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Connected IDE Drive to IBM X205 but no love

We have an old X series 205 Server using SCSI disks

bought a 200Gb IDE drive for storage but no matter what we try the machine only sees 130Gb and by default tries to boot from the IDE drive!

any suggestions, tried BIOS updates, checked everywhere in the bios for boot priorities and now we are stumped!

any ideas?
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Jay_Jay70
Asked:
Jay_Jay70
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2 Solutions
 
_Commented:
You could try getting a PCI IDE card to hook the drive to. This will let the system see the 200gigs, and it sounds like the system won't try to boot from it. Make sure boot is turned off in the card bios. But you also need the OS to have 48-bit addressing to see it also.
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Jay_Jay70Author Commented:
Gday Coral,

its an option for sure, but i am struggling to understand why it doesnt work as is! the machine is old but no ancient and i know that you can have IDE and SCSI on the same board together
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_Commented:
From what you said so far, it sounds like the BIOS can't handle hard drives over 130gig, even with a BIOS update. If I guess AWARD BIOS, would I be correct?

It also sounds like you don't have much in the way of setting your boot order, so it is going to the IDE when it finds one. Did you try making it a Slave? Putting it on the secondary IDE channel?
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Jay_Jay70Author Commented:
you would be :)

IBM in their infinite wisdom seem to customise the BIOS to their spec which to put it bluntly is crap. I think you would be correct with your size limit assumption, and the board is old enough that it only has one IDE channel

we tried everything! making it slave, trying to hide it etc, but the board defaults to IDE boot no matter what,

you reckon its just one of those things we accept as a no go?
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_Commented:
>> just one of those things we accept as a no go? <<  Probably. Unless you want to see if the PCI card will fool it. As long as it is set to "Do not Boot" drives connected to it, the IDE drive should be hidden until the OS drivers kick in. <crosses fingers>

>> you would be <<  Yeah, Award is not usually known for having alot of bios options (though they are getting a little better), and add IBM on to that... well, enough said.   : D
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Jay_Jay70Author Commented:
spewin ey, ill leave this open for a little bit just to see if there have been any other attempts at a similar thing,  otherwise its an attempt PCI card or an adapter to make it a NSD and we shall see

thanks for your help :)
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_Commented:
Sounds good.  : )
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garycaseCommented:
There's one thing missing from this discussion:   What OS are you running?   In addition to requiring a controller that supports 48-bit logical block addressing, your OS must also support it, or you'll only "see" 137GB of the disk, no matter what you do.

First, since you said you are "... struggling to understand why it doesnt work ...", let me explain the underlying issue here:   When drives started using logical block addressing (WAY back when they exceeded 8GB), they used 28 bits for the address.   So the largest drive that could be addressed was 2^28 blocks * 512 bytes/block = 137,438,953,472 bytes  (nominally referred to as 137GB -- or, in "computerese", 128GB).    This is the limit you are currently encountering.

In many cases, the BIOS does not support drives beyond this limit; but you can overcome this by simply using an add-in controller card WITH 48-bit LBA support (this is important; many add-in cards do NOT have this support).   Here's a good card that DOES support 48-bit LBA addressing:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16816102027
Note that you can sometimes overcome this limit with a BIOS update IF the IDE controller can support 48-bit addressing.   But an add-in card is the "safest" way for an older system.

However, your OS must also support 48-bit LBA addressing for this to help.  With XP, that means at least SP1.   With Windows 2000, that means at least Service Pack 2 (which also requires a registry modification) or Service Pack 3 (which includes the registry modification).

One other simple way to overcome the addressing limit:  mount the drive in a USB external enclosure with 48-bit LBA support.   Then you won't need an add-in card.   But, as with the card, you need to be sure the enclosure has 48-bit LBA support.   Here's a nice enclosure that meets this criteria:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817145225

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garycaseCommented:
... the external case suggestion does, of course, presume that you have USB ports on your X-Server :-)    (or you could add a PCI USB card)


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dooleydogCommented:
when you use IDE and SCSI together, there should be a bios setting to tell your system to use SCSI to boot.

IF you cannot read all 200 GB using hte on board IDE, you may need to get an Enhanced IDE card that will allow you to see and use the whole drive.

Good Luck,
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Jay_Jay70Author Commented:
Thanks all for the input looks like im off to buy a PCI card and have a play, also have network adapter for it on the way so we shall see how that works

shall bump the points up so you both get something worth while :)

Coral and Gary thankyou both, basically things like this jsut reaffirm my distaste for IBM products and their limited capabiliies

Thankyou Again and Happy Experting

See you boys around
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Jay_Jay70Author Commented:
Thanks all for the input looks like im off to buy a PCI card and have a play, also have network adapter for it on the way so we shall see how that works

shall bump the points up so you both get something worth while :)

Coral and Gary thankyou both, basically things like this jsut reaffirm my distaste for IBM products and their limited capabiliies

Thankyou Again and Happy Experting

See you boys around
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_Commented:
Thank you much.    : )

Something I thought of last night. The PCI card might also have a jumper to Disable its BIOS.
I know some of my SCSI card do, as well as not having a BIOS ROM at all. No way you can boot from them, since the OS has to be loaded for them to work.

If you get the chance, I would like to hear how it works out.   : )
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Jay_Jay70Author Commented:
shall let you know what we manage, drives in an Xseries206 at the moment and all seems to be well, PCI Card will be purchased in the next few days i hope
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