• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 417
  • Last Modified:

Computer Won't Boot Past BIOS Screen

My computer starts up and then on the BIOS screen, it usually lists temperature, and some other physical information about the computer and then it boots up from there.  This isn't on the POST screen, it's before that.

Sometimes the computer will come up and it will list ?? as the temperature and won't boot up.  Any ideas on what I might try to find out why it is doing this?  I know it's probably a bad part, but I don't want to replace the motherboard, processor and HD if I can avoid it.  Any suggestions on what part may be going bad?
0
concertpianist
Asked:
concertpianist
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • +3
1 Solution
 
CallandorCommented:
Possibly you have a bad CMOS battery, which is a coin-shaped object on the motherboard.  Your disk geometry is saved by this when power is turned off.  You could also have a bad power supply.  Swap another unit in its place.
0
 
aindelicatoCommented:
Check your fans and make sure they are clean and working.

More than likely, the MB has a bad temp sensor.

Whats the Brand/Model of the MB, you may be able to turn off the HALT ON ERROR option, which would allow the PC to continue booting.
0
 
concertpianistAuthor Commented:
As far as the MB brand, I'm not sure and I'm afraid to open the case because when I shut down the computer totally is when it usually happens.  When I warm boot, it seems to be fine.

I will look for the Halt on error option in the BIOS setup and find out if I can turn it off.  I'm at work right now, so I will have to try it when I get home.

I will also see if I can find the mfg and model from Windows.

As far as the battery, that would be a good idea, but I would like to take that as a last resort because if I power down the computer, it may not start up again :)

Any other suggestions are welcome as well... I'd like to have as many as I can because I hate not being able to boot up!
0
Reclaim your office - Try the MB 660 headset now!

High level of background noise often makes it difficult for employees to concentrate fully on their jobs – or to communicate clearly on calls. The MB 660 headset helps you create a disruption free workspace.  

 
CallandorCommented:
If it behaves differently on warm boots versus cold, that points to a capacitor problem, either in the power supply or on the motherboard.  You can sometimes visually detect bad capacitors by the bulge in the top or discolored material around it: www.badcaps.net
0
 
FermionCommented:
Callandor: This is a little off post, but thanks for bringing the issue of bad capacitors to my attention. Whether or not that issue is specific to the posters problem, it certainly seems to be an issue worth considering elsewise. Thanks for providing an informative link.
0
 
CallandorCommented:
Fermion,

That's a great thing about this site - you can learn a lot from others, whether you contribute a lot or not.
0
 
willcompCommented:
Try installing Everest Home.  It will provide info about your system and also sensor output.

http://www.majorgeeks.com/download4181.html

Specifics regarding motherboard may help.

Although bulging or leakage is a sure sign of a faulty capacitor, they can and do fail with no apparent external signs of damage.
0
 
cyan990Commented:
Hi,

Have you considered upgrading the BIOS?

Cyan990
0
 
concertpianistAuthor Commented:
Motherboard is Jetway V2MDMP/V4MDM/V4MDMP.

The sensor readout is as follows:

--------[ Sensor ]------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sensor Properties:
      Sensor Type                                       ITE IT8712F  (ISA 290h)

    Temperatures:
      Motherboard                                       36 °C  (97 °F)
      CPU                                               8 °C  (46 °F)
      Aux                                               47 °C  (117 °F)
      Seagate ST340015A                                 33 °C  (91 °F)

    Cooling Fans:
      CPU                                               3516 RPM

    Voltage Values:
      CPU Core                                          1.57 V
      +2.5 V                                            2.43 V
      +3.3 V                                            3.28 V
      +5 V                                              4.92 V
      +12 V                                             11.90 V
      +5 V Standby                                      4.70 V
      VBAT Battery                                      2.85 V
      Debug Info F                                      30 FF FF
      Debug Info T                                      47 36 08
      Debug Info V                                      62 98 CD B7 BA C8 41 (F7)
0
 
willcompCommented:
Looks like the CPU temperature sensor is highly suspect.  Aux sensor may actually be CPU temp.  47 degrees C is normal for a P4.

Battery voltage is a bit low.  I like to replace when voltage drops below 2.95VDC.  You can check with a voltmeter to be sure reading is correct.

Check temperatures and voltages reported in BIOS setup as well (usually under Hardware Health category).

You may well have a faulty sensor that is causing problems and need to disable CPU temperature permissive in BIOS.
0
 
concertpianistAuthor Commented:
willcomp:

I disabled halt on error in the BIOS.  I'm not quite sure what to look for on the CPU temperature permissive in the BIOS.  Can you suggest what to look for?  Or will it actually say "Temperature permissive"?
0
 
CallandorCommented:
It's probably in the power section of the BIOS, or alerts - mine is called temperature alert.
0
 
concertpianistAuthor Commented:
I am checking into this later today.  I did a little tweaking last night, but didn't get very far.  I will update later tonight or tomorrow.  Thanks to all who commented already.  More suggestions are always welcome!
0

Featured Post

 The Evil-ution of Network Security Threats

What are the hacks that forever changed the security industry? To answer that question, we created an exciting new eBook that takes you on a trip through hacking history. It explores the top hacks from the 80s to 2010s, why they mattered, and how the security industry responded.

  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • +3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now