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Can my PC handle a chip increase from 1.8 to 2.7Ghz?

Hey All,

I have a Dell Dimension 2350 with a 1.8 Ghz processor that I bought back about two years or so ago. It was a 1.6Ghz, but that crapped out and I got a new chip. A buddy of mine is tossing his 2400 Dimension which houses a 2.7ghz chip. Pretend I don't know anything, but based on how I was able to swap out my defective 1.6 for the 1.8, and assume that the chip does fit into the processor bay, what damage can be done by bumping me up to the 2.7 Ghz? I'd use the same heat sink to keep it cool and I'd monitor the inside temperature. Can this be done? All chips were Intel P4

Please let me know.

Thanks!

PJS
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pstiffsae
Asked:
pstiffsae
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3 Solutions
 
Intense_AngelCommented:
depends on your motherboard.  You won't kill it, you will only run at the speed the motherboard is capable of running at.  So...if it fits it will work, or not start up, or run at a lower speed.

If it does run at a lower speed you should check for a bios update....well actually you should even if it works at normal speed.
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CallandorCommented:
You probably won't be able to do it.  The P4 1.6 and 1.8 have a 100FSB, and the fastest one runs at 2.0GHz.  I doubt Dells let you adjust the FSB manually, and you will need a 133FSB to handle it.  However, you might be able to transport the entire motherboard with the cpu, since it already supports the cpu.  You will need to check if your RAM is fast enough, becuase you will need PC2700 or better to run at full speed.
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Craig321Commented:
Nothing will be harmed, as said above it'll just run at a lower speed / not run at all.

Craig.
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pstiffsaeAuthor Commented:
So, essentially, even putting in the new chip, I probably won't notice a difference performance wise of a great magnitude.
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Craig321Commented:
All depends if the motherboard/bios can handle the clock speed, if it can't and it still boots then you probably won't see a huge speed increase if you do at all.
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CallandorCommented:
To be exact, if it runs at 100FSB instead of 133FSB, it will be running at 75% of the rated speed, or about 2.1GHz.
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nikpeglerCommented:
BTW, according to the dell website, the Dimension 2350 is capable of up to a 400 MHz FSB and capable of up to a 2.5 GHz Processor at that FSB.  So he'd be able to handle the clock speed, but it would only detect as a 2.5 GHz.

Niklaus.
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Craig321Commented:
200mhz hardly noticeable, so then if the above is correct it should all be fine :-)
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pstiffsaeAuthor Commented:
Well, the system didn't boot. Turned on and ran through the drives and just kinda hung there. Put the other chip back in, worked fine. Any suggestions on getting around it to make that other chip work?
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CallandorCommented:
What speed is your RAM rated for?  And are you certain the new chip is a P4 2.7, and not a Celeron?  A Celeron 2.7 will attempt to run at 2.7 and will probably fail.
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nikpeglerCommented:
Good point Callandor.  I didn't think to check that.
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