Automatic shutdown for multiple PCs

I have 52 Windows XP PCs that are in common areas in my office and they get left on for days at the time.  The people that use these PCs are supposed to shut them down, but of course, they don't.  Is there anyway to setup a scheduled task to shut down the computer, or is there a better way to do that?

Thanks,
Tom
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toc-tomAsked:
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BrentxhangeCommented:
You could try RShutDown2 at "http://assarbad.org/stuff/rshutdown2.zip"

You will have to make a text document with all the computer names that you want to shutdown, then put that and the RShutDown2 in the same folder.

Next make a batch file and type RShutdown2 /shutdown :"message(if u want 1" /file computers.txt(or the name of ur txt file with the computer in it) /XXXX (# of seconds)

eg.

Rsshutdown /shutdown :"This computer is scheduled to in 1 minute.  Please save all of your work." /file computers.txt /60

You would schedule the .bat file to run at a certain time every day on a single computer in your office
 (preferrably on that stays on all the time)

The download has all the needed help files.

Let me know if this helps.
nikpeglerCommented:
Create a batch file that uses the incorporated WinXP shut down command (syntax below).  Once you have the batch file, set up task scheduler to execute the batch nightly at say, 7 or 8 pm?  Syntax is as follows for the batch file:

SHUTDOWN -S -T 05

Where the number after -t is the time in seconds before shut down. It cannot be set to zero as far as I know.

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ian_chardCommented:
Set up a scheduled task at a time that you see convenient that just runs the following (which you'll need to put in a batch file)

shutdown /f /s

It's probably better to look at the shutdown help in dos to see what extra things you may want, like comments to give the users a few minutes to save their work if they are still logged on, etc, but this will definitely work. You'll need the /f (f for Force) to force applications like Outlook to exit.
ian_chardCommented:
Nikpegler....great minds think alike eh?

;o)

Cheers
Ian
nikpeglerCommented:
yea ian. I used that batch file numerous times when my roomates' little brother was staying with us for the summer. He kept being late for work because he was up all night playing on the computer.  I used the -t tag to give him a little warning (5 seconds). I only used so little time because he knew how to stop it, just not that quickly.  Gave him time to say bye to one of his chat buddies. That in addition with an auto-expiring BIOS password kept him in line as far as the computer went.
ian_chardCommented:
LOL! Good move! I've used it here on one of the other administrators machine who has a tendency to play solitaire rather than do any work...I replaced the solitaire shortcut with a new one that looked like it pointed to solitaire but actually pointed to a shutdown batch file, then told him that sol.exe was corrupt and the machine would restart in 30 seconds...took him ages to find out what was going on! LOL!
toc-tomAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the answers.  I like using the shutdown file already included with Windows.  I wish there was a way to remotely shut down each PC from the server but in my testing I have found that since the users don't logon to the domain I don't have access to shut them down from the server.
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