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Need to know if this is a reasonable amount of protection

Posted on 2006-04-13
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Last Modified: 2013-12-04
My 11 loves to game online, but is clueless about clicking on popups, if he thinks they look real.  As a result, we recently had to reformat (was easier to reformat than to continue trying to debug it).

Immediately after reboot, I installed adaware, Ewido, and free-av.  I also put in Kerio and Peer Guardian.  Is this a reasonable amount of protection for him, or is there anything else I need to add?

Thanks!
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Question by:indymom810
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by:Dmitri Farafontov
ID: 16451219
You can try AdMuncher, a small proxy. Which will allow filtering not only pop-ups and but the applications such as MSN Messenger and ICQ, from banners. It also has a configurable filter list. I would recommend Kaspersky Internet Security as an Antivirus Solution. This way he wont even see the banners anymore =)
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16451339
Hi indymom810,

ms defender is fairly useful as well despite being resource heavy, zone alarm as a firewall actually protects quite well

just another couple of option, above had it wrappped up anyway

Cheers!
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16451371
Don't give the kid admin rights.  Make him a limited user.
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Rant32 earned 2000 total points
ID: 16452709
There's enough nasty stuff out there that will install without Admin privileges.

My best solution is to disable downloading Signed & Unsigned Active X controls (that's what's causing the popups and software installed through internet explorer).
Log on with the restricted user account.
IE > Tools > Internet options > Security > Internet zone > Custom > Download signed + unsigned active x controls --> Disable them both

Only disable DOWNLOADING them, you still need to be able to RUN controls. But then it will only run the controls installed by the Administrator.

If you need to install stuff (like WindowsUpdate controls, new version of shockwave/flash etc) switch to another user account with Admin privileges. Protects like a charm and you don't need any antispyware/defender/adaware stuff that's just as bad as the malware itself and doesn't work anyway.
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Author Comment

by:indymom810
ID: 16452976
Do you know if any of these will interfere with gaming, or what are the best ones to use when gaming?  He likes to play City of Heroes and City of Villains, as well as occasionally Disney Toontown, and I want to make sure that he can still access the programs he wants without totally bombing them.

Thanks so much for your help.
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16453013
most should be fine, your not blocking anything except installation etc
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by:Dave_Hunt
ID: 16453471
All great solutions, but my favorite is to use a disk imaging solution.  I have a Ghost image of each of the kids computers burned to DVD.  Whenever the machines start acting up, I pop in the DVD, reboot and voila! a clean computer with only 5 minutes of work.  

My kids aren't old enough to have any data on the machines, but they can mess them up...

Sure it takes a bit of preperation to build the image and every few months I have to patch the machine and rebuild the image, but i do save time in the long run.

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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16453497
Also, a solution that not many people know about and utilise

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/sharedaccess/default.mspx

this allows a lot more control on your part
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by:Rant32
ID: 16455489
Imaging is nice for 'disaster recovery' purposes, but even a Windows installation that appears to be static needs to be updated, programs get installed, user settings get changed... I very much prefer to keep a system running instead of recovering it every 2 months. I have a Windows XP installation running for over 3 years now, and never needs to be recovered because I don't allow any unexpected crap to run on it.

No admin priviliges, virusscanner, disable ActiveX download. Then image if you want, but I don't think you'll ever need it unless something goes wrong with the hard drive.

Thanks for the link JayJay, I'll look into that.
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Expert Comment

by:mrenos
ID: 16457191
Try installing mozilla firefox and remove the internet explorer from his area ( start menu, desktop etc ). Also leew's : " Don't give the kid admin rights.  Make him a limited user." is an excelent compination among with the software protection that you installed.

Hope this helps.
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Author Comment

by:indymom810
ID: 16458811
May I ask, what difference will not making him an admin make?  It's been a while since I have looked at what admin vs non-admin is -- does it mean that he can't download anything at all?  Sorry for the dumb question, I just can't remember.
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Author Comment

by:indymom810
ID: 16458813
Oh, BTW, he didn't have IE on his area when it crashed, he only had Mozilla.
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16458939
basically means he cant install appz, he can still download and carry out basic tasks but he is restricted
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by:Rant32
ID: 16459654
Thanks for the points!

A more comprehensive overview, for those interested, on the principles of Least Privileges is here:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/maintain/luawinxp.mspx

The most obvious difference between Administrator and Users are Full Control permissions on the Program Files and Windows folders (vs Read-only) and Full Control on the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE hive of the registry where system-wide settings and software is stored.

Other differences are:
• Install, start, and stop services and device drivers.
• Create, modify, and delete registry settings.
• Install, run, and uninstall programs.
• Replace operating system files.
• Terminate processes.
• Control firewall settings.
• Manage event log entries.
• Install Microsoft ActiveX® controls.
• Access the SAM.

as well as all kinds of obscure user rights assignments you don't need to bother with. You don't want your 11yo to do that, ey? ;-)

Cheers!
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