Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 646
  • Last Modified:

Market Share of UNIX and Win2K or Windows

Is there a good website out there that can give me information regarding the current market share of UNIX and Windows operating systems?  
0
Higante
Asked:
Higante
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
PsiCopCommented:
Mebbe, but you need to understand that any numbers you find will have little value. Why?

1) Redmond reports practically every PC shipped by practically every major computer manufacturer as a Windoze install - because they have managed to threaten/cajole/strong-arm all of them to including Windoze with systems, whether or not the purchaser needs or wants it. Even if the purchaser formatted the hard drive and installed Linux as soon as they got the PC (like I did), Redmond is quite content to count it as a Windoze install. The result? Their numbers get inflated.

2) Windoze server environments typically require 2x to 3x as many servers as other NOSes (e.g. Linux, UNIX, NetWare) to delivery X services to Y clients. So if a company with, say, 3000 client workstations needs 10 NetWare servers to deliver all their networked services to those clients, they'd probably need 20 to 30 Windoze boxes to deliver those same services to the same client population. However, if you define "market share" as number of servers installed (as Redmond happily does), then Windoze would appear to have 2 or 3 times the "market share". And never mind it doesn't serve more than 3000 client workstations. So be very careful how you define "market share". Most sources define it in terms of total number of server boxes, which is very misleading when you consider how hardware-inefficient Windoze is.
0
 
HiganteAuthor Commented:
I have read websites that I think give inaccurate numbers that as you said, inflates the numbers in favor of windows.  I know some organizations use Linux and almost half of their PC's are already running the OS.  It is already almost impossible for me to believe that what I'm seeing on the internet is actually accurate.  
0
 
giltjrCommented:
From what point of view are looking at?  Are you only interested in Unix and Windows?  Are you including "Linux" in the Unix world, or do you just want "UNIX" (IBM's AIX, HP's HP-UP, Sun's Solaris, ect).  What about the BSD's?

Are you counting OS's installed or machines they are installed on (meaning the virtual world)?  IBM has a licensing agreement where for one price you can have as many Linux servers on one of their Blade Center.  You could have 14 blades running 2, 4, 8 virtual images each, but this only counts as a single Linux license.  Better yet on IBM's mainframes you license Linux based on the number of  IFL's you have.  A single IFL can support mutliple Linux images.  There are some sites that have 4 IFL's and are supporting hundreds (500+) Linux images.

Are you looking at file serving or application serving?  Depending on the application a single IBM mainframe can easily support thousands of users, where that may take a couple Unix (RISC based boxes), 10's of Intel based running Linux or NetWare, and 20-30 running Windows.

0
Concerto's Cloud Advisory Services

Want to avoid the missteps to gaining all the benefits of the cloud? Learn more about the different assessment options from our Cloud Advisory team.

 
HiganteAuthor Commented:
giltjr,

I see your point there...I would say I'd prefer rather get information regarding UNIX in general.  However, I do have the impression that Linux is 'unix-like' in terms of its kernel, etc.  As far as BSD, yes...so overall...who does have the upper hand in marketshare?  My guess is UNIX may be almost neck-to-neck with win...
0
 
giltjrCommented:
Over all Windows is really a winner hands down in the pure number of OS's installed.  However that is because of the servers to desktop ratio.  Even in the largest of corporatsion that use mainframes and RISC boxes as the core/mission critical platforms for the applications and infrastructer, they also use Windows on the destkops.  There are probably thousands of desktops for every server in the world.

Even if you look at the server maket only it would be tough.  Unix had a big head start on Windows and Unix is generally used in large companies and were cost is a major factor.  Smaller companies like to use Windows because they can use the same tech people for the desktop as they do the OS.  If you have a small enviroment the knowledge to manage a server is not that much differnt managing a desktop.  At one time Netcraft (www.netscraft.com) showed that 80% of all web servers were not only running Apache, but they were also running Unix like OS's.  Windows started to gain as it became less espensive for smaller companies to host their own sites and, but in the Internet world "Unix" still rules.

Mainframe are on their way back (they actually never went anywere). There is one ISP that replaced 750 Unix servers with one IBM mainframe (an older z/800), they ran 750 virtual servers.  I heard that they had to go from a 2-way to a 4-way because they are now running 1500 virtual servers.  The users can't tell the difference between their virtual image and an image on real hardware.  Because of the licensing for support this originall counted at 2 Linux support licenes and now as 4, not 1500.  However places like Netcraft would show them as 1500 indvidual servers if they were all web servers.  They aren't they are DNS servers, Web Servers, FTP servers, mail servers, virtual routers, etc.

With virtualization becoming more pratical on smaller boxes  now this like this well be more common as smaller companies will be doing the same thing.
0
 
PsiCopCommented:
Apache still runs 3 websites for every 1 website run by IIS. Source: Netcraft.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now