Windows 2000 and sandisk 12 in 1

Is there any way to get a sandisk 12 in one reader to work without the user having software install rights?  

I'm a network admin and don't allow users to install software on their own.  I have tried to install the drivers for the 12 in 1 reader, and it works well when I'm logged in as the administrator, but not when the user is logged in.  The link to the product is below:

http://www.sandisk.com/Products/Item(1145)-SDDR-89-SanDisk_ImageMate_12in1_ReaderWriter.aspx
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npinfotechAsked:
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Jay_Jay70Commented:
Hi npinfotech,

isnt the sandisk virtually a plug and play product?   whats the error you get?

Cheers!
npinfotechAuthor Commented:
The error comes in when the memory in the card reader has to be ejected.  The instructions say "open 'my computer', right click on the drive that has the card in it, select the 'eject' option, then remove the card from the slot".  I can do it fine when i'm logged into the PC as myself (administrator).  When I log in as the user, the eject option doesn't work.  I forget the actual error message.  The user has no local machine rights.  I do not want this or any other use to be able to install software on the PCs they are using.  
Jay_Jay70Commented:
you may need to try slightly elevated priviliges rather than the the standard user   as it obivoulsy does not work    you can try a power users group but im pretty sure that gives them enough rights to install as well - not sure exactly
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ShanidarCommented:
You could try finding the device inside the HKLM of the registry, and elevating the user rights at that level.  Use Regedit to find the device and the Permissions menu to give All Users-> Special Access. That may do the trick.

Good Luck
npinfotechAuthor Commented:
"You could try finding the device inside the HKLM of the registry, and elevating the user rights at that level.  Use Regedit to find the device and the Permissions menu to give All Users-> Special Access. That may do the trick."

Would this allow the user to install programs on their PC?
ShanidarCommented:
No, the user would not gain the right to install software.  That level of rights is controlled at a higher level, like the power user.  It is important to grant the "Special Access" at the lowest level that is effective.  The lower the level, ie, deeper into the registry, the more you can control the access and prevent the users from hosing the machine.

Go ahead and test that, and report back

Good Luck

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Windows 2000

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