Replacing a 2000 AD/DNS server with 2003 server and keep same name.

Would like to replace the 2000 server (srv1)which is a GC/AD/FSMO and Dns (active directory intergrated as well as other domains) server. We also have one other 2003 server(srv2) which is a GC, I understand the need to dcpromo and make the new one a GC,  but have questions:
1. Would like to rename the new server(srv3) to the same as srv1 because that hardware is going away and because of dns, is that a problem?
2. Can I transfer the FSMO roles to the new server before the name change? Thank You.
raindaveAsked:
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
So you already have a 2003 Domain Controller, right?  

1. Transfer the FSMO, DNS, GC, etc to the existing 2003 DC.  
2. Then demote the old 2000 server.  
3. Then remove it from the network and reset the computer account in Active Directory Users and Computers.
4. Then rename the new server to the old server's name.
5. Then add the new server to the network.
6. Then run DCPROMO and Make it a domain controller.  
7. Then transfer the services you want it to run back to it.
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raindaveAuthor Commented:
Yes I have a existing 2003 DC(srv2), the new server(srv3) is already a member server. Should I drop it out of the domain then?
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NJComputerNetworksCommented:
In case there are left over symptoms of the old DC being in your AD environment still, you can use this procedure to verify that the server has been removed:  http://www.petri.co.il/delete_failed_dcs_from_ad.htm

After you validate, you can coninue with adding the new server as a domain controller.

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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
NJ... No DC has failed.  If he runs DCPROMO and removes it properly, this should be entirely unnecessary.

I would remove the 3rd system from the domain and rename it outside the domain - it may work just fine renaming if from within the domain, but I this is what *I* would do.  And ONLY rename it after you have properly removed the old server1
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NJComputerNetworksCommented:
Leew your right...  You don't "have" to do this.  However, if your environment is not working properly (say DNS is pointed wrong) and you have trouble with the DCPROMO, you may refer to the document to manually remove the DC (or check the verify that the DC has been removed from AD.)

Sorry to confuse you, my post was only included as additional information.
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raindaveAuthor Commented:
When we do the dcpromo, will it automatically get the Active Directory intergrated zone?
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NJComputerNetworksCommented:
yes
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