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Windows XP Home Edition

I recently purchased a new server with Windows 2003 and I want to know if the my workstations can connect to it while running Windows XP Home Edition? My new software company told me my workstations were fine so I was wondering if he planned on running the system using a workgroup instead of a domain.
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marquisrh
Asked:
marquisrh
1 Solution
 
Cherukuri30Service EngineerCommented:
It does not matter whether it is domain or workgroup, you still can access shared resource from the server through windows XP home edition.

But you definitely cannot join windows XP home edition to the domain. Your windows XP should run under workgroup mode and needs to be in the same network to access the shared resources from server.
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CarlWarnerCommented:
Windows XP Home cannot join a domain, or can it?
http://vowe.net/archives/001639.html
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isd503Commented:
Windows XP Home Edition cannot join a domain.  However, a machine in a workgroup will be able to attach to domain resources as long as you can authenticate.
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marquisrhAuthor Commented:
I guess I will be running the server in a workgroup mode for awhile as I already spent alot on the new software and server. I will purchase XP Pro for all my computers and will then setup a domain. I need some help setting up this server as a workgroup without a domain. I can see my server in my workgroup but I can't access it. I setup a shared test folder on the server so I could make sure it was accessible through my network. I also setup the permissions with my computer name of the computer that I want to access the server from. Do you have a procedure to setup shared resources on my server using the server without a domain.  Thanks for all the help
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isd503Commented:
First, you need to make sure both machines are on the same subnet.  If one is using a 192.168.0.x IP address and the other is using 10.232.4.x for example, change it so both machines are on the same subnet, using the same subnet mask.  Example:

Server:
192.168.0.2 - IP
255.255.255.0 - SNM

Workstation:
192.168.0.3
255.255.255.0 - SNM

Add a defaut gateway if you need them to access the Internet, or a routed network.

Then you need to disabled Simple File Sharing in XP; Start | Run | explorer | OK | Tools | Folder Options | View, uncheck Use simple file sharing (Recommended).

Then make sure File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks is checked in the properties of your NIC.  Go to Network Properties to access the Properties.

Then make sure you are using pass through authentication; create a local account on each machine using the same username and password.  When you try to access resources on a different machine, you won't have to use a different userid and password each time.

You should be able to experiment with share and NTFS permissions to get what you need.  I prefer to control access only through NTFS permissions and assign Everyone/Full Control to every share permission.  if you do not do this, the operating system will compare the NTFS and share permissions you have assigned and give you the most restrictive permissions.  If you have NTFS/Read Only and share/Full Control, you get Read Only, etc.
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