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Is there such a thing as a generic mouse driver?

Posted on 2006-04-24
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Last Modified: 2010-08-05
Hi

I have a friend who has an HP PC and had to reload his os.

He has miss-laid his driver disk and it looks like the mouse is no longer supported by HP.

The mouse is an HP 2 button (3 if you count the scroll button) PS/2 optical mouse.  Does anyone know where a generic driver can be downloaded (prefer at no cost) for Windows XP.

As this is a major inconvenience for my friend this problem is rated at 500 points.

Regards,
Andreas
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Question by:AndreasHagen
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13 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Irwin Santos
ID: 16522884
just plug the mouse into the mouse PS/2 port BEFORE you turn the system on.

should work right off the bat.
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Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16522906
COULD be that the PS/2 Mouse port is blown.  If it's not - and if the mouse is known good, then as long as the mouse is connected when you turn on the computer, it should be detected, as irwinpks suggests.  To be safe, check device manager.  I did see an HP system (server) that was having problems with both the keyboard and PS/2 mouse ports.  Using USB keyboard and mouse worked fine.
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Author Comment

by:AndreasHagen
ID: 16522920
Hi,

We've rebooted it a couple of times with the mouse connected but no joy.  I think the mouse is ok because the laser shines when we turn the mouse over.

A.
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Expert Comment

by:Irwin Santos
ID: 16522927
TURN THE POWER OFF!!!
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Author Comment

by:AndreasHagen
ID: 16522959
Hi irwinpks.  The mouse was connected when the computer was switched off last night.

A.
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Author Comment

by:AndreasHagen
ID: 16522961
Do you still want me to try that?
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Expert Comment

by:Irwin Santos
ID: 16522971
One of the most common problems is that the mouse is NOT in the mouse port.. though the 2 PS/2 ports (mouse & keyboard) look alike...they don't function the same.

Verify that you have this correct.  Sometimes manufactures color code the mouse connector (green), keyboard is purple... make sure green-green, purple - purple.

POWER MUST BE OFF..

then turn on.

Does it work?

if not, boot into SAFE MODE...by pressing F8 upon restart and BEFORE you see the Windows XP Splash screen.

post your results.
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Accepted Solution

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Irwin Santos earned 1500 total points
ID: 16522976
if you have another mouse to test.. attach it to the mouse port.  if that mouse doesn't work, then we can consider leew's comment about a blown mouse port. In THAT case, get a USB mouse as to fix the blown port will require that you replace the motherboard, which may not be feasible.
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Expert Comment

by:PCBONEZ
ID: 16523014
I'm going with previous comments.
PS/2 ports are not like USB ports.
If you connect/disconnect to PS/2 you must be shutdown or you risk blowing out the port with a voltage spike.
In fact there used to be fuses on PS/2 ports to prevent this from happening.
.
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Expert Comment

by:BillDL
ID: 16523371
Andreas

Right-Click on My Computer > "Properties" > Device Manager tab.
Any yellow ! or red X's?  If so, what do they refer to?

Does "Mouse" show in the list?  If so, click the + sign to open it out and it SHOULD show as "Microsoft PS/2 Port Mouse".
If it DOES show, then select it and click "Properties".
Is there a tick in "Disable in this hardware profile"?
If so, untick it and tick the "Exists in all hardware profiles" box.  Click OK and then OK to exit device manager.
What does it tell you under "Device Status".

Open the "Driver" tab and then click the "Driver File Details".
It should show as follows:

|---C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\VMM32.VXD [vmouse.vxd]
|
|---C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\MSMOUSE.VXD
|
|---C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM\MOUSE.DRV

Open the "Resources" tab.  It should show "No Conflicts", using IRQ12, and "Use Automatic Settings".

Let us know what the problem system's settings all show.
I would also like you to do the following:

1. Start Menu > RUN option > and type MSINFO32 > click OK
2. LEFT pane > Hardware Resources > IRQ's
3. EDIT Menu > Select All > Edit > Copy
4. Open Notepad and paste (Edit > Paste or Ctrl and V)
5. back in MSINFO32 open out the "Components" section in the left.
6. Click on "Problem Devices", scroll over and copy any details relating to the mouse > paste into notepad below last.
7. Click on "Input" and do the same for any details about the mouse.

I'm not sure if you are aware, but a lot of hardware settings are stored in a memory chip known as the CMOS which is read by the BIOS as the system boots up.  I've had some problems before where Interrupt Request 12 (IRQ12), which the PS/2 mouse expects to be assigned to, was somehow "reserved" and wouldn't be freed up to allow the mouse to be assigned to it without user intervention.

We can help you check this dependent on what the system details show.
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Expert Comment

by:BillDL
ID: 16523379
Whoops.  The instructions were based on Windows 98.  Forgot I had moved here.
Drivers may be different.  Will need to check after I fire up a WinXP machine, unless another expert can kindly convert the driver details above to reflect those of a Windows XP system.
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Expert Comment

by:rid
ID: 16526917
Most any O/S with a graphical user interface has a generic driver for a mouse... XP shouldn't be an exception here, I think.

Some optical mice seem to take a lot of power out of the PS/2 port, so trying another mouse is a good idea.

Do you get a pointer on screen? If yes, and the pointer can't be moved, the mouse is the prime suspect in my view.
/RID
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Expert Comment

by:Irwin Santos
ID: 16597689
cool.. thank you!
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