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Multiple VPN tunnels over a single broadband connection

I have a cable broadband connection through my local ISP.  It works fine.  I can also connect to my corporate vpn via this broadband connection with no problem.  I would just like to know is there any way to establish multiple vpn tunnels over this same broadband circuit.  I can establish a vpn tunnel but when another pc on the same network establishes a tunnel it immediately terminates the vpn tunnel of the first pc.  Is there a hardware device or software out there that allows me to do this?  Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Mac
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Rodlab
Asked:
Rodlab
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1 Solution
 
mattacukCommented:
What device are you currently useing to terminate the VPN? different makes and models have limations on how man tunnels can be made.
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
As suggested by mattacuk, this is not usually a limitation of the ISP but rather your local router. If you are connecting, as it sounds, by means of a VPN client, many routers will only allow a single outgoing VPN connection. If the other PC is trying to connect to the same VPN server/company you will not likely be able to do this as there are routing issues. To accomplish multiple users to the same site you will probably have to add a VPN router at the second site to create a branch-to-branch VPN tunnel.
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mattacukCommented:
Agreed, there are 2 main types of VPN -

>Remote access VPN (using client software on your pc) using either PPTP, L2TP over IPSEC (typically Microsoft), or IPSEC (Cisco for exmaple) - this is terminated by a gateway device (typically a Server for Microsoft, or VPN Router,PIX firewall or VPN concentrator with Cisco),

or

Lan to Lan (Router to Router) IPSEC VPN's using ESP and or AH. In this scenario you will have  2 peer devices that keep a permanent "tunnel" between your networks. Any data sent with the address of the remote network in the  packets header is encapsulated and encrypted by your local router and sent over the public internet, the receiving peer router will then de-encrypt this data and send it onto its destination.

Depending on your requirements you can choose the best one  for you. From what you have said it sounds to me like you want various people to be able to remote when needed,  in which case a remote access option might be the most suitable. For  this as mentioned, you can choose  from various products depending on your needs. If you require  only a small amount of users to gain access you could choose a low end router such as a cisco 800 series (up to 5 remote access  VPN's). Or if your requirements are more dense, a higher end router such as an 1800 series.  Having said that, you will need a certain level of Cisco expertise to set this up! So something like the VPN 3000 concentrator series might be more suitable;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/vpndevc/ps2284/index.html

Microsoft Server comes with Routing and Remote access services. This is also very easy to set up, and might be just what you need. I read far too many Cisco books these days anyway!!

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jeff_trentCommented:
I ran into this issue at home while using a Linksys WRT54G wireless router on my cable internet connection.  There is no workaround for the Linksys that I'm aware of, but most larger firewall/router devices support multiple VPN tunnels.  Check out the Linksys RV042 for example.  I'm sure there are plenty of others...
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jeff_trentCommented:
Any luck or any further findings?
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RodlabAuthor Commented:
I had a spare PIX 515e so I just used it as my firewall and it allows hundreds of vpn tunnels.  So I am good to go!

Mac
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jeff_trentCommented:
>>  There is no workaround for the Linksys that I'm aware of, but most larger firewall/router devices support multiple VPN tunnels.

You're welcome   ;)

BTW:  Who has spare Cisco PIX firewalls just "lying around"???  
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RodlabAuthor Commented:
This connection is for the company I work for and we use PIX firewalls on all of our remote sites (around 50 or so) for vpn connectivity.  So, we had a spare one here at the home office just in case one broke down.  Oh, and a belated thank you Jeff!

Mac
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jeff_trentCommented:
Glad it was a relatively easy fix.  It's always nice to be able to use top notch gear like the PIX 515E.  Now just be sure to order another spare, so you don't get caught with your pants down if one of the others fails.
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