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Windows 2000 Server is very slow

I have a server Xeon 3.2 GHz with 4 GB RAM
Oracle 9 i is installed over it .
It becomes frequently very slow ..even I can not open windows explorer
But when I stop the service of oracle svr becomes okey

Can it be a virus or somthing with oracle service

Server also runs IIS
All windows updates are there in place . Trendmicro office scan is antivirus.

Plz. Help

Thanks
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rahulbagal
Asked:
rahulbagal
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1 Solution
 
ravindran_eeeCommented:
May be Oracle is not configured.. Please check ur initialization parameters and optimize the same to perform better for ur server configuration
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actonwangCommented:
How much memory used while your oracle is running?

could you list server parameters?
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rahulbagalAuthor Commented:
Oracle is Configured properly . .... It was working nicely before few days ...there are two database each uses abt 130 MB memory on average.
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actonwangCommented:
any long session running inside? any job running inside?
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actonwangCommented:
try look at v$session to identify any active session running.
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schwertnerCommented:
Is it on Windows/2000?
I have the same issue and had to bounce Oracle weekly.
This desapears after moving to Windows XP.
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Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
A Windows server with 4GB of RAM running two separate Oracle instances (databases) is likely to be slow, especially if it also has to run non-Oracle programs or processes (like: IIS) at the same time.  You indicated that each instance uses only about 130MB of RAM.  Is that the total SGA size for each instance, or where/how do you see that value?  If that is the total SGA size, then the buffer cache is only part of that, and if the size of the databases on disk is larger than 100MB, the server may be very busy doing physical reads of disk blocks into memory in response to queries.  How many disk drives does the server have?  Are these SCSI disks?  Do they use RAID?  If so, what level?  Or do you have a NAS or SAN?  Where is the Windows swap file (on the same disk as Oracle data files, or not)?  Have you checked the Windows Performance Monitor to see if the main bottleneck seems to be: memory, CPU or disk?
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schwertnerCommented:
This is IA-64 bit Xeon architecture and it has to run fast even you run many products on it.
But 130 MB for Oracle instance is too small. Try to extend the SGA of every instance to a value near 600MB extending Data Buffer Cache and Shared Pool primerly.
Check network speed problems 10 instead 100 MB Ethernet, check the Wait events either with Toad or Oracle Statspack tool.
Investigate the applications: do they use Bind variables? If not - set SHARED_CURSORS to SIMILAR in SPFILE.
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rahulbagalAuthor Commented:
thanks for overwhelming response.
I am still trying .
I have observed one more thing when Server is too slow even to open windows explorer when I pull out lan cable . immediately it becomes ok .. Can there be a network worm which can lock out resources ?
Even though the Server is slow Processor uses is not more than 20% .
schwertner & markgeer
can you please guide me how to extend the SGA size. I am a newbie in oracle

thanks
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schwertnerCommented:
Windows Server 2000!
I had same problem but with 100% CPU loading.
No escape, no fix, nothing helped!
Only rebooting the machine once weekly!
Suddenly returnung from business trip to Germany I
found in my office a new Windows XP professional box
and the boss smilling said to me: " Migrate Oracle to this box!".
After that I have no problems with Oracle instances on Windows!

Also will strongly recommend to use 9.2.0.7, i. e. to upgrade the version.

One possibility to change the SGA components size is Oracle Enterprise manager.
Log as SYS user and go to the the Database. You will see the Memory allocation.
See also the advisors from the left (for db_block_buffers and shared_pool).
They will say you what to do.
Extending the SGA needs also change of sga_maxsize, sga_agregate_size (look for the exact name in the parameter section in OEM) and also rebouncing of the instance.
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Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
A newbie in Oracle running two separate Oracle databases on one Windows Server that also has to run IIS?  Yes, you will have some challenges!

One of Oracle's biggest advantages is the fact that it is so tunable (for different hardware, database size, application type, numbers of users, etc.).  But one of Oracle's disadvantages is that you have to tune it!  The default settings that the installer gives you will usually not be optimized for your hardware or intended use.

Where to start?  Oracle's SGA size is determined by values in the initialization parameter file.  Prior to 9i, this was an "init*.ora" file.  They can still be used (and you will still see lots of references to an "init*.ora file) but with 9i, the default is an "spfile" (or server parameter file).  The advantage of the "spfile" is that it allows a lot more of these settings to be changed "on-the-fly" that is, without having to do an Oracle shutdown and restart to re-read an init*.ora file.

The single most important change you will likely make is the value for: "db_cache_size".  You want that high enough to keep as much of the database in RAM as possible, but without foricing the O/S to start swapping memory out to its swap or paging file.  You may also have to set the value for: "sga_max_size" to a larger value to accomodate a larger "db_cache_size" value, since the db_cache is just past of the total SGA.

This is much easier with just one database on the server, and with the server dedicated to Oracle, that is, not running something else like IIS at the same time.  With 4GB of RAM on a Windows server, and one Oracle database, I would want the total SGA to be close to 2GB, and the db_buffer_cache the biggest component of that probably around 1.5GB.  This assumes of course that your database files on disk are larger than that!  If your database is smaller, you don't need a large buffer cache.

Your situtation is complicated by the second Oracle database and the fact that IIS is also competing for memory.  You will have to use the Windows Performance Monitor to check the memory and page file utilization, and make sure that you do not see excessive page file activity when you make the Oracle SGA larger.
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rahulbagalAuthor Commented:
markgeer & schwertner  ,
Thanks a lot for explaining all this in laymans language .
Doing all this server was slow only .
mean while I observed >> when I give netstat on command prompt I saw lot of connections between my this 9i server & a another Application server ..
Then I stopped all services of my oracle Including oracle listener. then it works fine .

Finally I took a bitter decision  I removed oracle 9i & Installed 8i . now it is running well .

Thanks a lot for your kind help.

still I have one more problem
plz. look into it if you can .
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Databases/Oracle/Q_21849193.html


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