• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1913
  • Last Modified:

Cleaning up Active Directory

I inherited an Active Directory environment.  I went to verify/check the replication status using REPLMON and added the monitored servers.  When I expand the Schema partition, I see a number of servers that were deleted.  I assume they were domain controllers and were replication partners at one point.  Using ADSIEDIT, I wanted to see if there was a way I can delete the entries I found in REPLMON for "DELETED SERVER #_" but I don't see any entries.  I need to upgrade the domain controllers to Windows 2003 but I'm asked to clean up AD before doing so.  Does anyone know how I can remove the entries in Active Directory for the "DELETED SERVER #_" so they do not show up any longer?  I appreciate your help!!

0
tbaik
Asked:
tbaik
  • 5
  • 4
1 Solution
 
MereteCommented:
Hi
I believe this may assist you as you state  have already been deleted
Please read on from my extract as it is illistrated:

Problems Caused by Deleted Routing Groups
When routing groups are deleted after servers are moved out of them or for other reasons, WinRoute may display the text "object_not_found_in_DS" for the objects.

Exchange servers maintain the link state table that still references the objects, but these objects are missing from Active Directory when the routing engine service initializes and checks Active Directory to find the related objects.

Exchange routing cannot automatically remove deleted routing groups and their members (that is, servers and connectors) from the link state table. In fact, routing treats the deleted routing groups no differently than existing, functional routing groups. In rare cases, deleted routing groups can cause a malfunction in routing as well as mail loops. Deleted routing groups can severely affect topologies in which an Exchange 5.5 site joins an Exchange 2003 organization.

Additionally, these deleted routing group objects may significantly contribute to the size of the link state table, and thereby increase the network traffic that is incurred in the exchange of link state information.

Finally, if the Personal Address Book (PAB) or Offline Address Book (OAB) has a legacyExchange domain name that matches a deleted routing group, the deleted routing group objects will cause mail that is sent to non-existent users from the PABs or OABs to be added to the messages with an unreachable destination queue. After the default timeout of two days, the mail will be returned to the sender with a non-delivery report (NDR). Without the deleted routing group object, mail sent to non-existent users will immediately be returned to the sender with an NDR, instead of being added to the queue first.
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/exchange/guides/E2k3TransnRouting/3b8f9926-cd5b-4642-ad7e-3bc5df2ee885.mspx?mfr=true

let me know if it is enough
Merete
0
 
tbaikAuthor Commented:
I understand that this may be the case for Exchange servers in an Exchange organization but this is caused by deleted/removed Windows 2000/2003 domain controllers that were replication partners with the current domain controllers in production.  Exchange servers do not show up in REPLMON (as far as I know), so this doesn't have anything to do with Exchange routing groups.  This is related to Active Directory replication.  I appreciate your feedback.
0
 
haim96Commented:
0
Restore individual SQL databases with ease

Veeam Explorer for Microsoft SQL Server delivers an easy-to-use, wizard-driven interface for restoring your databases from a backup. No expert SQL background required. Web interface provides a complete view of all available SQL databases to simplify the recovery of lost database

 
tbaikAuthor Commented:
I performed all of the procedures in this document as well, but still the **DELETED SERVER #__ object shows up in REPLMON.  Is it possible that what I'm seeing in REPLMON are tombstoned or orphaned objects?  
0
 
haim96Commented:
yes ... it could be.
another method (but very not recommended) is to reinstall the server with the exact same name
and then demote him with dcpromo.this proccess should remove the server clean and nice.
0
 
tbaikAuthor Commented:
I'm not sure if this would work because the new server would have a different GUID, and I wouldn't be able to DCPROMO the new server down unless I used DCPROMO to make it a domain controller to begin with, which wouldn't do a thing for the ghost objects.
0
 
haim96Commented:
of course that you need to promote him to DC before demote ...  :)
and if you thing that it's only ghost object it will be better ignore them.
0
 
tbaikAuthor Commented:
So you're suggestion will do absolutely nothing to clean up Active Directory...how are you helping?
0
 
haim96Commented:
about tombstone in AD :
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/248047/en-us

and about deleting items from AD:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/230113/en-us
0
 
tbaikAuthor Commented:
Your suggestions didn't quite clean out the "ghost" objects in Active Directory, but I appreciate your effort.
0

Featured Post

Has Powershell sent you back into the Stone Age?

If managing Active Directory using Windows Powershell® is making you feel like you stepped back in time, you are not alone.  For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why.

  • 5
  • 4
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now