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Which DVD Disc's do I need

I have a Dual Layer Pioneer DVD writer but am a little confused with which disc's to purchase to optimise this.

I have seen single layer discs which are clearly self explanatory but then there are other discs which do not specify a layer but have 4.7 GB/Go and a chart on the back listing the different video modes Fine, SP, LP etc. Does this mean that they are Dual Layer?
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Marina2006
Asked:
Marina2006
5 Solutions
 
CallandorCommented:
No, you want discs that have a ~9GB capacity - they will cost more than single layer discs.  The chart was just for information as to how much video you can fit on the disc using different video resolutions.
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maduropaCommented:
In addition to what Callandor said,

Dual Layer discs will be marked as such, and have a ditto price-tag,
Here they costs up to three four times as much as single-layer.
So single-layer are usually more cost-effective.
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CallandorCommented:
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x86fixCommented:
I think these previous answers are good assuming you have a need to use dual layer DVD's.

If by optimizing you mean optimizing value, it is a bit subjective.  My idea of value is slightly different.

You can burn dual layer or single layer DVD's.  It does not make any sense to buy and burn dual layer disks just because you have a dual layer CAPABLE burner.  If you are burning less than 4.7Gb, it is a complete waste to use the dual layer DVD since everything would fit on the cheaper, simpler, single layer DVD.  

The advatage of the dual layer is it lets you put almost 2 DVD layers on the same DVD nearly doubling capacity.  It is much more complicated since it has 2 layers instead of one that it uses to read and write data too.  

Perhaps the most common use of dual layer DVD's is for more than 4.7 GB of data but less than 8.5 GB.  You could use 2 single layer DVD's or just 1 dual layer.  The advantage is you have everything on 1 dvd- so for something like a standard length movie, that uses a 8.5 GB DVD,  there is no need to swap DVD's half way through.  Many people to want to have that same capacity at home- to burn an entire movie to their own DVD.

I find that the cost of DUAL layer disks makes it impractical for me since I don't burn feature movies.  I rarely feel the need to have 8.5 GB on a single DVD, and 2 single layer DVD's are generally much less expensive.  I can just as easily keep 2 DVD's together as a set if I have that much data.  That is what I consider optimzing even though my DVD drive is dual layer and I could burn a single dual layer DVD instead.

The actual numbers depend on where you buy nad how many ata time, but the cost per GB is 5-10times higher on dual layer DVD's.

You do want to get DVD's that are at least as fast as your burner.  Slower ones will work but generally burn at the listed rate or can be more prone to errors.  It is not wise to pay a premium for DVD's that are rated for a higher spped than what your burn is capable of.  

The -R +R is a difference in standards.  I have found that some players will play one standard and not the other.  My experience has been that most computer DVD players play either.  For instance The +R plays in  my DVD player in the car but not the -R.  
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Marina2006Author Commented:
Thank you this has been very informative would you mind expanding on the different video resolutions.

Does this mean that I could get as much as 240 minutes on a DVD if I use a low enough resolution when burning?Could I for example get the contents of a Dual Layer disc onto a single layer disc if I used a low enough resolution?
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maduropaCommented:
Yes,
With a DVD-shrinking tool you can compress the MPEG-stream so a larger movie will fit on a smaller DVD.

When used with a DVD-recorder for TV-signals, you usually get 2 hours with standard-quality on one (standard) DVD, 4 Hours with Long Play , and for Fine Mode I take a guess, one hour ?

When a Dual Layer disk is filled with 4 hours of movie-play (SP) , you can compress it back to LP and fit it on a single-layer disc.
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