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FXO card not recognized by VMWare

eggster34
eggster34 asked
on
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Hi there
I have installed a new FXO card for Asterisk (it's basically a dial up modem.)

when I run kuzdu -p , I see it as:


class: MODEM
bus: PCI
detached: 0
driver: hisax
desc: "Tiger Jet Network Inc. Tiger3XX Modem/ISDN interface"
vendorId: e159
deviceId: 0001
subVendorId: 8086
subDeviceId: 0003
pciType: 1
pcidom:    0
pcibus:  0
pcidev:  c
pcifn:  0

how can I make sure the drivers for this are installed?





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Most Valuable Expert 2015

Commented:
If the hosting OS has the driver installed, that should be enough. Inside vmware you should be able to use the device as a network device. VmWare doesn't see connected devices directly.

Author

Commented:
I cannot see it as a network device though.
I have 2 ethernet cards and I can see those in vmware np. i.e. I can assign those cards to virtual machines on vmware, but I cannot seem to assign tis FXO card (modem) to vmware.
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Most Valuable Expert 2015

Commented:
Did you check the vmware site? there are also user groups there.

http://www.vmware.com/support/kb/enduser/std_alp.php?p_sid=5U1_*b*h&p_lva=&p_li=&p_page=1&p_prod_lvl1=%7Eany%7E&p_prod_lvl2=%7Eany%7E&p_search_text=modem&p_new_search=1&p_search_type=7&p_sort_by=dflt

Author

Commented:
ok let me ask it this way
I can add serial port devices to this virtual machine..
my modem is NOT a winmodem and is recognized by linux..
how can I check whcih COM port this modem is using in Linux? i.e. dev/ttys0 or ttys1 ?
> how can I check whcih COM port this modem is using in Linux? i.e. dev/ttys0 or ttys1 ?

Run "dmesg | less" and search (press / ) for "tty" then try to run AT commands on them via minicom.

Or maybe do something like this...

for TTY in /dev/ttyS*; do echo -e "\n---------------------\nTrying $TTY ..."; echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" > "$TTY" & PIDS=$! ; cat "$TTY" & PIDS=$PIDS\ $! ; sleep 2; kill -9 $PIDS > /dev/null 2>&1; done

Sample output of that mess I posted above:


---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS0 ...
[1] 18599
[2] 18600
[1]   Done                    echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS1 ...
[3] 18603
cat: /dev/ttyS1: Input/output error
[4] 18604
[2]+  Killed                  cat "$TTY"
[3]   Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[4]   Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS2 ...
[1] 18606
[2] 18607

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS3 ...
[3] 18610
[4] 18611
cat: /dev/ttyS3: Input/output error
[3]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[4]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttySL0 ...
[3] 18613
[4] 18614

ATZ
OK

ATI1
SmartLink Soft Modem, 2.9.10
Smart Link Ltd.
OK

Author

Commented:
I didn't understand..
when I do demsg | less and then type /tty

I get the tty words highlighted on these two lines and nothing else:

ttyS0 at I/O 0x3f8 (irq = 4) is a 16550A
ttyS1 at I/O 0x2f8 (irq = 3) is a 16550A

when I run the other command the output is like this:

[root@ns ~]# for TTY in /dev/ttyS*; do echo -e "\n---------------------\nTrying $TTY ..."; echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" > "$TTY" & PIDS=$! ; cat "$TTY" & PIDS=$PIDS\ $! ; sleep 2; kill -9 $PIDS > /dev/null 2>&1; done

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS0 ...
[1] 9074
[2] 9075
[1]-  Done                    echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Done                    cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS1 ...
[1] 9077
[2] 9078
[1]-  Done                    echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Done                    cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS2 ...
[1] 9080
[2] 9081
cat: /dev/ttyS2: Input/output error
[1]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS3 ...
[1] 9083
[2] 9084
cat: /dev/ttyS3: Input/output error
[1]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS4 ...
[1] 9086
[2] 9087
cat: /dev/ttyS4: Input/output error
[1]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS5 ...
[1] 9089
[2] 9090
cat: /dev/ttyS5: Input/output error
[1]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS6 ...
[1] 9092
[2] 9093
cat: /dev/ttyS6: Input/output error
[1]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

---------------------
Trying /dev/ttyS7 ...
[1] 9095
[2] 9096
cat: /dev/ttyS7: Input/output error
[1]-  Exit 1                  echo -e "\r\nATZ\r\nATI1\r\n" >"$TTY"
[2]+  Exit 1                  cat "$TTY"

what else should I do?
The tty device name may be named differently.

Try unplugging your card, then plugging it in again, and show us the output of the following command:

    dmesg | tail -n50

Author

Commented:
it's a PCI card..

Author

Commented:
[root@ns ~]# dmesg | tail -n50
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
Sorry, got this one confused with another question where it was a PCMCIA card.

Is the hisax driver loaded?

    lsmod | grep hisax
If it's not loaded, run:

    modprobe hisax
    dmesg | tail -n20
Commented:
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Author

Commented:
lsmod | grep hisax does not return any results:

[root@ns ~]# dmesg | tail -n20
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1043 -> 1001
/dev/vmmon[8721]: host clock rate change request 1001 -> 1043
CSLIP: code copyright 1989 Regents of the University of California
ISDN subsystem Rev: 1.1.2.3/1.1.2.3/1.1.2.2/1.1.2.3/1.1.2.2/1.1.2.2 loaded
HiSax: Linux Driver for passive ISDN cards
HiSax: Version 3.5 (module)
HiSax: Layer1 Revision 2.46.2.5
HiSax: Layer2 Revision 2.30.2.4
HiSax: TeiMgr Revision 2.20.2.3
HiSax: Layer3 Revision 2.22.2.3
HiSax: LinkLayer Revision 2.59.2.4
[root@ns ~]#
I haven't used ISDN before, but based on Google results it looks like ISDN devices are named like, for example, "/dev/ttyI0".

It seems like there should have been more kernel messages than what is shown.   Perhaps there would have been more messages if you waited several seconds between loading the driver and tailing dmesg.

You could try to "add" /dev/ttyI0 to the virtual machine, and see if that works.

If you want to try the card in Linux, you might want to start here:

    http://crashrecovery.org/isdn/i4l-howto-uk.html#TESTEN-KAART

Author

Commented:
this is not ISDN, this is a normal FXO card that's actually a dialup modem.

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