Moving Win 2003 to RAID Controller

Hi All,
I have a server that has a 36 GB SCSI hard drive that that is running off of the onboard SCSI controller.  I have purchased 4 more 36 GB hard drive and a LSI Logic MegaRAID controller 320-1.  When I spoke with the LSI logic tech support, they told me that I could move my OS to RAID using the following Message


***Backed up the entire server***
1. Install the RAID Controller but leave the current hard drive on the Motherboard SCSI Controller
2. Boot Windows 2003 Server
3. Install the Hardware Drivers
4. Shutdown the System.
5. Move the Hard Drive onto the RAID Controller
6. Create a RAID-0 array with the single 36 GB hard drive
7. Boot the OS
8. Use their Power Manager software  program in Windows 2003 to configure the RAID 0 array to a RAID-5 array.

Everything was fine until step 7 when I tried to reboot to my OS with the new controller.  The Windows 2003 Server logo appears on the screen.  After the bar runs across about 6 times I receive a stop error say that Windows Shutdown to prevent damage.  Check for Viruses/ diskcheck....BLAH BLAH BLAH.

The Stop error is as follows:

Stop 0x0000007b, oxf78a2a94, 0xc00000034, 0x00000000, 0x0000000

I know that it can see the OS because the Windows 2003 screen comes up.  I have contacted LSI and they have no idea really how to resolve the problem.  They said that they really do not support moving the OS onto RAID, but they are willing to help me.  Many people succeed using this method.

Does anyone know what this stop error means?  Does Anyone know of a better way to move the OS.  I am thinking that if I create the RAID array and restore onto the RAID array that I will have the same problem.

Any Help would be greatly appreciated.  

Scott

smprossAsked:
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
7B - Inaccessible Boot Device typically means Windows doesn't have the driver for the controller setup OR the BOOT.INI file could be wrong.  If the driver was truly installed, I'd suggest trying to increment the value of the multi() or scsi() value - reference "The ARC (Advanced Risc Computing) Naming Convention" on this web page:
http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/multiboot/boot_ini.htm
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Hmm.  I must admit that I am scared of doing that as right now the system works when it is on the motherboard.  If I do that and it does not work, it may not work on either device.  Also, if it is an inaccessible boot device, why does Windows come up at all?


Thanks for the help.  Any more would be greatly appreciated.

Scott
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Suggestion - copy the boot.ini line - the boot.ini file is what provides the boot menu entries when the system starts.  


For example, if your file looks like this, just copy the line under [operating systems] and make a new one - like the example I'll post next.

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=OptIn
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional - Known Good" /fastdetect /NoExecute=OptIn
multi(1)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional - multi-1" /fastdetect /NoExecute=OptIn
multi(2)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional - multi-2" /fastdetect /NoExecute=OptIn

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TheCleanerCommented:
see...see....what did I say in your other question?  Sorry man, but I've seen too many strange things happen to trust the idea LSI originally had.

I still say go with my original idea from the other question, which is:

then you'll wipe out the current drive and create the Array using the Raid Array boot CD or bios utilities or whatever is used for that particular vendor.  Then you'll reboot, install the OS again, and restore from backup.

What backup software and methods did you use to backup the server?


Other than that...doing what leew is suggesting won't hurt you at this point, as you are basically going to either get it going or get to the point where you do the wipe/restore method.
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TheCleanerCommented:
Also, I know this is a lot of info, but this KB article may help:  http://support.microsoft.com/?id=822052

Are you certain that:

a)  the LSI card is supported in 2003 server?

b)  you have the correct/latest drivers for 2003 server? (these were the ones you installed in #3 above)

It sounds like it's very possible that the drivers you installed aren't compatible enough with 2003.  I would verify with LSI they are the right driver and version.  You SHOULD be able to swap back to the internal array controller and boot still, hopefully.  Then you can repeat step #3 with the right drivers if they are different.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
leew and Cleaner,
First off, thanks for the help!  Cleaner, I spent several hours on the phone with LSI.  I am sure that I have the correct drivers installed and that they support Windows 2003.  I reaaaallly don't want to reinstall the OS as this is a domain controller. I am able to switch back to the original SCSI controller and everything works fine.  I have been going back and forth for several hours now.  I am not in any deep trouble (Yet) and I would like to stay that way.  My backup software is Veritas.  I have several good backup and all of our data is backed up using the Live Vault online service.
(I may be crazy to try something like this but I am not crazy enough to do it without knowing that I have several good backups!)

leew,
Can you describe further what will happen my modifying the Boot.ini file in this manner.  When I switch back to the motherboard SCSI device, will I still be able to boot the OS?

Any third party software that might be able to help?

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
what model is the scsi controller?  Full model # please.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I can't say much more than I already have.  During the NT boot process, this file is read and is used to determine where windows is - on what controller, what physical disk, and what partition.  The modifications I suggest are text changes to a text file so it's easy to undo them.  

If you're THAT worried, you can build yourself an NT boot disk - this is not a SETUP boot disk or a DOS boot disk - basically, such a disk uses 3-5 files on any old floppy that has been formatted under Windows 2000/2003/NT/XP.  It then reads the boot.ini file and starts windows from the location specified.

Read over:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=305595 (It's pretty much the same for Windows 2003 server).
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Just remember - use the EDITED boot.ini files, not your original.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Cleaner,
Here is the model:
MegaRAID SCSI 320-1 and the link to check it out:
http://www.lsilogic.com/products/megaraid/scsi_320_1.html

leew,
I will give this a try tomorrow.  Do I put all of the three lines in the same boot.ini or do I try them one at a time?

SCott

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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You can put all three in - it will just create a menu.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
leew,
Would this mean that I would boot off of the first option when the drive is attached to the Motherboard SCSI (the current configuration) and then try the other two options with the RAID controller?

Sorry for all the questions, but this is getting outside of my area of knowledge.

Scott
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smprossAuthor Commented:
One other question...
Is there a RAID controller (Such as adaptec that can perform this type of operation).  I am not against switching to another brand if they can do this without needing to reinstall.


Scott
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
yes, when the drive is attached to motherboard SCSI, you boot off the first option, when attached to RAID, TRY booting off the other two.  I can't PROMISE it will work, but it shouldn't hurt.  

Older RAID controllers will have the drivers built in to Windows.  There is likely nothing wrong with the RAID controller, but you need the drivers.  Most older RAID controllers probably won't run as fast.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Hi Cleaner,
That is the driver that I am using.  Tech support said that this is the latest driver

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
Well, as long as the BIOS recognizes the SCSI controller, and shows it to be configured with an array and a logical drive, and you do like leew says with the boot.ini, then it should work to boot
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smprossAuthor Commented:
That is what I am hoping for... I probably won't have a chance to look at it until next week.

Scott
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Hey Guys,
Here is an update... I tried changing the Boot.ini as you instructed and it did not work.  In fact I never got the Windows 2003 Server screen that I at least got with the original settings.

So here are my questions now?

First, any other suggestions to try before I change my strategy?

Second would a different RAID card such as an Adaptec handle this better?

What other options do I have besides performing a reinstall of the operating system?

Thanks again for all you help.

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
Scott,

While I understand what you are attempting to accomplish (not having to restore), I've just never done it that way.  Not saying it cannot be done, nor that Adaptec or others may be able to do it.  But in my experience, when I've replaced an internal RAID card with a PCI-X or similar card for hosting the arrays, I've always rebuilt the server and restored from backup.

Now granted, I don't do this often, as I tend to buy the biggest/best array controller I can get for the server, based on what I think it will be doing for the next 3-5 years.


That said,

Depending on what you are trying to get to as far as disk space, you "could" possibly do something like this:

*If the onboard controller supports RAID1"
1.  add a 2nd drive to the existing array and mirror it
2.  Add the 3rd and 4th drive to the new controller and mirror them

That would still give you 72GB of usable space, same as if you did a RAID1 across all 4 drives.

I know you said RAID5 though, so at that I'm back to a rebuild/restore.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Cleaner,
As you have probably seen, I have started another thread asking followup questions:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/Windows_Server_2003/Q_21809548.html

What do you think about the possibility of being able to reinstalled Windows 2003 on top on the current installation.  During the beginning of the reinstallation when the Windows 2003 setup program prompts me for the RAID controller, I can hit F6 and install the LSILogic Driver.  Is that as good as doing a reinstall?  Or would the complete reinstall accomplish something different?

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
Scott,

I would say that if you get to the point where it's either that or a complete reinstall and restore, since you already have backups, it's only going to cost some time to try that theory.

You won't be able to actually "reinstall" on top of the existing one, it will either require you to install it in something like c:\windows2 or it will "repair" it.  Unless I'm confused myself now...which could be...
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Really?
Although I have not done this with Windows 2003, I recall going through the setup process with 2000 and XP and having it ask if I want to reinstall the operating system.  Maybe that is the same as the "repair" it feature.  I think that before I do this, I am going to demote the server to a member server and only have one Domain controller on the network.  After demoting the server, I will back it up a second time.  I know that it is much easier to restore a member server than a domain controller.

Any thoughts?

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
I would concur with demoting it first...that's a good idea.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Great.  Thanks again for your help.  I am going to keep this thread open until I have completed... But the points are yours of course!

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
Don't forget my man leew... :)
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smprossAuthor Commented:
LOL,
I won't... He has been helpful as well. But you have really kept it going!  Last night I demoted the server to a member server.  This makes me feel much better.  Now the only two parts that I have to be concerned about are the OS and MS Exchange.

Scott
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Cleaner,

Just an update... I need to push back the reinstallation.  My tape drive failed last night  and I am not  going to try this without a good onsite backup.  I am crazy... not stupid.

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
LOL, yeah...I wouldn't either.

Personally, I would back it up to tape, and even then, I would probably back up if possible using NTbackup or even Veritas to a file as well.  Can't be too cautious with Exchange in the mix.  Tape backups sometimes like to get "corrupt" at the worst time.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Actually, I also have online backup to LiveVault.  Each night the server also gets backed up online.  So I do have redundant backup.  But I do know what you mean!


Scott
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Cleaner,
Well, The reinstall did not work.  Windows 2003 would not let me do a reinstall on that partition.  I have a feeling that it may be due to the fact that it was a dynamic disk.  Thanks for all the help anyway.  There is some really good info in this thread that may help others so you guys deserve some points!



BTW, thanks Leew also!

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
Thanks...be sure and post whatever finally works out for you...it will be helpful to others in the same situation.
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smprossAuthor Commented:
Cleaner...
All that worked was completely reinstalling the Operating system and then reloading the data from backup.  It was a complete pain, but it did resolve the problem.  I think that when you move to a RAID configuration from a non RAID configuration in a server that is up and running, this is the only sure fire way to do it.

Scott
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TheCleanerCommented:
good deal...that's the way I've always done it myself too...maybe there are other ways, but I'm used to the slow and steady...
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