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Exchange Offline Address Book attribute change



Here is our scenario;
We purchased our current Exchange server from a third party vender, and everything is working fine, however we'd like to make some changes.

This is our issue. Since we purchased our current server from a third party, there are still some remnants left behind from this third party company. For example, the Offline Address Book attributes still displays the third party company name, /o=some_company_name. We'd like to change it to our_company_name

Also, this attribute shows up in a couple of other places, in our SCHEDULE+ FREE BUSY folder in Exchange System Manager as EX:/o=some_company_name, and in our address book in Outlook in all email addresses.

All company email is delivered to user@our_compnay_name.com, and everything is working fine. We just don't want to see this some_company_name attribute anywhere in our directory.

Can this value be changed easily without any serious repercussions. Thanks,
John


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yubacitykingsfan
Asked:
yubacitykingsfan
1 Solution
 
amaheshwariCommented:
You can do this by following this MS article:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=871132
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yubacitykingsfanAuthor Commented:
We don't have any of the symptoms described in the article. Our primary SMTP address is working fine.
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rakeshmiglaniCommented:
you can delete the the OAB folder and Free/Busy folder and then re-create them using the following Kb article

How to reset system folders in Exchange Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/822444/en-us

Schedule+ Free/Busy System Folder Is Missing
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/284200/en-us

I don't know what there will be any repercussions....
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SembeeCommented:
I don't think you are going to be able to change those elements without a complete reinstall of Exchange. Those are system settings.
To put it another way - I wouldn't dream of even attempting to change them. If a client asked me to change them then I would tell them that it would require an export of data, removal of Exchange, including stripping it out of the domain. Once it is flushed, reinstalled with new information.

Simon.
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yubacitykingsfanAuthor Commented:
Simon, so what you are saying is that deleting and re-creating the OAB folders according to the above article (How to reset system folders in Exchange Server 2003) is not really a viable option for us? After reading the article, it doesn't appear to correspond exactly to what we are attempting to do.

What exactly do you mean by Exchange system settings, and not being able to change them without a complete re-install?

John
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SembeeCommented:
The OAB just pulls information out of the Exchange server. Therefore recreating the OAB will do nothing for you.
 
The settings that you want to change are core to the Exchange server. They are used throughout the server to identify and label components and parts. It is difficult to explain more, other than to say that to change them would mean Exchange being removed totally, stripped out of the domain so that it can be all installed fresh.

I don't know what third party you purchased the machine from, but as an implementer myself I wouldn't dream of giving a client an Exchange server with my own information all over the configuration.

Simon.
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yubacitykingsfanAuthor Commented:
I would tend to agree with you on this because I've been having a hard time finding anything documented by Microsoft on this particular issue.  

Thanks,
John
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yubacitykingsfanAuthor Commented:
Simon,
I totally agree with your answer but my director is asking if you can steer us to any kind of articles, papers or Microsoff docs relating to this issue. I do appreciate your insightful responses.

John
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SembeeCommented:
I am not aware of anything because what you want to do is uncommon. It is where someone like myself (with my consultant's hat on) would be brought in to tell you these things based on our experience. Or you would call Microsoft and ask them.

There are many things about Exchange that just are not documented in anything straightforward. What you are trying to do is rename the Exchange org and its identification. That is just a big no-no.

However it comes down to things like this...

http://blogs.msdn.com/mattwag/archive/2004/12/10/279723.aspx

"...the customer also wanted to test renaming their Exchange organisation to their new company name.  This can not be done.  Let me say it again... you can not rename an Exchange organisation and any hacks are not supported. "

This is probably the closest I can get from Microsoft: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=842116

I stress that there is no complete article on what you can and cannot do. Don't take the contents of the KB article as gospel - the fact that the article doesn't mention something, doesn't mean it or cannot be done.

If you aren't prepared to take my word for it, then you will have to call Microsoft and pay their fee. They will tell you once and for all if it can be done. Make sure that you have a good backup before doing anything.

Simon.
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yubacitykingsfanAuthor Commented:
Thanks Simon. I'm going to close this out. Your website is great by the way.

John
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