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What is NCS palette

Can someone explain to me (not links please) briefly what is the NCS palette? I know it's some form of colour reference but what form and how is it used and is it regarded as the standard world reference?
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Jason210
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Jason210
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
N)atural C)olor S)ystem
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
I'm going to put a link here because it includes graphics to help visually explain
http://www.ncscolour.com/webbizz/mainPage/pageTemplates/Product.asp?linkSource=menu&pageID={22614264-4200-4E07-BF79-85265C798317}&menuID={D18782B7-7031-4008-A233-EB4748A9B3BA}&aspTpl=Product.asp

plus Experts Exchange doesn't want a copy & paste of copyrighted material.
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neopolitanCommented:
It is easy to look in to the following links than describing the whole here; also the colour system cannot be represented in the web format of EE.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_Color_System

Normal eyes can see about 10 million colours. To identify the colours and to communicate, a standard was specified called Natural Colour System (NCS).
 It is a logical colour notation system which describes the colour on visual properties. It starts with six pure elementary colours,  four chromatic elementary colours ( blue, green, yellow and red)  and two non-chromatic elementary colours (white  and black). All other colours are described in NCS colour notation in terms of their degree of visual resemblance to these elementary colours(alone or combination of elementary colours).
It is proprietary, and Scandinavian in conception, though accepted internationally.
http://www.ncscolour.com/webbizz/mainPage/main.asp
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Jason210Author Commented:
What I don't get is that in order to represent a colour, you need a reference datum of some kind. Like a Pantone guide (that's what I'm used to). The pre-requisite of a reference is that it is defineble, and can be reproduced. Just like a metre measurement is the length of some metal rod at a certain temperature or whatever.

The reference for Pantone's printers guides are pantone pigments, that are manufactured and mixed according to precise forumlae. Similarly, coloured light can be defined by specific wavelengths. But it  seems that NCS is founded on a wholly different concept, and it's this that I don't understand, and would like some help with.
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
I believe you have to look at it two ways as it depends on the medium of output... for example...

displaying colors to the computer screen with NCS, would be more applicable

versus

printing in color using Pantone
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Irwin SantosComputer Integration SpecialistCommented:
@venabili..my comments & neopolitan comments answer the questions directly split points grade A
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neopolitanCommented:
I agree with irwinpks.
Cheers.
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Jason210Author Commented:
I'll do it then, since no-one else seems to have a better answer. I'm still as confused as ever though!
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Jason210Author Commented:
The reason I left it open was to invite more answers. You can't have a colour scheme without having some form of master reference somwhere!
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