Pattern recognition

I'm looking into the possibility of working with pattern recognition.  Is this a possibility in access?  If not would I be better off working with C derivitives?  Can anyone point me to some resources on pattern recognition?

FNBGPPL
LVL 1
fnbgpplAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

thenelsonCommented:
RegExpr support for VBA: http://www.ezgoal.com/visualbasic/codes/f.asp?fid=9200

From VBA help:

Built-in pattern matching provides a versatile tool for making string comparisons. The following table shows the wildcard characters you can use with the Like operator and the number of digits or strings they match.

Character(s) in pattern Matches in expression
? Any single character
* Zero or more characters
# Any single digit (09)
[charlist] Any single character in charlist
[!charlist] Any single character not in charlist

A group of one or more characters (charlist) enclosed in brackets ([ ]) can be used to match any single character in expression and can include almost any characters in the ANSI character set, including digits. In fact, the special characters opening bracket ([ ), question mark (?), number sign (#), and asterisk (*) can be used to match themselves directly only if enclosed in brackets. The closing bracket ( ]) can't be used within a group to match itself, but it can be used outside a group as an individual character.

In addition to a simple list of characters enclosed in brackets, charlist can specify a range of characters by using a hyphen (-) to separate the upper and lower bounds of the range. For example, using [A-Z] in pattern results in a match if the corresponding character position in expression contains any of the uppercase letters in the range A through Z. Multiple ranges can be included within the brackets without any delimiting. For example, [a-zA-Z0-9] matches any alphanumeric character.

Other important rules for pattern matching include the following:

An exclamation mark (!) at the beginning of charlist means that a match is made if any character except those in charlist are found in expression. When used outside brackets, the exclamation mark matches itself.

The hyphen (-) can be used either at the beginning (after an exclamation mark if one is used) or at the end of charlist to match itself. In any other location, the hyphen is used to identify a range of ANSI characters.

When a range of characters is specified, they must appear in ascending sort order (A-Z or 0-100). [A-Z] is a valid pattern, but [Z-A] isn't.

The character sequence [ ] is ignored; it's considered to be a zero-length string ("").

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Patrick MatthewsCommented:
Hi fnbgppl,

If you want to use full Regular Expressions, these UDF wrappers may come in handy:

http://vbaexpress.com/kb/getarticle.php?kb_id=841

Regards,

Patrick
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft Access

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.