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JavaMail Vs Other mail compatibles

Why do people use JavaMail instead of other mail compatibles such
as .NET components (.NET mailing features)..

Or do people use .NET more?

What other easy to implement mail protocols are there?
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jedistar
Asked:
jedistar
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2 Solutions
 
CEHJCommented:
Well you'd have to be running Windows on your server for one thing - not a good idea ;-)
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CEHJCommented:
'have to be' is not strictly correct, but practicably so
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
Because Java is platform independent - you can use the same code and deploy it on any platform. The exchange-server can be a Microsoft exchange server or any other mail-server. The .NET code that you write will work with any mail-server but the code can be deployed on only Windows platform, unless you're using one of the 3rd party .NET implementations for Linux/ Mac like Mono (not recommended as they are not tried and tested).
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
>> Or do people use .NET more?

That's a larger question which can be answered on the basis of 'is .NET used more than Java?' The answer which most M$ fans believe in is yes. But the actual answer is no because .NET works on only Windows and maximum deployment servers in this world are not Windows (I'm not talking about development systems). Also - Java/ J2EE/ J2ME are older, bigger and more extensible than .NET standard/ compact frameworks, with many more uncountable production deployments (you don't think software companies made money out of nothing before .NET came up, and you don't think they doubled or tripled their revenues in 2-3 years after .NET came up just because of .NET). New stuff like Struts, etc keep coming up to which .NET really doesn't have an answer.

We've had many discussions on EE regarding this - a long one is posted here (also has links to many articles on the Net).

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Q_20816080.html

Anyway, let's not start off that debate :) this Q is about Javamail. And well - the answer is Java-mail is used wherever Java is used, because you want platform-independency while running your code.
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CEHJCommented:
Actually, re-reading my comment, it's a bit misleading. JavaMail is largely mail *client* software, practically speaking, although it can be used in mail servers.

Not sure on the statistics of mail client software, other than to say that the use of any *already written* clients other than Microsoft's is probably too insignificant to count
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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
>> other than to say that the use of any *already written* clients other than Microsoft's is probably too insignificant to count

Don't forget Lotus and the others :) anyway that is because most of the users (not developers) in this world use Windows. However, let's not mislead by talking about only mail-clients. The mail API is used in applications too, and when it comes to applications, we know Java almost leads the way now :)
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CEHJCommented:
>>anyway that is because most of the users (not developers) in this world use Windows

Yes

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Mayank SAssociate Director - Product EngineeringCommented:
Unfortunately. (So do I)
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objectsCommented:
JavaMail is the standard *Java* api for handing mail
.NET components are primarily intended for use by .NET applications.
You could interchange if you wanted but its just making more work for yourself.
Using a different implementation of the protocols is also an option, but again for developing Java an impleemntation with a Java API would be far easier to use for Java development.
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CEHJCommented:
:-)
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