Multiple users after SBS2003 Migration

I am in the process of switching an org from a peer network with a Windows 2000 Professional box running as a file-only server.  Many of the workstations under this environment were running with 2 main profiles, using fast switching to allow for multiple logons, after which they could access their file share via user name and password.  When the same workstation is logged onto the SBS 2003 domain, fast switching is now disabled, 'by design', as Microsoft puts it.
Q1:  If USER1 has logged on, and left the area without logging out, how can USER2 get access to the PC, without the intervention of USER1 or an administrator?
Q2:  If the answer to Q1 is 'not possible', is there a viable solution, via 'training' or otherwise?
Q3:  Is using roaming profiles a possible solution, where USER2 is then able to logon elsewhere?
Q4:  Any other tips or ideas?
DanMan06Asked:
Who is Participating?
 
Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Q1:  By default, users have local administrator priveliges on each machine.  So, unless you've manually modified this, they are able to log the other person off with CTRL-ALT-DEL.

Q2:  It is possible.  But remember that if the other person forces a logoff then there could be data loss if something was opened and not saved.

Q3:  I don't suggest that you use roaming profiles... but if you use My Documents Folder Redirection, (wizard in the Users section of the Server Management Console). Then a user CAN log on to any other machine and they will be able to access their files.  Outlook is automatically configured on any machine that a user logs into.

Q4:  Yeah, tons.  Start by reading http://sbsurl.com/techguide then post back any questions you may have.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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ZadkinCommented:
> Q1:  If USER1 has logged on, and left the area without logging out, how
> can USER2 get access to the PC, without the intervention of USER1 or an
> administrator?
A hard reboot

> Q2:  If the answer to Q1 is 'not possible', is there a viable solution,
> via 'training' or otherwise?
It seems by design as there is no auto log off feature in the Power Options, probably due to the "Do you want to Save" question.

> Q3:  Is using roaming profiles a possible solution, where USER2 is then
> able to logon elsewhere?
Yes,  but I think the My Document Redirection is already enough.

> Q4:  Any other tips or ideas?
Allas
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DanMan06Author Commented:
Jeff:

Your response was thorough and concise.  The link in Q4 is truly appreciated.

Dan
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
No problem... I might also warn you that there is a widely held belief (not based on any scientifically collected data, mind you) that it takes three SBS installs to get it "right".   So I'd suggest that if you are a Microsoft Partner and have the Action Pack that you do a couple test installs first.  (You can easily do this with either Virtual PC or Virtual Server 2005 on any machine that is already running.)

If you aren't a MS Partner or do not have the Action Pack, please see https://partner.microsoft.com/40009735 for more info.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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DanMan06Author Commented:
This  is actually my second install, and having learned what not to do on my last network, I am more interested in what to do, and how to implement properly.  I have yet do an install here at the office with my Action Pack; I didn't realize that I could install one of the Virtual packages on an existing PC.  Is it actually possible to install SBS2003 Premium onto an existing XP Pro PC, and have it work?

Dan
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
Yes, totally!  I run demos of SBS Premium on my laptop.  But you have to have enough RAM (I have 2GB on the laptop) and I'd suggest using Virtual Server instead of Virtual PC... because it runs as a service that way.  I also put my Virtual Images on a 100GB mini-USB hard drive (along with a copy of Virtual Server) so I could actually just plug the drive into any machine and have a server up and running in about 10 minutes.... including two virtual instances of XP Pro to demonstrate both a LAN workstation and a remote connection.

Remember, you aren't actually installing SBS2003 Premium onto "an existing XP Pro PC" when you use a virtual environment... because the Guest operating system doesn't actually see what the Host OS is ... as long as you can run Virtual Server on the machine, then you can install SBS.  

And while it's not a supported scenario... you proabably could run the SBS Virtual Image on Virtual PC 2004 on a Mac!

Jeff
TechSoEasy

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