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Moved server, changed IP, need old IP static route to new IP

Hello, I have a problem!  I just moved a production server from my 192.168.10.x network to another location, on a 192.168.3.x network.  I've changed the IP of the server just fine and can ping it.  My problem is I have a very very old application that has the old server IP coded in and won't be changable for some time.  What I need to do is have my routers know that any traffic headed for 192.168.10.5 should be sent to 192.168.3.5.  

Can anyone help me with this?

Thanks!
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alanteigne
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alanteigne
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1 Solution
 
nprignanoCommented:
what brand and model of router(s) do you have?  if you want help configuring the router, we'll have o know which kins it is first.
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alanteigneAuthor Commented:
Ah!  Sorry... long day.  I have a Cisco 3725 and Cisco 2621.

Alan
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
So you want requests sent to 192.168.10.5 to be sent to 192.168.3.5?

The only way I can think of is to use NAT. But this is going to create a problem if you still have a 192.168.10.0 network anywhere.

-Don
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noctotCommented:
  You can't really use NAT for this as NAT translates the source IP and port but not the destination IP and port. What you want is a proxy server. Have all users use the proxy as their gateway and program the proxy to redirect traffic bound for the old IP to the new.
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
>  You can't really use NAT for this as NAT translates the source IP and port but not the destination IP and port.

Not if you do port forwarding.

-Don
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noctotCommented:
Don,
   That's true but that destination translation would be on the destination router. To redirect traffic to the new subnet he would need to change the destination IP on the source router. That's not covered by PAT.
   This exact same issue just came up today where I work and one of the Cisco security guys suggested running NAT inside-out. He said that would probably work fine for reaching the one, translated destination but it would hose all other traffic. Maybe it's possible if you don't need NAT for any other application in the network, i.e. there is no Internet access.
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alanteigneAuthor Commented:
Man, I'm beginning to think there is no way to do it.  Whatever solution I implement must not interfere with any other traffic, and the 192.168.10.x network still must be reachable as if nothing changed.  I guess I'm going to have to look into modifying the ancient app that is causing the trouble.  That won't be any fun, but you've gotta do what you've gotta do!
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
Yes. The biggest hurdle with this is trying to retain the 192.168.10.0 network.

-Don
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alanteigneAuthor Commented:
Yup, and since that's the Corp HQ, I'm sure not going to risk bringing it down!
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noctotCommented:
My only other suggestion would be to install a second NIC in the server and assign it the 192.168.10.5 address. If you have switches that are advanced enough you can create a VLAN that will support the 192.168.10.x network in the new location.
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