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C++ & .NET

dancablam
dancablam asked
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Last Modified: 2013-11-25
If you create a simple C++ program with a GUI interface using the Windows Forms (CLR) instead of MFC, will it require .NET to be installed on each computer in order for it to be able to run? The reason I ask is I would like to get into developing windows Apps using CLR, but I'd be developing software for client computers, and requiring them all to make sure .NET 2.0 is installed in order to use the software wouldn't be feasible. When must a desktop have .NET installed and when can they get away with out it?

Thanks for your help!
Dan
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jkr
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Top Expert 2012

Commented:
>>If you create a simple C++ program with a GUI interface using the Windows Forms (CLR) instead of MFC, will it
>>require .NET to be installed on each computer in order for it to be able to run?

Yes, the .NET runtime environment is definitely required.

>>When must a desktop have .NET installed and when can they get away with out it?

Whenever you want to run managed code. There's no way to get around that, just as you cannot run Java programs without a JVM installed.
jkr
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Top Expert 2012

Commented:
BTW, you can get everything you need from http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframework/downloads/updates/default.aspx ("SDKs, Redistributables & Service Packs")

Author

Commented:
Crap, that's what I was afraid of.

So what would be the best approach for developing software for home and small business users who aren't particularily technically inclined enough to understand how to install .NET? Stick with MFC? VB? Other? What are the pros doing these days?

Dan
jkr
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Top Expert 2012

Commented:
It shouldn't be too hard to integrate the .NET installers you can download from the MSDN page I linked above into your own setup routine. Even when you develop and ship a product using VC++ and 'native' C++ code, you'll have to ensure that the necessary runtime DLLs are installed, so that does not make a big difference (apart from the sheer size of the packages). Not to speak of MFC or VB.

On the other hand, I don't see too many advantages these days that would make me use managed C++ at all if I can avoid it.

Author

Commented:
So with .NET my 1MB program would have to lug around the 25MB .NET installater with it for those without .NET installed?

My final question:
(I'm getting this outsourced because I only know ANSI C++) All things being equal - if you were to create a windows software app for home users, what language would you most likely use?
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Top Expert 2012
Commented:
>>So with .NET my 1MB program would have to lug around the 25MB .NET installater with it for those without
>>.NET installed?

Yup, that's the deal. That does not really matter if you ship on a CD, but can be a pain if you need to download it and don't have broadband.

>>if you were to create a windows software app for home users, what language would you most likely use?

Me, personally? C++, unmanaged ;o)

If it only is about a simple GUI, probably even without any libraries, plain Win32 APIs. If things get more complex GUI-wise, I'd probably go for either MFC or wxWidgets (www.wxwidgets.org).

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Commented:
Thanks a million!!!!
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