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Server Authentication

I have a Windows AD network spread across three buildings about 300 feet apart. It is one flat AD domain. There is a Windows 2003 server in each building and they are all domain controllers. For some reason when several workstations log in they are running the login script from the netlogon directory on one of the servers in the other building. I would have assumed that since they each have a server in their respective building that their "home" server would be where the login script is ran. Do I have something set up wrong? Is their any way to specify which server is the workstations "home" server?

I am monitoring the network with 3Com Network Director and the only errors I get (on rare occassion) is the the DNS response time is high on these domain controllers. Any ideas?  
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jimbecher
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jimbecher
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TheCleanerCommented:
If the network is a flat layer 2 network (all one subnet) then the workstations will simply broadcast for a domain controller to authenticate them and the first one to respond back and negotiate the login will be the DC it goes with.

If you want to force the DCs in the respective buildings to be the ones that authenticate for that building then you will need to create different subnets for those buildings and use Active Directory Sites and Services to segment out the subnets with their respective building DCs.  Don't forget you'll need routing capabilities between the buildings/subnets at that point.
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TheCleanerCommented:
Thanks for the quick points...happy to help out.
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jimbecherAuthor Commented:
Well worth the answer. Thanks!
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