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Replicate with pfmigrate while replication is running?

Have a newinstalled Windows 2003 with Exchange 2003 and wants to replicate public folders from the old mailserver windows 2000 with exchange 2000.

I have started the replication through ESM , but it is soooooo slow and have now read about "pfmigrate" and want to use it instead. Is this possible if I have started the ESM-replication? Should the ESM-replication be stopped before?

another question, once I have replicate the public folders I suppose the replication runs by itself, I mean if a user changes someting in a folder on the old server it will also be changed on the new one, right?

Thanx in advance..
 
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Handersson75
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Handersson75
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SembeeCommented:
And now with my expert hat on...

Pfmigrate is not the magic tool that everyone says it is. It is just a scripts that allows you to configure the replication of public folders in one hit, rather than having to set it on each folder individually.

However.
Replication off Exchange 2000 public folders is very slow. Get used to it. My record before doing it manually is three weeks. I usually leave it at least a week before I get worried.

Very rarely will you see the status as "in sync" either. I tend to go by the item count to see if things are in sync. If it is one or two out, then it is good to go.

Simon.
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Handersson75Author Commented:

So you mean that pfmigrate is not at good option to use? As I understand it replicate you folders in just a few seconds.... You should not recommend me to use it? I guess that i need the replication to be finished before I begin to move the mailboxes also, or?
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SembeeCommented:
I am not saying that pfmigrate is not a good option to use. It certainly does make life much easier. However it isn't the magic tool to speed things up. That is an inherent problem with Exchange 2000. I suspect that it is bandwidth conservation which is a bit too conservative to the point of not doing anything. Remember that Exchange 2000 is over six years old and was designed when 10base networks were common.

Simon.
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Handersson75Author Commented:
I have now created a user in AD with mailbox on the new server. If i log in to OWA and browse public folders I am able to see all the folders... Do I see the folders on the old server or has it been replicated already?

Second question: I expand ESM and click the public folder and it asks me for a username and password, why?
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SembeeCommented:
To check the public folder status, you need to look in ESM, Servers, <your new server>, <your storage group>, Public Folder Store, Public Folders. That will show you what public folders are on that machine.

However, the fact that you can browse the public folders doesn't mean that they have replicated. Outlook/OWA goes looking for public folders that are not on its local machine. That is no good for you, as you want to remove the server.

You shouldn't get a prompt for username and password. Public Folders uses OWA, so that would indicate something isn't right there. Make sure that integrated authentication is enabled on the /public virtual directory in IIS Manager, and if you are using SSL, basic authentication is also enabled.

Simon.
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Handersson75Author Commented:
If I want to use the new server, is it possible for me to move the mailboxes and start using it even if the public folders is not replicated? I mean if I keep the old server up and the users use the "old" public folder until it get replicated... If it possible to axess it while replication?
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SembeeCommented:
In theory it is possible.
However you will often see a performance hit. Remember it isn't just the public folders, but also the system folders. Outlook references the system folders frequently, and if the content isn't on the server where the mailbox is located, it goes looking for it.

I have certainly done mailboxes first, but as a rule do not, because I feel the performance hit is not something I want to live with. I specialise in doing transparent migrations - where the user community doesn't know anything has changed until we (the client and I) are ready to tell them.

Simon.
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Handersson75Author Commented:
I have a network with 30 clients and we use the public folder almost only to have a public calendar... So the perfiormace should not be any problem ...

Is it any other thing could go wrong if i start using the new server?
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SembeeCommented:
Backups and free/busy information spring to mind.
If you invite each other to meetings then if the free/busy system folder is not replicating then you may not have accurate information for doing the invites.

Simon.
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