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Installing and seting up raid 1

Posted on 2006-04-27
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I have a HP server running windows server 2000, I have two identical 80gig hard drives in it. I want to setup and use
raid1. I already have the hardware controller in the server. My primary drive has information on it, but the second drive is blank, i want to use the second drive to mirror the primary drive. How do i go in to the computer and tell it to do so?? And will i lose any data on my primary drive? Do both drives have to be blank to do this?
Anyone who can help or guide me through this would be a great help!!
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Question by:lsimmons85
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by:rshooper76
ID: 16555235
I would get a ghost image of the drive.  Then I would go into the array controller and setup the array.  Many times when you create an array like this it will create a new partition, thus causing you to loose your data.  You can then restore your ghost image and be back up and running.  I would look at the documentation for the array controller as well.  If you tell us the exact controller that you are using maybe we can give you a better answer.  Regardless of the array I do it this way just to be on the safe side and to make things easier.
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by:lsimmons85
ID: 16555447
What is the best way to ghost an image of the drive?? And you mean ghost an image of my primary drive? I will try to find out what kind of controller i am using
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by:rshooper76
ID: 16555488
Get Symantec Ghost, and create a ghost image of the drive onto a spare drive.
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by:lsimmons85
ID: 16555521
And does that software help you restore the image back to the drive??
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by:lsimmons85
ID: 16555561
I think the controller is a Adaptec AHCI Serial ATA HostRaid, but i am not sure. What is the best way to find out what it is?
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by:lsimmons85
ID: 16556468
And i have also heard that Symantec Ghost does not work very well with Server 2000..... What is your opinion on it?
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by:Brick-Tamland
Brick-Tamland earned 300 total points
ID: 16557144
I would first make a backup.
Then move your partition to a third temporary hard drive.
I would use Partition Commander (www.v-com.com) it is compatible with Windows servers and RAID systems. Once you have your partition moved. Configure your RAID container and move the partition back. I have used this technique several times to change RAID configurations and never had a problem.

Watch the computer as it is booting. It will tell you the model of your RAID controller right before it says “Press Ctrl-A to access the configuration utility”
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by:rshooper76
rshooper76 earned 300 total points
ID: 16557209
I have used Symantec Ghost on Windows 2000 Server without any problems.   I currently use it on all of my servers, both Windows 2000 and Windowds 2003.   You simply create an image of the drive on a spare drive, create your array, and then restore the image to the drive using Ghost.  The concept with either Ghost or another similar program is the same.   Before you setup an array in your machine, you need to be familiar with it so that you know what to do when you have any kind of failure.
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scrathcyboy earned 400 total points
ID: 16557648
In theory, as long as the drive with info is the master, and the blank is slave, it should clone without losing the data.  But the trick is to set up the RAID 1 in the BIOS without INITIALIZING the raid, i.e. just choose the RAID 1 choice, and make sure you do not check any boxes to "initialize" the RAID -- in theory it will just start cloning drive 1 to drive 2.  The problem comes in that many RAID controllers force an initialization at the start, without you knowing it, and in a few seconds, all is gone, from DUMB illogic.

SO rather than get steeped in ghost, which costs you money, why not just copy all data from one drive to the other, and then, if you can, backup the system settings to a CD file, this way you can recover all if it gets wiped out by bad BIOS illogic.  There are many ways other than buying ghost to make sure you have a reporducible HDD backup, the problem is, getting it installed on a bootable drive.  Do you have a smaller drive you can just copy the OS files to, and backup the rest to CD-DVD?
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