DNS problems with Windows XP Networking

How can I get all the computers on my peer to peer home network to show up in Network Neighborhood?
I have two desktop machines wired to a linksys router and one laptop connected wirelessly to the same router. All machines are running Windows XP. Netbios over TCP/IP is enabled on all machines. All firewalls have been removed. When the IP addresses are determined with DHCP from the router, the computers do not appear in network neighborhood. I can access them with the IP address, but not with the netbios computer name. The Computer Browser service is active on all machines.

When I use static IP addresses for all the machines, everything resolves fine. But I would like to have the computers use DHCP from the router, and receive broadcast netbios.
gf1212Asked:
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adamdrayerCommented:
Try running nbtstat -n to make sure they are registering their name properly.  Then download and run browstat to determine whether or not the 3 computers agree on who the master browser is.  Also traverse the event logs for any netbios errors.

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Craig_200XCommented:
Make sure all client are LOGGING on - install client for microsoft networks in lan adapter properties.

http://www.vuse.vanderbilt.edu:8888/es130/appendix/network%20neighborhood.html

http://forum.homenethelp.com/Readme_for_Computers_that_don'_t_show_up_in_Network_Neighborhood/m_3895/tm.htm

or

if its a small network add ipx/spx protocol to each machine.
Craig_200XCommented:
copy that entire link on the second one to your browser to hit that page...
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adamdrayerCommented:
I do not agree with the recommendation to install IPX/SPX.  This protocol is primarily used for Novell NetWare networks, and in order for NetBIOS to function properly, you would need to install install NWLink.  It is bad practice to have more than 1 NetBIOS transport installed on a computer, and makes it harder to troubleshoot as well.  If there are any firewall or connectivity issues that are causing the problem, then IPX/SPX would not fix it anyway.  NetBIOS over TCP/IP is all that should be needed

The first step should be to make sure that NetBIOS is functioning properly on each computer and then determine whether they are in the same broadcast domain.  Once we are satisfied we will look at software or hardware that may be blocking the transmissions.
Craig_200XCommented:
Adamdrayer, actually, I found it works quite well, despite your statement. yes it installed nwlink automatically, but it did solve the same problem. And on a small network its fine as far as multiple transports are concerned - performance differences are not noticeable. Can you explain what you meant by harder to troubleshoot?

adamdrayerCommented:
Having two active transports can result in fractured browse lists, as well as multiple points of failure.  Both make it more difficult to troubleshoot.  

All extraneous networking protocols should be removed for performance issues, even if you do not notice them.  There is no need to run IPX on a network that does not require it.  IPX connectivity in general can be harder to troubleshoot since the bulk of NetBIOS and networking tools available to windows users are designed for TCP/IP.  There are also more internet resources and more experts on the subject.
gf1212Author Commented:
Using nbstat -n, each computer is registering its name as well as the workgroup, but no other computer on the network. How do is use browstat to determine if the computers agree on the master browser?

All the clients are logging in. All computers are in the same workgroup.
Craig_200XCommented:
type the following command: browstat status or just browser to see the lists.


http://www.chicagotech.net/browser.htm
adamdrayerCommented:
what's the model of the router?
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