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How to assign T1 fixed IP address to individual port on a Switch ?

Hi,

We have an T1 internet connection installed in our office. The T1 line is connected to an 5-Port Switch so we can use the 5 difference fixed IP address. Is there anyway we can assigh each fixed IP to each individual ports ? For example, port 1 will be 69.72.33.10, and port 2 will be 69.72.33.11 something like that. We only want each port can only get 1 fixed IP even we connect another switch on Port 1. We want each port can only has 1 IP address no matter what kinds of devices/computers connect to it and the IP cannot be changed. Is that possible ? and what kind of devices I should use ? I must use the 5 public fixed IP address and cannot use NAT or any internal address.

Thanks.
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infotechnetwork
Asked:
infotechnetwork
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1 Solution
 
ISoulCommented:
What kind of switch is it?

I have strong doubts that what you're describing is possible.
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infotechnetworkAuthor Commented:
I am just using an Linksys 5-Port Switch. I don't mind change it to any other kinds of switch or router as long as it will do what we want.
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sunilcomputerCommented:
You cannot assign individual IP on the ports of a switch.
You can only assign IP to Entire Switch.


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sunilcomputerCommented:
You can purchase any Cisco router having four Ethernet Ports.
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Thanatos2kCommented:
What applications are running that eliminate NAT as an option?

Using NAT, you could use a private network (192.168.1.x) and then map with NAT the 5 public IPs to the 5 machines that need to be accessed from the outside. The rest of the machines that don't need incoming access can be set to share one of the IPs for outgoing access. If you need to change which machines need incoming access, it is one-click simlpe to change one of the NAT maps to point to a different machine.

The only way I can think to do it without NAT is going to require a custom built Linux router with 6 network interfaces (1 WAN / 5 LAN), and is significantly more comlpicated that using NAT, and will require many hours of some lucky consultant's time. I suspect it would cost quite a bit more than simply ordering a block of 32 static IPs from your ISP. ;-)
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liamkellycabraCommented:
could you do with some simple guild lines, I hope you don't find me patronising.

sounds like you have a new connection to your office

To use this you need to:

connect the new line to a Router (any type - but Cisco are not very plug-and-play so you may want to avoid) with a suitable interface (T1) using cabling like this http://www.pacificcable.com/Picture_Page.asp?DataName=7150
the router will need to be configured with suitible IP address for the WAN connection and the Lan connection. If you do not know the correct IP address and subnet mask for the WAN then I suggest you consult the provider (If your connecting the internet) or admin of the far side of the connection ( if you connecting too a broader corporate network). The IP address and subnet mask for the LAN should be decernible from the Current devices located at your site.


Connect the Router to your switch via the ethernet ports on each device using Cat5 cable (you may need to use a crossover cable)


Liam

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Titanium_SniperCommented:
Each computer on the switch will get its own IP address, If you use Nat then you can have more than 5 computers. With your 5 computers you are connecting, you can set them with static IP addresses because you will be recieving those 5 IPs from the ISP, only the ISP or the computers may assign the IP addresses. There is no reason to have another switch attached because without NAT, you may only have 5 computers on the internet at a time, each with one public IP address.

With NAT you may have 5 networks on the internet at a time, you can configure the NAT devices(usuallay routers) with static IP addresses per computer or let the ISP pick for you with DHCP. This way you will have 5 Public IP addresses but have as many computers as your bandwidth will allow on each of those 5 networks. You can THEN use the router to assign IPs to the computers with whatever rules you want, First come lowest ip; Assign by mac; Or if supported by the nat device, assign by port although i have never seen assigning by port before.

Good luck.
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Viper2299Commented:
Assuming that the five addresses you have been given are in the same subnet, (as shown in your question), this is not possible on a router.

You cannot assign IP addresses to Layer 2 (switch) interfaces.  An IP can only be assigned for the managemant vlan of the device (usually vlan 1).

You cannot assign IP addresses of the same network/subnet to multiple interfaces on a router.

Seeing that NAT and internal addressing are out of the question, the only option is to configure the 5 devices directly connected to the switch with the 5 Public addresses, and the switch will not receive an IP address (since it is only needed for remote management purposes.)


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rickyclourencoCommented:
Sounds like I agree with Viper...

I would configure the Router connect that to the switch, then configure each Server with the external IP addresses directly...

Server1 = 69.72.33.10
Server2 = 69.72.33.11.....etc
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Thanatos2kCommented:
It sounded to me like they have more than 5 computers that they want to be able to access the internet, just not all at the same time as NAT isn't an option. They wanted to limit each port of their central switch to 1 active internet connection (thus 1 IP) so each of the networks attached to each of the 5 ports would have 1 IP available to the first machine that requested it...

I think we need some clarification from the asker here...
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rickyclourencoCommented:
To tell you the truth, its actually more confusing now that I re-read through it.  Because they want a fixed IP by PORT, so say for instance you put a Server on Port1 one day, then the next day you put lets say a workstation there, they want ANY equipment you put on a specific port, to take the IP address designated to THAT particular port....

I don't know!!
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infotechnetworkAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all your suggestion. I think I need to make the question more clear. What happen is we are going to build a new office building, the building will have 5 individual offices. We are going to use one office and the other 4 will be lease out to the other 4 difference companies. Our location can only use T1 for internet connection (NO Cable, NO ADSL). We agree (5 offices) to share the T1 line and each office will has one public IP address. We don't want any office get more than 1 IP address by mistakes. So is it possible ?

Thanks.
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Thanatos2kCommented:
In that case, you simply disable DHCP on your T1 router, assign each company one of your static IPs and then they can do with it what they please. Most will probably just buy a standard Linksys router and run NAT for internet access. Basically, you are acting as an ISP and their single static IP will function just like a cable/DSL single IP connection; they can plug 1 machine in at a time or use a standard cable/dsl router to share that single IP with all their computers.
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