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Vertical "son of Suckerfish" navigation - positioning question

I'm using a son of suckerfish menu  - http://www.htmldog.com/articles/suckerfish/dropdowns/ .  The one problem that I'm having with the menus is that if the vertical navigation gets too close to the viewable bottom of the page, the subnavigations continue off the bottom of the viewable page without having a good way to be able to get to it.  Ideally, in this situation, it would be great if the subnavigational menu would be bottom justified, instead of top justified with the primary menu item, like:

menu item
menu item
menu item    | submenu item
menu item    | submenu item
menu item---| submenu item
----------------------------------------< bottom of viewable page

instead of like:

menu item
menu item
menu item    
menu item    
menu item---| submenu item
----------------------------------------< bottom of viewable page
                   | submenu item
                   | submenu item

Any easy solutions to this problem?
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periwinkle
Asked:
periwinkle
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3 Solutions
 
elwahaCommented:
I had a similar problem on my page.  What i've done at the bottom is place a spacer image that is tall enough to allow for the dropdown nav.

<img src="../../img/spacer.gif" height="200px">
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periwinkleAuthor Commented:
I think I understand what you are saying - you've added space so that all menu items can be viewed even if your page isn't very deep -- do I understand?

However, this is a little bit different - I'm trying to deal with a scrolling page.  I have a page which is more than one screen-ful deep.  My problem isn't that the physical page cuts off the subnavigation items, but that the subnavigation items are partly beyond the scroll.  The ideal solution would be for the menu in this case to be bottom justified instead of top justified.
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elwahaCommented:
You understand what I've done.  Thanks for the clarification on what your looking for..  
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periwinkleAuthor Commented:
Anyone else?

Or, alternatively, is it possible to overcome the fact that you can't use the mouse wheel in netscape to scroll through the page?
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GrandSchtroumpfCommented:
These types of menu have lots of accessibility problems.  Make sure you provide an alternate navigation (simple links at the bottom of the page for instance).   The major accessibility problem is for people who don't use a mouse.  Also, i find those submenus very hard to use.  There are some javascript menus that use some kind of delay before closing the branches, that's a little better IMHO (even if i don't like javascript widgets in general).  Some of those javascript menus also place the sub-menus in accessible area of the screen.
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periwinkleAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your comments.  We have actually done some work so that the main categories are clickable, and lead to a static list of subcategories, as well as having static links on the site as well - I think we're well covered for the accessibility issues at this point.  We're just trying to make the menus work a little better than they probably can :)

The one problem I have with javascript menus (and I know a couple of pretty good scripts) is that they end up getting to be very 'heavy' in size fairly quickly.  As we are already producing a database-driven web site, we're hoping to have light-weight menus.
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GrandSchtroumpfCommented:
> We have actually done some work so that the main categories are clickable, and lead to a static list of subcategories, as well as having static links on the site as well
Excellent !!!  I'm glad you take accessibility issues seriously.
I want to make it clear that I don't want to encourage you to use a javascript menu.  Actually I encourage people simply not to use any kind of popup menu.  This way you can be sure you won't have any problems.
Theoretically, it should be possible to program a non-obstrusive javascript pop-up menu that transforms your suckerfish structure (nested lists) into whatever you want.  If you place that script in an external file, the file will need to be downloaded only once.  So, that should not degrade your site performance.

> We're just trying to make the menus work a little better than they probably can :)
That seems right... initially, the suckerfish was a demonstration of some tricks that could be acheived using the ":hover" pseudo-class.  But CSS is mean to style your pages, not to create dynamic effects... it has its limitations.
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periwinkleAuthor Commented:
Believe me, I do understand... it wouldn't be my first choice to use these menus - but I'm not the site owner :)  
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periwinkleAuthor Commented:
Thanks all - I'm sorry to have left this one standing!  When the client realized that they could use the scrollbar on their mouse, and that only about 0.5% of their users were using Netscape, they calmed down and decided to use as is.

We also added a way for them to go to a full index of the items, too.
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