and the p5 is IBM's "Unix" box.  

I followed the link about Nevada and it mentions nothing about Unisys or Oracle.  In fact the link was referring to a voter registration system that had to link to their DMV system.

Commented:

 The one near where I live uses DEC equipment.
IBM iSeries AS/400 would be my guess. Its one of the most reliable. os/400 for the operating system. Database itself is probably something customize for the state most likely in SQL.


Joey
Commented:
check your state's job listing page. maybe you'll get lucky and they are hiring someone for IT in the DMV, or they have archived job descriptions. The skills required for the IT guy will likely find you your answer.

Author

Commented:
Do all of you know on where I can view this type of questions? Is there like another forum that I can go to regarding Government Computer Systems???

It would be interesting...

Author

Commented:
Goos Idea there....

I will do that...I will look up some of the IT jobs for the DMV.

Author

Commented:
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