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Have some new email (and replies) with standard text at the top

Greetings,

A law firm would like to have emails to clients read "Privileged and Confidential Attorney-Client Communication" at the top.

This would be on both new messages and replies so I don't think stationary will do the trick.

The banner needs to be on only messages to clients so there would need to be a way for the user to choose whether to include it or not.

Any idea how to do this?

Thanks
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sactotex
Asked:
sactotex
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1 Solution
 
David LeeCommented:
Hi sactotex,

Are they using Exchange or internet email?

Cheers!
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upul007Commented:
If you use Outlook with word as editor - you can create two signatures and have the user select which one to use. The signature can be created with your phrase and the other without. But it will be a manual process. Also you can have this displayed on new messages as well as replies and forwards.

Also rather that having two sigs, you can have one and get the user to delete the phrase for other emails. Highlight and delete.

Is the above what you require?
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David LeeCommented:
upul007 is correct, but you can't enforce a signature.  Hence my question.  If you are using Exchange, then there are third-party tools available that can enforce disclaimers/banners in messages.  If you're not on Exchange, then there are a variety of ways of adding disclaimers/banners, but they aren't enforceable.  Staff could turn them off, avoid them, forget to use them.
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sactotexAuthor Commented:
Sorry for the long delay in responding.  Things got hectic.

BlueDevilFan - Not Exchange.  They use Communigate.  The server is unix (OS X) so there are a dozen ways to do it on the server but they are very specific that the user needs to make the decision whether or not to include the banner.  Implying there is a attorney-client relationship with someone who is not a client is a Bad Thing(TM) I am told.  OTOH they have a client who requires the banner at the top of all messages and freaks if it isn't there.  I asked if it would be OK if I automated adding the banner for only certain email addtresses but again they insisted the user had to make the decision on a email by email basis.

upul007 - A signature is the obvious technique but I really don't want to use it because I am old school enough to want a sig delimiter.  IK,IK.IAAPW.  That might be the best solution.

My other thought was a keyboard macro.  That might be the best solution since they can use it in other applications.

I have read, and vaguely remember, nifty things you can do with custom forms.  Is that not the solution for this problem?
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upul007Commented:
sactotex, agreed. BlueDevilFan may be able to create you something similar to a keyboard macro. You press the keys on a new message and presto! the phrase appears.
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David LeeCommented:
There are a couple of ways to handle this.  First, and simplest, is to create and use Outlook stationery.  The stationery would include whatever text you need.  The text would be fully formatted.  You might even have several different stationery files with different text.  When creating a new message the sender would select the appropriate stationery.  Stationery files can be managed centrally and copied to the attorney's computers whenver a change is made or when a new stationery is added.  Two, use a macro.  The macro would stuff the text into the keyboard, essentially acting as if the attorney were typing it.  It would be unformatted text and would appear wherever the cursor was when the attorney fired the macro.  Macro's cannot easily be managed centrally.  Installing/changing them could require a visit to each attorney's computer.  

Let me know how you'd like to proceed.  If you want to go with a macro solution, then I can put that together for you.  If you want to use stationery, which is what I'd recommend, then I can point you to some resources that describe how to make stationery.  Creating stationery is very simple and can be done with any tool that edits HTML, although personally I'd recommend staying away from using Word.
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sactotexAuthor Commented:
BlueDevilFan - I didn't think stationary could be used with replies.  That was my second thought, after a signature with a mess of blank lines at the top.

How would you do the macro?  If you did it in VB or something similiar could you have it paste formatted text?

Everyone - Thanks for all your help.
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sactotexAuthor Commented:
upul007 - I think you might be right about using a signature block.  I checked several messages that I have received and didn't see anything delimiting the signature from the body.

The only problem is that on replies you would have to move the quoted text below the banner.  I don't know if a macro or moving the quotes would be better.
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David LeeCommented:
> I didn't think stationary could be used with replies
You're right, it can't.  Sorry, I was just thinking of new messages.  

> How would you do the macro?
The macro would use the SendKey command to stuff the keyboard.  I suppose it's possible to produce formatted text that way, but I believe it'd be difficult.  Everything typed into the editor is taken as a part of the message.  It's impossible to type formatting into the editor.  For example, if we type <b>Some disclaimer text</b> into the editor we get that litteral string of text in the message, not Some disclaimer text in bold.  It might be possible to work out a way to simulate mouse clicks to activate/decativate formatting options like bold, italics, colored text, etc., but I think it'd be difficult at best.  Also, Outlook's object model doesn't give access to the cursor's position, so the macro would insert text where the cursor was at when the macro was run.  

Another possibility would be to include some replaceable text, or perhaps set some sort of disclaimer indicator and have a macro that replaces/inserts the text as the message is sent.  
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upul007Commented:
Hi sactotex, you are in good hands and I know that bluedevilfan is in a better position to help you than me. So bowing out of this question. Good Luck!
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sactotexAuthor Commented:
upul007 -  Thanks for helping out.

BlueDevilFan  - I would love the macro.  It looks like the best we are going to get.
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David LeeCommented:
Ok, here's the code.  It's very simple.  Follow these instructions to set it up and use it.

1.  Open Outlook.
2.  Click Tools->Macro->Visual Basic Editor.
3.  In the left-hand pane, if Modules isn't expanded, then expand it.
4.  Click on Module1.
5.  Copy the code below and pate it into the right-hand pane of the VB Editor.
6.  Edit the disclaimer text.  The {ENTER} sequence sends the cursor to the next line.
7.  Click the diskette icon on the toolbar to save your changes.
8.  Close the code window.
9.  Click Tools->Macro->Security.
10.  For this macro to work you'll have to set the security level down to Medium.

To use the macro

1.  Create, reply to, or forward a message.  
2.  Position the cursor where you want the message to appear.
3.  Click Tools->Macro->Macros.
4.  Select this macro and click Run.

If you need multiple disclaimer messages, then simply duplicate this macro as many times as needed giving each itteration a different name.  Edit the message text of each one.  The user can then select which message to insert.

Sub Disclaimer()
    Dim strMessage As String
    strMessage = "Disclaimer line 1.{ENTER}Disclaimer line 2.{ENTER}Disclaimer line 3."
    SendKeys strMessage, True
End Sub
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sactotexAuthor Commented:
Dave,

Thank for your help and sorry for abandoning this.  We are now deciding if we are going to use Thunderbird instead of Outlook.  If we stay with Outlook we will definitely use your macro.

Thanks again.  I really appreciate your help.
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David LeeCommented:
No problem.  Thanks for the note.  Let me know if there's anything else I can do to help out.
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