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VPN - Configuration/Setup for SBS 2003

I am in the process of setting up a SBS 2003.  I have a single gigbit NIC on the server.  I will not be using the SBS firewall features.  I am using a third party hardware solution for the firewall.

In order for me to use the vpn features of SBS do I need 2 nic cards on the server?
What ports need to be open?
If I do need to use 2 nics I assume 1 nic can be dedicated to do the vpn & incoming & outgoing e-mail services out to the internet.

I assume the second nic can be used to provide the connectivity internally for Outlook, DNS, AD, etc?

Please advise on any articles or suggestions as I beging to configure this.

Thanks

Alex
0
alexsolares
Asked:
alexsolares
1 Solution
 
Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Hi alexsolares,

A single NIC configuration will work just fine for SBS's native VPN.  It uses port 1723, but you don't need to do a thing with that if your hardware firewall (assuming it's a router) is UPnP compliant.  If it isn't, you'll have to manually point port 1723 to your SBS.

All of the configuration for providing connectivity should be done by using the Configure Email and Internet Connection Wizard (CEICW) and the Remote Access Wizard.  Both of these are found in Server Management Console > Internet and Email.

Please see http://sbsurl.com/ceicw and http://sbsurl.com/msicw for references on how to use the CEICW

http://sbsurl.com/raw will provide you the how-to for the remote access wizard.

I should point out that these two wizards are items #2 and #3 of the To-Do list which is part of SBS's installation procedure.  If you have not completed the entire To-Do list, your server is not completely installed.  Any of the items on this list can also be rerun to modify your server's configuration.


A bit of clarification on your suppositions:
>>>If I do need to use 2 nics I assume 1 nic can be dedicated to do the vpn & incoming & outgoing e-mail services out to the internet.
>>>I assume the second nic can be used to provide the connectivity internally for Outlook, DNS, AD, etc?

Essentially, yes, this is what occurs.  You would then put a SWITCH on the INTERNAL side to connect your workstations.  An overview of this configuration is here:  http://sbsurl.com/twonics

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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