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System State restore with different mass storage hardware/driver.. possible?

Posted on 2006-05-20
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Last Modified: 2013-11-15
Folks,  I've been bashing my head against this for like two months.  I'm super frustrated!

I've got a PC running SBS 2003.  I call this the "original system".  I want to restore it to a different PC with an adaptec 1210 SATA controller (so I'll have RAID-1, mirrored drives).  I call this the "destination system".  That SATA (mass storage) controller is the real problem, eh?  

I know -- I could swing it, but this experiment is meant to teach me how to recover SBS installations *IF* one of my clients' servers fails/is-stolen/is-watered/etc..




Here's what I've done:

1)  Make a full backup of the original system - including System State and Exchange and everything on the C: drive.  Including my half dozen exchange users, it's about 15 GB of data.

2)  Install SBS on the destination system from CD media.  Yes, I have to "F6" to add the adaptec driver from floppy during this installation.  Works just fine.  I let it do the whole SBS installation.

3)  Bring destination machine's O/S up in directory restore mode.  Restore all the C: file system data and System State into the machine.  This over-writes the machine's drivers.  Once I re-boot, the Adaptec drivers are *GONE* -- so the machine blue screens and reboots itself.


I've been told that I can "add" the adaptec driver to the existing O/S installation by doing an "in-place upgrade" or "repair" install.  I can't figure out how in the heck to do that.  I do this:

A)  Boot the destination machine, after the system state restore, from SBS CD 1 and press F6 to add the adaptec driver.  Add the adaptec driver (2003 server certified version, v1.00) from floppy.  No problem-o.

Next Prompt:
- Setup Windows Now, Press Enter
- Repair using Recovery Console, press R
- Quit, F3

B)  I press enter to setup Windows.

Next Prompt:  License junk.  I press F8 to agree.

Next: System looks for previous installations of Windows.  Finds the existing partition, which is expected.  My choices are:

- Setup Windows on the selected item (partition), press Enter
- Create a partition (left some of the disk unused), press C
- Delete the selected partition, press D

I press enter, to setup windows.

SBS pukes this error/warning at me:

You chose to install Windows on a partition that contains another O/S.  Installing Windows on this partition might cause the other operating system to function improperly.  Caution:  blah, blah, blah..

- To continue Setup using this partition, press C.
- To select a different partition, press ESC.

I press C.

At this point, I'm obviously not going to do a repair or in-place upgrade installation.  










I swear, I've poked through this process for like 6 hours, about a dozen times.  I can't see any way to repair/upgrade the installation to get that adaptec driver installed.

How on earth can I install this driver?  I know a little bit about the recovery console.  I know how to edit text files.  Don't fret about pointing me to complex solutions.  *ANY* solution will make me happy!


Argh!  

Really Frustrated,
-- Scott.


*boing!* -- if I install the driver into the "original system" -- even though the hardware does not exist in that machine, will the driver get backed up and restored into the "destination system"..?  

This thing is murder.  I wish I could assign like 8000 points to this.
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Question by:scdavis
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by:Robberbaron (robr)
ID: 16726304
I think you ARE going to to do an in-place upgrade after the Press C to continue to use this partition.

And probably installing the SATA driver to the original system will work but have never tried that.  I seem to recollect doing something similar for printers with XP boxes. (Pre-install printer drivers)
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by:scdavis
ID: 16726317
robber,

I haven't tried it, but the installed clearly states that I'll destroy user accounts, etc.. etc..    Sorry, but I think you're incorrect.

I guess I could try it -- I mean heck, I've re-installed this "destination" machine like 15 times already.  One more won't hurt.

Will let you know soon!

-- Scott.
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by:jm-johnmeyer-us
ID: 16728299
Hate to bring bad news but you can't 'restore' an MS OS onto a different motherboard / hardware system.  By design, there is no way to do it.  When the OS is installed it detects the mother board and binds various components at the level of the hardware abstraction layer, and there is absolutely no way to change this.  MS did this to prevent piracy -- imagine if one could download completely built out operating system images from the Internet and then place them on any hardware one so desired -- there would be no way to control piracy.

The MS approved way to do this type of migration starting with SBS would be to upgrade to regular Windows 2003 server, install Windows 2003 with all the apps on the second machine, then migrate the Active Directory to the second machine, the migrate the file sharing and apps to the second machine, then decommisssion the first machine.  This would be prohibitively expensive in both time and software costs.  (You can't put SBS on two machines on the same network).

I recently saw something in a Virtual Server whitepaper about using RIS to move servers into virtual server, which is the only exception to this rule which up until this point has been ironclad.  Virtual server uses 'virtual' hardware devices so perhaps it can be configured to simulate different types of hardware. Generally, windows cannot be migrated to new hardware without rebuilding the configuration from scratch.


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by:scdavis
ID: 16728391
John,

I'm a little confused.  I've seen posts all over the interweb that refer to the "repair/inplace upgrade" installation.  Y'all have any idea why my media (SBS 2003 open license - standard edition) does not give me that option?

I mean, heck, if I can't restore the system state to a different hardware platform, what's the point of even giving me the option to back the silly thing up..?

I'm really not happy about this.  As far as I can tell -- my first, significant problem to making the attempt work is my mass storage driver.  


Anyone know anything about how to manually install drivers into the O/S?  I installed the driver into another test lab machine and found the registry changes it made (i.e. a service, an ENUM thing and a class thing..).  *IF* I could get that data into the "destination" machine's registry and put the actual driver file in the "drivers" folder, is there any hope it might work?  

I'm sure I've seen bootable tools (linux based?) that'll let me muck with the registry..  Guess I should try to find 'em again.


Thanks, Folks!
-- Scott.





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by:jm-johnmeyer-us
ID: 16728887
The design is such that you cannot change the mass storage driver without actually having the OS up and running.   Even if you were able to get the driver working, the O/S would still fail on boot.

The sole purpose of system state backup is to restore after a storage failure.
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by:scdavis
ID: 16729770
Well..  I'm going to have a few beers this evening and see if I can jam the driver into it.  Will let ya know if it works.

-- Scott.
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by:jm-johnmeyer-us
ID: 16730909
It'd be great if it does.  I have 6 servers to move onto virtual server and I'm about to pay someone to figure out the RIS migration toolkit thing.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy earned 2000 total points
ID: 16737090
There are specific restrictions on installing to new hardware as described in http://sbsurl.com/backup

But I'll list them here for simplicy's sake.  The following must be the SAME as the original server:

•SCSI controller. You can restore to a computer that has an IDE controller if the original computer had SCSI.
•Motherboard chip set.
•Number of processors.
•Hard disk size. The new computer’s hard disk should contain matching volumes the same size or larger than those on the original computer.
•Drive letter of the boot partition.

If any one of the above is not compliant, then you'll get a Hardware Application Layer error-- BSOD.  I've been experimenting a lot with Virtual Servers but haven't actually moved a live server into a Virtual Space... sounds interesting though.  A Virtual Server image can be run pretty much anywhere as long as you have the .vhd file and either Virtual Server 2005 or Virtual PC.

I do know that you can use something like Symantec LiveState Recovery to restore an image to different hardware without any problem.

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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by:scdavis
ID: 16739577
Jeff,

I haven't taken the time yet to read that particular document, but I'd like to thank you for being specific about what the system looks for to determine that it should BSOD.  

Additionally, it sounds like you might have tried to actually implement this before.  

I'll check out the Symantec product.  Thanks for the tip about that!

Best,
Scott.

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by:jm-johnmeyer-us
ID: 16739753
Scott, sorry my post did not save you any time yesterday.  
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by:scdavis
ID: 16740195
Jeff,

I just skimmed the manual for the Symantec product.  It just deals with the "microsoft?" term "bare metal recovery".  

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/products/symantec_livestate_recovery/3.0/manuals/userguide_server.pdf

On page 100, it states something to the effect of..  recovery to failed disks.  (no mention of chipset, CPUs, etc..)

It then further states in the glossary -- that a bare metal recovery only deals with failed disks.


So, I've not used the product, but I think I should go on record as saying..  that I doubt the product can restore an image to different hardware, unless that hardware is the same drivers for all those system components as the oringnal hardware.


Again, Thanks VM, guys,
-- Scott.
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by:Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasy
ID: 16751008
Well, "bare metal recovery" is not exclisively a Microsoft term... that's a generally accepted term to mean complete disaster recovery.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bare-metal_restore

Jeff
TechSoEasy
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