Configure FTP Server to Use Alternate Port

MattGreer
MattGreer used Ask the Experts™
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I am setting up a simple FTP server using IIS 5.0 on Windows 2000 Advanced Server.  It's a fresh install with no other software, IIS installed directly from the CD.  Using two computers on the same network, I check to see if I can log in to FTP on the server with WS_FTP Pro.  Works fine.  I'm told by my ISP that they filter port 21, so I must use port 25.  So I configure IIS to use port 25 using the IIS snap-in.  I reconfigure the FTP site in WS_FTP to use port 25 also.  I try to connect, and it appears to connect but then WS_FTP freezes.  I can't browse the directory and I have to ctrl-alt-del to shut down WS_FTP.

Something I notice while goofing around in the snap-in.  There seems to be another place to set the port number.  When I right click on computer name in the snap-in, I can bring up the Master Properties for the FTP service and there's the port number, greyed out (I cannot edit it), and it's set to 21.

Questions:
How can I set up IIS to work correctly using port 25, rather than port 21?
How will a general FTP client know to use port 25?  Do I need to inform my users that they must use port 25 in their FTP client?
In order to disable anonymous login, I must create local accounts on the server, correct?  (This is a standalone server that will just maintain FTP, nothing else, i.e. no Active Directory, no Domain Controller, just FTP.)




Thanks!

Matt
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Commented:
In my personal opinion, the Microsoft implementation of an FTP server is very, very poor.  Adding multiple users with permissions to varying folders (etc, etc) gets tricky very quickly.  I've been running FTP servers for about 10 years now and I cringe with the Microsoft version comes into play.

Here are some alternate suggestions:
- Filezilla Server (free)
  http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=21558
- G6FtpServer (not free, but very good)
  http://www.gene6.com/

If you don't use the MS version of FTP, then you can uninstall IIS completely and just have a 3rd party FTP server running -- like one of the ones I suggested.

Trust me -- you'll be happy you switched!!

Chumplet

Commented:
As for the "port 25" stuff, well... if you installed the SMTP component with IIS, then you'll be running into a port conflict since SMTP runs on port 25 by default!  In fact, I'm VERY surprised that your ISP would recommend port 25 for anything other than SMTP.  Very surprising, indeed!  Again, moving away from the Microsoft FTP (and uninstalling IIS) should clear up and SMTP/Port25 conflicts that you may have.

To your other questions:
- Yes... the ftp clients will need to know what port FTP is now running on
- Yes... you will need to create "local" user accounts for the FTP server clients to use

If you're using a 3rd party FTP client, however, you can create users within that application itself -- so you are NOT creating local user accounts on the server at all.  That's a GOOD thing!  You can also get much more specific about folder rights, virtual directories, quotas, user account expirations, and so on.

Chumplet

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Commented:
With Filezilla, doesn't the client need to be running the Filezilla client, or can they use any FTP program they want?


As it turns out, comcast apparently does not block port 21, so when I switched it back and tested it it's working now.  I've also noticed in my reading that it's not just port 21 that's needed.  Port 20 is somehow used also.

Any recommendations on 'required reading' for FTP?
Commented:
This is a good article on the basics of FTP...
http://www.ftpx.com/allaboutftp.htm

Anyhow, I'm glad to hear that your FTP server is up and running.  I still highly recommend a 3rd party FTP program, like FileZilla Server, but that's up to you.  You do NOT need to use FileZilla (client) to connect to it.  Any client will do.

As for the ports, well.... "typically" you'll find that port 21 is used for the commands, while port 20 is used for data -- but this is not always the case.  Another good read would be...
http://slacksite.com/other/ftp.html

Hope that helps!

Chumplet

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