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Files are Read Only after System Crash and Recovery

Posted on 2006-04-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
I have a Windows 2000 Server that was running software mirroring (RAID1). One of the 40GB disks failed. I rebuilt the server using hardware RAID 1 (Adaptec 1200A) and used two different drives (120GB each) for mirroring. Once the server was rebuilt, I attached the 40GB drive, used Windows Disk Management to copy the data from it to one of the new mirrored drives (120GB).

Now that the data is recovered, I can't read it because the files are all read only. However, if you RIGHT CLICK a file, and look at the READ ONLY checkbox, it's unchecked. I've tried changing the files to READ ONLY, and then changing them back, and that doesn't seem to work.

For Word and Excel files, it allows me to open them as READ ONLY. For PDF files, I can create a new file from a scanned image, but it gives me the error: "The file could not be saved. Unable to open file for writing. It may be locked or unavailable." If I try to APPEND another document to an existing PDF, it gives me this error and will not save the additional scanned pages.

Any ideas on how to regain access to these files?
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Question by:brownmetals
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Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 16511800
Check the properties of the folders, they may have been set to read only. Also make sure you are the owner of the folders and if not, as administrator, take ownership, then you should be able to set the users and groups along with what they are allowed to do with those folders.
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by:brownmetals
ID: 16511930
Thanks for the suggestion. On the server, when I browse the folder properties, READ ONLY is not checked. Howver, when I browse to those folders using the UNC path (\\server\C$\folder) from an XP client machine, the folders ARE marked READ ONLY.

From the client, I'm logged on as an Administrator with the same password that's used on the server. I've tried to take ownership from the client and reassign permissions, but that doesn't seem to be working. Any other thoughts?

J
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Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 1500 total points
ID: 16511988
Try logging on with Domainname\Administrator
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Author Comment

by:brownmetals
ID: 16512097
This is just a member server on a home network - it's not setup as a DC. I don't really have a domain to speak of, just a workgroup. Any other suggestions to try?

Thanks,
J
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Author Comment

by:brownmetals
ID: 16520508
I've been playing around with this some more, and I think that this is a permissions issue. If I copy all the files to my local machine, they are all accessible, none of them are ready only. However, if I create a new folder on the server, and copy them back to the server, the folder is again read only. So, somehow I need to figure out how my client machine can gain access to shared folders on the server.

Here's my setup:

Win XP Pro client machine (logged on as Administrator - same PW as the server)
    Mapped network drives to shared folders - all show as read only

Windows 2000 Member Server (logged on as Administrator - same PW as the client)
     File & Printer Sharing is enabled
     Everyone group is given FULL CONTROL access in the Share Permissions and in the NTFS Permissions

Is there any other setting I'm overlooking to allow the client to have FULL CONTROL access to files on the server? At this point, everything is still read only.

Thanks,
J
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Accepted Solution

by:
rindi earned 1500 total points
ID: 16522418
You have to add the other admin of the XP box to the users of your server, or create a domain so that all that can be centrally administrated. You have a peer to peer network the way I understand, in a peer to peer network you need the users everywhere, making the administration more complicated. You could also activate the "guest" account, but that throws all security overboard...
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Author Comment

by:brownmetals
ID: 16525954
When you talk about adding the "other admin" of the XP box to the users on the server, are you referring to "COMPUTERNAME\Administrator" format? I've played around with this a little before, but it's probably worth another look. Could you clarify that suggestion just a little bit more please?

Thanks,

Justin
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Author Comment

by:brownmetals
ID: 16623006
I ended up ditching the Windows 2000 server an creating a RAID 1 (mirroring) array on my Windows XP Pro box for all the data. This will protect my data from HD crashes. I'll also be able to share it on the peer-to-peer network.

Even though your suggestions didn't get me the exact answer, they were helpful.

Thank you,

J
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