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Standard Web Page Size

Posted on 2006-03-20
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Two questions that I need answered ASAP:

1) Is the "standard" web page width 760px?

2) What is the "standard" size (both height and width) for splash pages?
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Question by:thespiceman
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by:rockymagee
ID: 16239277
This is where I go to view stats for the interweb ...

http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_stats.asp

It looks like 1024 is in the running  @ 57% and 800 is in the running @ 20%

As for Flash ....should not really matter because it will scale to fit your browser page.
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by:esw074
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There's no "standard", per se.  Your design should accommodate any user, regardless of screen resolution.

Now, having said that, usage statistics will show that the most common screen resolutions are 800x600 and 1024x768.  Under most circumstances, a page width of 760px will accommodate most users.  The best practice is to design for everyone, but there are obviously some practical limitations.

> This is where I go to view stats for the interweb ...

I think those are just stats for the w3schools site, which is probably representative of developers, but not necessarily the public at large.  

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by:Tomeeboy
Tomeeboy earned 600 total points
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That's a good link that Rocky posted and it should give you a great idea of how you should design your sites.  I typically make sure my sites fit inside of a maximized web browser on a display using 800 x 600 resolution.  As you can see from the stats on the above page, about 20% of people are still using this resolution, which I think is a large enough number to take into consideration.  In addition, just because somebody is running 1024 x 768 or higher doesn't mean they want to have their web browser taking up the entire screen (I know I wouldn't), and this is something else I take into consideration.  If you can fit your content within a width such as 760px, then that is probably a safe option to go with.  You can choose to have a wider design, but I wouldn't put anything crucial on the far right side.  You may also want to look into a design that resizes to fit the browser (this site uses that technique, and does it fairly well).
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mrichmon earned 800 total points
ID: 16239553
I agree - there is no standard.  You should design flexible pages.

See these articles:
How can I make my pages look good on all monitors?
http://www.thepattysite.com/window_sizes1.cfm

Which screen resolution should you design your page for?
http://www.dwfaq.com/Tutorials/Tables/flexible_tables.asp



Splash screens in general should not be large.  They should be simple and not busy and get to the point.  It is really an advertisement before the main site.  IN general it shoudl fit centered on a 800x600 screen.

That being said I don't like splash screens - they chase more people away because it takes more clicks to find what they were actually coming to your site for...
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by:Tomeeboy
ID: 16239741
I'd agree with mrichmon about the splash screens.  A noticeable amount of users will close the page rather than click the link to skip the splash screen if they don't want to see it.  However, this also depends on the type of site you are running.  If you're keeping people from quickly getting to content or information they need, then splash screens are a bad idea.  If your splash screen, IS part of your content (example: you're a designer and it shows off your flash skills, etc.), then it might not be such a bad idea.
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by:SunBow
ID: 16240003

> 1) Is the "standard" web page width 760px?

No. No such 'standard'. I agree a little with esw074: "800x600 and 1024x768" adding 1280x1024.

You should consider your intended audience, and make it as small (fewer pixels) as you can. If you have pictures, same rules go: 256 is enough, don't overdo it unless critical.

> 2) What is the "standard" size (both height and width) for splash pages?

Same answer. You can go smaller, less pixels, than 800x600, but there's no point to that anymore.

Developers should ever beware that the users just may not have the most up to date hardware that they do, and if something don't work, such as an incomplete window that a user cannot scroll to see the rest of (or doesn't want to) their product won't sell.
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