?
Solved

What is the best solution to enable two or more completely separate internal networks, to securely share the same broadband connection?

Posted on 2006-03-30
10
Medium Priority
?
209 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-16
What is the best solution to enable two or more completely separate internal networks, to securely share the same ADSL based broadband connection?

For example, often it is desirable for there to be one high specification broadband connection installed into a large building, but where the individual departments or users within that building, need to then be on completely separate internal networks. Each separate department or user therefore would need to be able to access the Internet and possibly their own system remotely, without there being a security risk posed by the computers effectively being linked ( albeit loosely ) together.

The users in this scenario would either have simple Windows peer to peer, or Windows server based, networks.

What would therefore be the most viable way forward, without purchasing a prohibitively expensive IT solution.
0
Comment
Question by:itcroydon
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • +1
9 Comments
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 16337397
Two or more separate subnets should do the trick. So at the front end, some sort of multiple-interface router to define out all of these networks that you're mentioning. So you might take the 10.x.x.x network and break it down as you need it to be broken down.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:itcroydon
ID: 16337444
Any suggestions on a suitable multiple-interface router?
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:masnrock
ID: 16339520
Just curious, what network infrastructure do you have in place already? Might as well try to stay consistent with the same vendor, unless you're trying to switch?
0
 The Evil-ution of Network Security Threats

What are the hacks that forever changed the security industry? To answer that question, we created an exciting new eBook that takes you on a trip through hacking history. It explores the top hacks from the 80s to 2010s, why they mattered, and how the security industry responded.

 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:itcroydon
ID: 16340174
We will effectively work from a 'clean sheet' in this case, although we would want to use market leading equipment, possibly Cisco, Dlink, Netgear etc.
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:arvind
ID: 16340328
here is the best solution for your network

http://www.xincom.com/twinwan.html

0
 
LVL 32

Assisted Solution

by:masnrock
masnrock earned 600 total points
ID: 16341157
Well, because you said a large building, maybe a Cisco 800 or 18000 series router would work? Both of those have models where your incoming connection can be ADSL. You should be able to configure any of these with NAT. Assuming you can't get as many subnets are you're looking for, you can always drop in additional cards or routers later (in a cascading fashion).
0
 
LVL 79

Accepted Solution

by:
lrmoore earned 1400 total points
ID: 16350384
One potential solution would be to use a Cisco switch with Private VLANs.
Here's a low-end 8 port switch that could be a possible solution:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps5213/products_qanda_item09186a00801973dd.shtml

You could have a single public IP subnet, providing each tenant their own subset of IP's and their own PVLAN. The router is in a 'community' vlan so that all private VLANS can get out the router.

One a higher-end more scalable side, you can use a 4500 series chassis switch with full Layer3 capabilities so that you can give each PVLAN their own public IP subnet. Now you have both layer 2 and layer 3 separation between clients.

Not sure of your definition of prohibitively expensive...
A much less expensive solution would be to give each client their very own $50 Linksys/Dlink router, all of their routers connect to your switch. Let their routers do all the heavy work like NAT and firewall:

      s w i t c h  --> router -->DSL----> Internet
   |    |    |      |
 R1  R2   R3    R4

Each router gets it's own public IP address from you, and the clients control what ports they want to forward to their internal network.

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:itcroydon
ID: 16535745
Sorry for the delay in responding to the above comments...

When you mention that "each router gets it's own IP address from you" are you referring to allocating a fixed 192.168.X.X IP address for each router and then installing an Ethernet based router in each office with the relevant DNS settings to achieve an Internet Connection ( i.e. in a similar way to configuring a static IP address on a workstation PC ), or are you suggesting having a block of external IP addresses 212.231.16.X from the ISP and allocating each Internal router a fixed external IP address ( if so,would a standard router facilitate this? )  
0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 16536699
>are you suggesting having a block of external IP addresses 212.231.16.X from the ISP and allocating each Internal router a fixed external IP address ( if so,would a standard router facilitate this? )  
Yes, this option.
Yes, most any router would facilitate this along with a switch to provide connectivity to the clients.

Internet feed --public IP--> router --public IP block-->switch----->router-1
                                           ^                                    |           WAN inteface gets public IP from you
                                      Router mode                        |          LAN interface can be default private IP
                                     Not Gateway Mode             Router-n
                                      No NAT, just pass
                                      traffic from Inet feed to switch
                                                                             
0

Featured Post

Rewarding opportunities for women in IT

Across the nation, technology jobs are vacant because there aren’t enough qualified professionals to fill them. With a degree from WGU, you can get the credentials it takes to become an in-demand IT professional. Plus, WGU’s IT programs include industry certifications.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

As managed cloud service providers, we often get asked to intervene when cloud deployments go awry. Attracted by apparent ease-of-use, flexibility and low computing costs, companies quickly adopt leading public cloud platforms such as Amazon Web Ser…
In this article, the configuration steps in Zabbix to monitor devices via SNMP will be discussed with some real examples on Cisco Router/Switch, Catalyst Switch, NAS Synology device.
As a trusted technology advisor to your customers you are likely getting the daily question of, ‘should I put this in the cloud?’ As customer demands for cloud services increases, companies will see a shift from traditional buying patterns to new…
When cloud platforms entered the scene, users and companies jumped on board to take advantage of the many benefits, like the ability to work and connect with company information from various locations. What many didn't foresee was the increased risk…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month16 days, 7 hours left to enroll

850 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question