[Webinar] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
?
Solved

One PDC and one SBS on same network. Will SBS disconnect after 14 days?

Posted on 2006-05-01
7
Medium Priority
?
448 Views
Last Modified: 2008-02-01
Continous from http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/SBS_Small_Business_Server/Q_21829562.html

OK. You said that if my old Windows Server 2003 PDC is still connected to the network 14 days after I connected the SBS, the SBS will shutdown? This is not an "if", this is something that actually going to happen? I have no plans putting the clients to the new server within those days. So, how do I fix this? I can always disconnect the SBS from the main network again and reuse the old dhcp-server? :-). Do I get new 14 days after reconnect?
0
Comment
Question by:dingir
  • 3
  • 3
7 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:cmmeier
ID: 16586003
From http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;884453

The following conditions must be true after you install the new SBS 2003 computer in an existing domain or the new SBS 2003 computer may display warnings and shut down periodically:• The new SBS 2003 computer must be a domain controller that is installed on the root of the domain.
• The new SBS 2003 computer must hold all the Flexible Single Master Operation (FSMO) roles.
• The new SBS 2003 computer must be a global catalog server and must be the licensing server.
• There must not be any existing domain trusts or child domains.
• Only one SBS server can exist on the domain. If SBS 2003 is installed, no other SBS 2003 or 2000 server can be installed on the same domain.
Failure to meet these conditions may cause the SBS 2003 server to shut down.
0
 
LVL 74

Accepted Solution

by:
Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy earned 2000 total points
ID: 16588965
Here's the problem with your scenario... your old server is in a separate domain... but it IS a Global Catalog Server and Licensing Server... to be honest, I've never seen this scenario because it can be avoided with the appropriate planning.  So, I can't confirm for sure whether or not the SBCore Service (which is what causes the shutdown) will react to the server on the other domain.  

But, I'm not really sure that is relevant... because I still don't undestand your migration plan.  Since you can't have trusts with SBS, your users will not be able to access both servers without a separate login each time they access something from the other domain.  Generally, you would either follow the Microsoft recommended migration (as shown here: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/sbs/2003/plan/gsg/chptr3c.mspx) or if you absolutely require everything to be up, then you need to follow the Swing Migration Method (found here:  http://sbsmigration.com).

Those are really the only options, and if you continue down the path that you are currently on, there's no telling what can happen... and if I were in that position, I'd be a bit concerned about that.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:dingir
ID: 16594397
Hi TechSoEasy!

Thank you, so if I ask this: Can I ever have an another Windows 2003 Server on the same physical network as a SBS 2003? You answer me yes, but they can't be used from same user logons, wich means that they can't share resources.

This scenario is a result of paying an expert for guidelines, who told us that we could have a Windows Standard 2003 as a DC under an SBS 2003 (as an pdc). And also having difference domainnames to avoid conflicts with DNS, than set the Windows 2003 Server under same domainname as the SBS after reinstall. I think that I from now handle this migration by myself, and instead give points to you nice guys :-).


That link you gaved me is about upgrading to SBS 2003. This SBS server is a whole new server, this isn't an updgrade. The old Windows 2003 Server is about to being disconnected and later be reinstalled. There's no explicit requirement that having both servers up. But if we are recommended not using it in same physical network as the SBS 2003, I really don't know what to do with it - except selling it to someone :-). Maybe we are sooner as ever thought having an own webserver.

And yes, I'm a little bit concerned.
0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy
ID: 16594879
No, I didn't say that about the additonal server 2003.  You absolutely CAN have another server, or many other servers if you like and they will share logons as long as they are in the same domain.  The problem you currently have is that you are running two domains.  This "expert" did not apparently know that migrating to SBS requires a fair amount or precision.

You absolutely CAN use your other server 2003 as an additoinal domain controller as well.  Please see http://sbsurl.com/addserver for more details.

Yes, sorry I pulled the wrong link... that's for in-place upgrades.  You need to see this paper: http://download.microsoft.com/download/6/d/c/6dccf9b4-d915-4c95-b5af-100b89e02add/SBS_MigratingSBS2k.doc which is titled "Migrating from Small Business Server 2000 or Windows 2000 Server to Windows Small Business Server 2003"  However, it also would apply to migrating from Windows 2003 Server to SBS, since you most likely have been running your Server2003 in non-native mode anyhow.  (Meaning it was emulating Server 2000's attributes).


At this point, I would disconnect your SBS and get your network stabilized back to the way that it was.  You then have two choices...either follow the paper I've linked above, or go with the www.sbsmigration.com Swing method.  I highly recommend the swing method because it gives you much more flexibility in your migration.  

Whatever choice you make... you really need to map out a migration plan.  Fill out all the worksheets that are included with either set of documents (see the last few pages of the paper I linked above for that solution's worksheets).  You also need to create a scheduled plan of how to move over the assets of the existing network.  Delving into a migration without a written plan of action will innevitably cause you much grief because you can easily get lost in the process since there is a lot to do and the order it's done in is very important.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:dingir
ID: 16595297
TechSoEasy
Thanks. It's looks like an good idea to disconnect it at once, I'm not spare that much having them in same domain. Just access to the network-printers that I've already installed. I will look at adding an server later, when it's time for it - thanks for the link :-).


Wow! Yes, this is something for anyone who works 40 hours a week with network-solutions :-). Or have a level of experience of it (paying some expert). I mostly learn by do in this area. How about that I disconnect the old Standard 2003 instead, and beginning from scratch with SBS (which was my purpose from beginning). ..That I manually transferring the private documents and databases, and reinstall the used softwares and all that. I'm not sure that I want any configuration at all from the old server, just only the software and documents being used in the company.

As a phase 1 it's only important that the users can have thier new logons, thier documents as before, accessing there daily-work-software and also thier Outlook (configured for Exchange mailbox instead of local .pst files).
0
 
LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy
ID: 16595576
If that's the case, then you can definitely just migrate by hand.  My basic rule of thumb is any network with less than 15 users, I will migrate manually... I figure that it takes just as long to manually move up to 15 workstations/users as it does to do a swing migration.

So, this is what you will have to consider for the migration:

Email:  Do you currently have Exchange installed on the old server?  If so, you need to use Exmerge to migrate the mailboxes into .pst files and then you can migrate them back in to the new server. (howto: http://www.petri.co.il/brick_level_backup_of_mailboxes_by_using_exmerge.htm)

User Documents:  If these are currently on your Server 2003, just leave them until you have everything configured.  Once you have the workstations removed from the old server's domain (they need to be unjoined back into a WORKGROUP) then you just demote the old server and put it in workgroup as well.  Once you've added all the users and workstations to your new SBS, you just connect the old server to the network and allow it to get an IP address.  Then you can just share the root of it's data drive and access the files to copy them to the SBS's User's Shared Folders directory.

Local User Profiles:  These will automatically be migrated AS LONG as you unjoin the workstations prior to disconnecting the OLD server 2003.  If for some reason they are not available when you connect the workstations to the new SBS Domain with http://<servername>/connectcomputer, then you will need to follow the steps in the article I had posted for you in your previous question:  
http://www.certmag.com/articles/templates/cmag_howto.asp?articleid=819&zoneid=91

Line of Business Software:  What all are you running on the server level?  Please advise, as there may be issues here that need to be reviewed.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:dingir
ID: 16603303
TechSoEasy
Interesting. Nice tips, I wrote them up and also checking that SBS document. At this place I'm pretty sure making this works (until I stand there and doing it) ;-). I will do a new plan for transfer data to the new server, setting enough time to it. It's just two things left that I need to figure out. One thing depends on a programmer of a websystem.

The other is the AD. I need a completely new AD who works with our organization, who expanded from 8 users and 1 office to 25 users and 2 offices since the born of this old server. http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/SBS_Small_Business_Server/Q_21836214.html. If this question is possible to answer.

Line of Business Software
On server where running an application for administration, webbapplication for consultants, an database-application for marketing. It's better reviewed in the link above.
0

Featured Post

Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This guide is intended for migrating Windows 2003 Standard with Exchange 2003 to Windows Small Business Server 2008. You will need the following: Exchange Best Practice Analyzer: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=DBAB201F-…
If you are a user of the discontinued Microsoft Office Accounting 2008 (MSOA) and have to move to a new computer running Windows 8, you will be unhappy to discover that it won't install.  In particular, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Express Edition (SSE…
Integration Management Part 2
Despite its rising prevalence in the business world, "the cloud" is still misunderstood. Some companies still believe common misconceptions about lack of security in cloud solutions and many misuses of cloud storage options still occur every day. …
Suggested Courses

865 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question