Convert error

I am trying to convert a disk from FAT 32 to NTFS using the command line: convert disk: /fs:ntfs. Convert start ok, does a disk check reports that it is starting to convert. Then it reports:

"Error converting directory DIR_NAME.
The directory may be damaged or there may be insufficient disk space."

where DIR_NAME is the name of the direcotry ... several are listed.

This is running on a disk with plenty of space (120GB with 14 GB data).

This ocurrs both when running as system disk and as a data disk.

OS is XP home. Disk was cloned from original system disk as a backup.

jwmarkertAsked:
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KenneniahCommented:
Run a chkdsk /f  first and let it fix any errors. Then try converting again.
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jwmarkertAuthor Commented:
I did that already. It did not find anything. Thanks
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KenneniahCommented:
Sorry, forgot the r. Did you do chkdsk /f /r   ?
If there are bad sectors on the partition, convert will usually fail. In chkdsk, you need the /r to check for bad sectors.

If after running chkdsk /f /r it lists anything about ##KB in bad sectors, that would most likely be why.
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WelkinMazeCommented:
Hi there,

If you have the possibility to do it (have another disk for example) and this is not your system disk (for example if you use it just for data storage) I recommend that you copy all your data on other disk reformat the first one with NTFS and after that return the data back.
I always prefer to make such system operations having everything cleared before starting. This approach has saved me troubles for more than 10 years already and I've never had a serious issue with my computers - neither at home nor at the office.
Hope that helps...
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jwmarkertAuthor Commented:
Thanks for suggestions, but I am still having problems. I've run convert on 2 different installations of XP: one home and the other is professional ...  by moving the disk. Same results on both systems. Below are the command lines and results that I got by saving he screen output to a file and editing out the redundant messages.  

=============================
chkdsk
command line: chkdsk disk: /f  /r > chkdsk.log
    where "disk:" is the disk letter
=============================

The type of the file system is FAT32.
Volume ST 120 created 4/7/2006 6:58 PM
Volume Serial Number is 3F1D-13ED
Windows is verifying files and folders...
0 percent completed.                  
.
.
.
.
99 percent completed.....              
100 percent completed......            
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows is verifying free space...
0 percent completed.                  
5 percent completed..                
.
.
.
94 percent completed......            
99 percent completed.                  
100 percent completed..                
Free space verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
  117,189,600 KB total disk space.
      826,432 KB in 1,172 hidden files.
       81,984 KB in 2,550 folders.
   10,726,368 KB in 42,721 files.
  105,554,784 KB are available.

       32,768 bytes in each allocation unit.
    3,662,175 total allocation units on disk.
    3,298,587 allocation units available on disk.


===============================
convert
command line: convert disk: /fs:ntfs > convert.log
=================================

The type of the file system is FAT32.
Enter current volume label for drive E: st 120
Volume ST 120 created 4/7/2006 6:58 PM
Volume Serial Number is 3F1D-13ED
Windows is verifying files and folders...

100 percent completed..                
File and folder verification is complete.

Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
  117,189,600 KB total disk space.
      826,432 KB in 1,172 hidden files.
       81,984 KB in 2,550 folders.
   10,726,368 KB in 42,721 files.
  105,554,784 KB are available.

       32,768 bytes in each allocation unit.
    3,662,175 total allocation units on disk.
    3,298,587 allocation units available on disk.

Determining disk space required for file system conversion...
Total disk space:              117218227 KB
Free space on volume:          105554784 KB
Space required for conversion:   269617 KB
Converting file system
Error converting directory TEMP.
The directory may be damaged or there may be insufficient disk space.
Error converting directory LOCALS~1.
The directory may be damaged or there may be insufficient disk space.
Error converting directory ggarnold.
The directory may be damaged or there may be insufficient disk space.
Error converting directory DOCUME~1.
The directory may be damaged or there may be insufficient disk space.

The conversion failed.
E: was not converted to NTFS.


The disk is a system disk with XP Home installed. It is a clone created with Acronis to keep original safe until all problems are resolved.

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WelkinMazeCommented:
Did you try to rename one of these directories and look what happen ? Sometimes it works. Or to copy the directories on the same drive and delete the old ones. This also wotks sometimes.
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jwmarkertAuthor Commented:
WelkinMaze ... You may have hit on something. I tried to copy one of the directories to another directory. The system found a file that it cound not copy. I then searched for the file and found that the name contained illegal characters and it was created in the future. I found several more files with a similar file name. The only common thread was that the file name contained the characters "vk"
along with the presumably illegal characters represented by a box. I tried to delete the file and system reports:

"Cannot delete file: Cannot read from the source file or disk."

Is there a way to delete a file with illegal characters? Is there a utility that will read through an entire disk and identify unreadable files? Apparently chkdsk only looks at file system data.

Thanks to all who have contributed so far.
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jwmarkertAuthor Commented:
Another finding ...

If I look at the directory using dir/x, the 8 dot 3 file name seems to be blank or null. Still don't know how to delete these files.
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WelkinMazeCommented:
Sometimes it will work to rename the file and after that to delete it but I'm not sure it will work in this case.
Something else that I'm not sure will help is to try to install all possible windows encodings - like chinese and so on.
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jwmarkertAuthor Commented:
I tried that in the graphical interface and it reports:

"Cannot delet file: Cannot read from the source file or disk."

Then I went into the command window and did dir /x. The long file name had a couple of illegal characters in it; the 8.3 file was either blank, null or unprintable.

Does the FAT 32 file system use a file number by which one can delete the file?

Thanks again for your assistance.

Apparently this is a difficult question and I may have to split points. Therefore I'm increasing point value.
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WelkinMazeCommented:
In principal it is possible to use some low level manipulating program and to manipulate the FAT tables but this is something that's could be done only by person that is absolutely familiar with all low level manipulations so I do not recommend it.

Did you try the idea to install all possible windows characters encodings, I don't know if it will work but you can give it a try.
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jwmarkertAuthor Commented:
The source of this problem is directory corruption. It does not manifest itself when running chkdsk, however when one attempts to access the file by name, the problem appears. I used Gibin Soft's (http://www.gibinsoft.net/gipoutils/fileutil/) to read the disk and list problem files. Unfortunately I found no method to correct file problems.

I then genned up a new copy of XP and tried to copy the contents of the previous disk. I should have know better; copy crashed as soon as it hit one of the problem files.

I ultimately copied across good files. This was done, in part, by using "dir /b/s > file.bat" at the command line to generate a list of files with their path and using a macro editor to turn it into a series of copy commands.

Thanks to all who contributed. I am requesting that this question be closed.
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GranModCommented:
Closed, 500 points refunded.
GranMod
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Community Support Moderator of all Ages
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