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Upgrade from RHEL4 to RHEL 4.2

I have a system which was installed with the RHEL4 base release.  I would like to upgrade it to RHEL 4.2, but I can't seem to figure out the syntax of 'up2date --upgrade-to-release'  I have tried using the 4.2 channel, but I must have it wrong.  I would rather use up2date, but can yum do this task easier?  Is this the way I should be upgrading?

Also, since yum seems to be the standard in Fedora, will yum be the preferred way to update a RHEL system in future releases?  Thanks.
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barthalamu
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barthalamu
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m1tk4Commented:
You don't need --upgrade-to-release, just a regular up2date -u will do.

--upgrade-to-release was needed back in RedHat 7-9 days when you switched from 7 to 8 and so on, it was also used to switch from Fedora Core 1 to 2 to 3.

After up2date you can check

rpm -q redhat-release

and it should show "redhat-release-4ES-3", since it's really 4.3 that's the latest.

Yes, you should stick to up2date because it's the only way to get updates from RHN. If you are getting the updates from someplace else you can use yum but it doesn't give you anything up2date doesn't provide, and you can set up up2date to connect to yum repos as well.

No, as far as I know there are no plans to switch from up2date to yum in RHEL, because up2date also implements server profile activation with RHN - something that is uniquely RedHat's and is not implemented in yum (which is used by many other distributions as well).
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barthalamuAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your help.  Unfortunately I don't want to go right to RHEL 4.3 yet due to applications that have not been tested on this release yet that are tested on RHEL 4.2.  Is there a way to just upgrade to 4.2?  Thanks.
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m1tk4Commented:
Yes, you can download the ISO images for a specific release from RHN - once logged in go to "channels", "download ISO images of channel content" and so on.

You'll need to stop rhnsd service though and stop using up2date if you don't want to upgrade to 4.3. Note that kernel is not upgraded by default, so if you are dependent on a specific kernel version and nothing else, using up2date from 4.0 is safe - you can do an up2date and then install the specific kernel version from 4.2 release.
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barthalamuAuthor Commented:
m1tk4:

I guess that it is not really possible to do what I wanted.  Thanks for the info though.
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m1tk4Commented:
well, what you can do is try to find out what is it really that requires specifically 4.2 - i.e. list of RPMs that have to stay at 4.2 release numbers. You can then add these RPMs to ignore list along with the kernel, update manually to the versions you need to freeze them at and then just let everything else update the regular way.

Unless your application relies on a very specific version of kernel, I would say there are VERY good chances that it will work just fine in 4.3
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barthalamuAuthor Commented:
Yea, that is probably the best option I've got.  Thanks a lot.
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