Calculating inverse sin cos tan??

Hi, Just trying to make a basic trig program and have ran into a problem. How can you inverse a number in vb??

for example if i have a cosine of 0.707 i know using a calculater that the angle will be roughly 45 degrees. By using the acos(0.707) line of code which all .net help points to i get an answer of 0.7855492.

If anyone can point me in the right direction i'd be really gratefull. Thanks in advance.

Dave
Dave091277Asked:
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EdMarshCommented:
Hi Dave - The returned value is in radians - multiply by 57.29578 to get your figure in degrees.

acos(0.707) * 57.29578 = 45.0086...

HTH

Ed.
ptakjaCommented:
The trig functions in .NET all return angular values in RADIANS.

.7855492 Radians = about 45 degrees.
Harisha M GEngineerCommented:
Hi, I would leave the value of PI to be calculated internally...

MsgBox(Acos(0.707) * 180 / Pi())

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Harish

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ptakjaCommented:
To convert from radians to degrees:

Degrees = Radians * 180 / PI
Dave091277Author Commented:
Thanks alot!!!!!!!! That has been causing me grief all afternoon. Just one last query, where does that 57.29578 number come from?? What i mean is, have you just worked that out or is it a proper number like pi. Does that make sense?
Harisha M GEngineerCommented:
Dave091277,
>  Just one last query, where does that 57.29578 number come from?

180 / PI
Harisha M GEngineerCommented:
Actually, that should be 57.295779513082320876798154814105

So, I would stick onto

Acos(0.707) * 180 / Pi()
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