ASR , F6 , F2 sequence doe's not work!

Hi,

I used the backup program to make the ASR tapes and floppy.

Now in order to test the restore process I booted the IBM server from the Windows installation CD which did not regognise the RAID-5 disk array.
I extracted the drivers from the IBM server CD to a floppy diskette then rebooted the server from the Windows CD-ROM.When prompted I pressed the F6 key to install the driver for the RAID controller and then the setup program was able to recognise and see the HDD.

Now how can I go back to the ASR option "F2" since this is what I wanted to do in the first place!!!

Please explain

Thanks
raedaljarrahAsked:
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KromptonCommented:
When you created the ASR backup did you let it create the floppy? What files are on the disk?

Krompton
KromptonCommented:
DUH, my bad. Guess I should pay a bit more attention to what I read. Sorry about that.

The windows installation CD you used, was it a system recovery disk or stright Windows Server install disk. Does the install continue or halt? If it continues it probably has an unattended.txt or winnt.sif file and it will default to that. Make a bootable copy of the disk but leave out the unattended.txt or winnt.sif file because after loading RAID drivers the install should continue and let you select F2.

Hope this helps.
Krompton
raedaljarrahAuthor Commented:
Hi,

Here is my problem once again:

The built-it backup utility successfully created the backup tape and the associated floppy diskette
RAID system files were successfully created from an IBM server CD and put on a separate floppy
The original Windows 2003 server CD was used to boot up the server
During the boot process , I presses F6 to install the RAID drivers
The Windows setup program was then able to recognise the HDD
I was then presented with a setup message to proceed with Windows installation
It seems that the original F2 option is gone!!!

Any idea how can I get the F2 option back after I am done with the F6 option

Regards
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raedaljarrahAuthor Commented:
Hi,

Here is my problem:

The built-it backup utility successfully created the backup tape and the associated floppy diskette "ASR mode"
SCSI tape & HDD system files were successfully created from an IBM server CD and put on separate floppy diskettes
The original Windows 2003 server CD was used to boot up the server
During the boot process , I pressed F6 to install the SCSI drivers for both the tape drive and the HDD
I was then presented with a setup message to proceed with Windows installation in ASR mode

The setup program then starts the Windows backup program in restore mode and is asking to insert the tape media which is there in the drive , it keeps on asking to insert the media over and over.It seems that the setup program did not recognise the tape drive and that it cannot read from it!

Any ideas please?

Regards
KromptonCommented:
After hitting F6, to install the raid, did you install the driver for the tape drive at the same time?
Check the files on the ARS floppy. There should be 2-4 files for the RAID drivers. Probably an inf, sys or cat files depending on the model/manfacturer. You will probably have to manually find & add at least the sys and inf file for the tape drive to the floppy. When you add the raid follow the same procedure and add the tape drivers. Setup should then be able to access the tape.

Good luck,
Krompton
raedaljarrahAuthor Commented:
Its said that ASR can be run in two modes:

The first one uses the backup everything option , does this mean that it will back up all drives (C: , D: , etc)?

If yes then why should we bother creating the classical full backup media any way?

Just wanted to know the difference

Thanks
KromptonCommented:
ASR is supposed to be able to back up all drives. That’s nice in principle and although I have not encountered a problem myself a number of folks have reported that ASR sometimes won't restore anything except the OS partition, basically letting you boot but not restoring any data partitions/drives. Depending on what that data is that could be a bad time.
raedaljarrahAuthor Commented:
Given a server with three logical drives:

C: - Contains only the OS

D: - Contains only program files , they are installed on D: but have registry values on C:

E: - Contains only data files

Now , ASR can only be used to backup/restore the C: drive.
During the restore process , will it preserve the original partition table?
It will format only the C: drive
It will not format D: & E:

Is that true?

Thanks
KromptonCommented:
Assuming you told it to back up everything;

It WILL format all partitions and...
It SHOULD restore data for C, D and E. I have done this two or three time in the past with no trouble. However, some people have reported that ASR only restored the data on C and that they had to restore the other partitions from a standard backup.

I opted for relying more on a standard backup. I just felt more comfortable with it.

To each his own I suppose.

Krompton

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