Kicking a Cash Drawer in a Server 2003 Environment / Net Use

I'm trying to kick a cash drawer in a server 2003 environment with remote clients (XP Pro).  Here's my configuration:

Cash drawer is attached to a host PC as COM4 (Generic/Text Only driver - shared out).  It's remapped to LPT2.  S/W is installed on a File Server running Server 2003.  It's set to kick the cash drawer on the host PC on LPT2.  So far so good.  The s/w can kick the drawer on the host pc.  

I need to (per the s/w developer)  map the remote PCs' LPT2 to the host PC, which I do by issuing a "net use LPT2: \\pcname\printershare /Persistent:yes" command.

The cash drawer is kicked by sending a Ctrl-G command.  At a command prompt I issue Echo [ctrl-g]>lpt2 and nothing happens.  When monitoring the print queue on the host PC I see the "print job" come in from the remote PC, but it fails and I have to cancel it.

I've tried setting the print properties on the host pc's Generic print driver to print directly to the printer (no spooling).  This is when I get an Access Denied on the remote PC when I issue kick drawer command.  I do not get prompted for a username/password.  All users are part of a single domain.  I think I'm failing in one of two areas but am not sure:

1) All of these user accounts have "user" privileges.  I'm not sure that I can map a local printer port (LPT1) to a remote PC unless the user has admin rights.  This is what prompted me to use LPT2 and not LPT1 (even though there is no local printer attached to LPT1).  If this is the case then how do I get around it?

2) I have granted full rights to the users who I want to access the shared printer on the host.  This had no effect.  Just for testing, I made the host pc and one remote clients administrators (not a live environment yet) to see if I could get past the access denied - no change.  Is this a local policy issue on the host pc?  This wouldn't make sense to me since local policy is overridden by domain policy.

Thanks

spenadelAsked:
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Netman66Commented:
Try this:

Install the printer on the remote PC as a network printer using the same drivers as the Host and connect it to the Host queue.
Share it locally with an 8 character sharename (or less).
Issue a net use LPT2 to the locally shared printer.

Let me know.




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spenadelAuthor Commented:
This is an interesting approach.  I did try, at one point, to install the cash drawer on the remote PC as a network printer.  I didn't try to share it locally, and the share is less than 8 characters.  But I'm confused on this part.

With the printer installed as a network printer, what will issuing a net use command on the same PC accomplish?  It would appear that I'm still trying to send, from a DOS level, the kick command to the host pc.  Having the print driver (as a network printer) on the remote does what?

I won't have a chance to do this until tomorrow.
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Netman66Commented:
Having the share 8 characters or less makes it 8-dot-3 (DOS) compliant.  Is the sharename on the Host longer than that?  Perhaps that's all it is.

Making LPT2 map locally rather than across the network allows the 32-bit subsystem to handle the cross-network delivery rather than relying on the 16-bit subsystem (which is quirky at best for network shares).

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spenadelAuthor Commented:
Ah, the delivery makes sense.  The share is 4 characters so as to make is DOS compliant.  I'll report back.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Just checking... do you have file and print sharing enabled on the host computer?

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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spenadelAuthor Commented:
Yes, file and print sharing is enabled on the host computer.
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spenadelAuthor Commented:
Netman66 - adding the networked printer from the host had no effect on the remote trying to kick the drawer.

TechSoEasy - At the administrative level file and printer sharing is switched on.  The PC firewall is also set to allow file and printer sharing.  I can add the host printer on the remote - no problem.  I've even explicitly granted access rights to the cash drawer from the remotes that need access.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Why don't you still try enabling file and print sharing below the administrative level just to see if that makes it work?

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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spenadelAuthor Commented:
At the "user" level there's no tab to turn it on.  I did get it to work finally, but here's what I had to do.  

Based on the software developer's request, I changed the Generic print driver from being set on LPT2 to COM4.  The drawer is attached to COM4 and I had redirected LPT2 to it.  The developer suggested that I leave the port redirection alone, but just change the local port assignment on the driver.  

He also said that (and this is where it gets ludicrous) in his test environment he set all "remote" PCs to have full administrator rights on the PC and in the Domain.  Not wanting to do that for obvious reasons, I started testing with one remote PC's rights.  I rejoind the Domain and set the local rights to Power User.  No change in drawer us.  I repeated this and set it to local Administrator rights and tweaked the Generic driver to spool print jobs and have the user print directly to the printer.  That allowed me to send a DOS echo command to kick the drawer.  However the latency from issuing the command to kicking the drawer is 9 seconds.  Not sure why that's taking so long yet.  Thoughts on this?
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GranModCommented:
Closed, 250 points refunded.
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Windows Server 2003

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