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How to setup DNS Server?

Posted on 2006-05-21
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How do I setup a DNS Server?

I have a small computer network at home, and I want to setup one of my Windows 2003 computers as my DNS server.
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Question by:Axter
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by:stafi
ID: 16729905
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by:Axter
ID: 16730005
I just tried above instructions, but I can't seem to ping the newly created DNS.

How can I verify that the DNS is working?
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16730199
Can you ping it by IP Address?  What is the exact error message?  What are your DNS servers set to on the machine you are pinging FROM?
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by:Axter
ID: 16730241
I tried pinging ont the 2003 machine, and I get the following:
C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>ping 192.168.0.200

Pinging 192.168.0.200 with 32 bytes of data:

Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.

Ping statistics for 192.168.0.200:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16730295
Hi Axter,

is that machine on the same subnet? do you have any firewalls enabled?
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16730524
Note: I also asked you
What are your DNS servers set to on the machine you are pinging FROM?

What version of 2003 is this?  R2?

Do you have a software firewall on it?  Perhaps the Windows Firewall?
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by:Axter
ID: 16730821
>>is that machine on the same subnet?
>>do you have any firewalls enabled?

I don't have firewall enabled on any of the machines.
The only firewall I have is on the cable router, and all the machine are behind the firewall.
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by:Axter
ID: 16730827
>>What version of 2003 is this?  R2?
Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition, Service Pack 1
(No R2)


>>Do you have a software firewall on it?
No
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by:Axter
ID: 16730833
>>What are your DNS servers set to on the machine you are pinging FROM?

I'm trying to ping from the same machine that the DNS is on.
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by:Axter
ID: 16730839
What should the DNS IP settings be for the Windows Server 2003 machine that is acting as the DNS server?
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16730842
> I'm trying to ping from the same machine that the DNS is on.

So?

Doesn't mean that you've got the right settings in your DNS

What are the DNS servers set to?

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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16730843
are you able to ping the client machine from your server
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by:Axter
ID: 16730984
>>are you able to ping the client machine from your server
No
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by:Jay_Jay70
Jay_Jay70 earned 400 total points
ID: 16730996
can you post an ipconfig for both server and client
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by:Axter
ID: 16731018
>>What are the DNS servers set to?

Here's what my DNS server is set to:

DNS
 |
  -->DAVID2k3
       |
        -->Forwarders (192.168.0.1)  //This is my cable router IP address
       |
        -->Forward Lookup Zones
              |
               -->axterdomain  (axterdomain.dns)
                    |
                     -->Name      Type      Data
                    |
                     -->(same as parent folder)      Start of Authority (SOA)      [1], david2k3., hostmaster.
                    |
                     -->(same as parent folder)      Name Server (NS)      david2k3.
                    |
                     -->intranet      Host (A)      192.168.0.200
                    |
                     -->Solaris9      Host (A)      192.168.0.210
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by:Axter
ID: 16731024
>>can you post an ipconfig for both server
Here's the server:

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.13
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
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by:Axter
ID: 16731028
>>can you post an ipconfig for both server and client

Linux Fedora doesn't seem to support that specific command, and I'm not sure what is the Linux/Unix version of it.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731031
We need a FULL IPCONFIG - type IPCONFIG /ALL annd copy and paste that.  

Linux, the command is IFCONFIG
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16731034
ahhh linux... im out of here now, not going to waste your time throwing things at you as i have no idea with linux
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731049
Also, how is the linux system configured?  DHCP or sTatic?  if Static, you need to specify the name servers in /etc/resolv.conf
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by:Axter
ID: 16731074
>>ahhh linux... im out of here now, not going to waste your time throwing things at you as i have no idea with linux

Alright, lets keep it simple.  I just booted up another windows Server 2003 (This is an R2).
And I just tried ping the domain, with no success.
This is what i get with ipconfig:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.19
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
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by:Axter
ID: 16731079
Here's the ipconfig all for the server:
Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : david2k3
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VIA Rhine II Compatible Fast Ethernet Ad
pter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-13-8F-48-A5-89
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.13
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 68.87.64.146
                                       68.87.75.194
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, May 21, 2006 10:01:24 PM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, May 21, 2006 11:01:24 PM
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by:Axter
ID: 16731092
Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : davidr2
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . :
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . :
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel 21140-Based PCI Fast Ethernet Adap
er (Generic)
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-03-FF-4E-A5-89
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.19
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 68.87.64.146
                                       68.87.75.194
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, May 21, 2006 10:01:49 PM
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Sunday, May 21, 2006 11:01:49 PM
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731103
Thank you, now I think I see your problem.

1.  The server should be set with a STATIC IP address.
2.  The servers DNS servers are NOT correct.  You want the server to run your DNS, right?  Well, when you lookup an address, the server is using 68.87.64.146 first.  Your server's IP address, 193.168.0.13 isn't even listed as one of it's DNS servers.  Unless it's listed, it will never use it.
3.  The client has the same problem
4.  Are you using a CABLE/DSL router?  If so, you really should DISABLE DHCP on it and setup DHCP on the server.  Routers can be difficult to properly configure.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731116
How *I* would set this up:

1. Set the server with a static IP Address, let's go with 192.168.0.254
2. Install Windows DNS (you probably have this done by now, stafi's link details how to do this).
3. DISABLE DHCP on the router.
4. Install DHCP on the server and Authorize it if using a Domain
5. Configure the server's DHCP so that the scope options include:
    A) Gateway of 192.168.0.1
    B) DNS Server 192.168.0.254
    C) DHCP Scope of 192.168.0.50-100
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by:Jay_Jay70
ID: 16731125
i would agree with leew 100% on this, so many problems arise when a server is set with dynamic addresses and DNS configured incorrectly

just my two cents worth
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by:Axter
ID: 16731126
>>The server should be set with a STATIC IP address.

Yes, that's what I would like to do, but unfortunately, by current cable router doesn't support assiging static IP address.
This is one of the reason's I'm trying to create a domain and a DNS, so I can assign static IP address within the local network.
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by:Axter
ID: 16731131
>>You want the server to run your DNS, right?

Yes, the one called David2k3

The R2 machine (davidr2) is the test client machine.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731132
What is the model of the cable/dsl router?  I've never seen one that doesn't permit it.

Worse comes to worse, you can always make the 2000 server your router.  That's what I do.
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by:Axter
ID: 16731134
>>Are you using a CABLE/DSL router?  If so, you really should DISABLE DHCP on it and setup DHCP on the server.  Routers can be difficult to properly configure.

Well that sounds like a great idea, but I'm not sure how to implement it.
I'm a programmer, and my network knowledge is some what limited.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731145
Again:
What is the model of the cable/dsl router?
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by:Axter
ID: 16731146
>>What is the model of the cable/dsl router?  I've never seen one that doesn't permit it.
I now.  I never heard of one until I bought this, and I should have taken it back, but at the time there was no other integrated cable/router/wireless available in my local area.

It's a Linksys WCG200 modal.

>>Worse comes to worse, you can always make the 2000 server your router.  That's what I do.
Would that hurt performance?
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731210
> Would that hurt performance?

Not at all.


As for the Linksys, what version do you have, 1 or 2?  Because you can disable the DHCP server on that model - reference page 22 of your manual.
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by:Axter
ID: 16731249
Just to double check my facts, I went online to the Linksys site, and looked up the manuel for my router, and much to my surprise, there were instructions for setting up a static IP address.
In my previous router, the static IP address was setup by entering the IP address and computer name in the router option settings.
With this box, you don't need to do that, but you must make sure it's an un-assigned address, which I can easily do since I don't have that many machines.

I just setup the static IP address, and the static IP address is working.

However, I still can't get the DNS to work.

I'll continue to read the rest of the recommendations.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16731255
As I think about, don't change any IP address on the router.  I never said that.  You want to DISABLE DHCP on the router, THAT'S ALL

Then you give the server a static IP address and make sure you use it's own static IP as the DNS address as well.
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by:Axter
ID: 16731272
>>3. DISABLE DHCP on the router.

Why do I want to disable DHCP on the router?

If I used this method, does that mean that machines that I don't want to use in the domain will not be able to access the internet?
I have three machines that my family uses for personal use, which I don't want added to the domain, and I want to make sure what ever method I use, doesn't make it so I have to keep my server running all the time in order for those three machines to get online.
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by:Axter
ID: 16731277
>>Then you give the server a static IP address and make sure you use it's own static IP as the DNS address as well.\

I didn't set the IP address on the router.  I set the static IP address on the server.
If I can set the static IP address on the server, does that mean I no longer need to disable the DHCP on the router?
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by:Axter
ID: 16738864
How do you enable the DHCP on the client?
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by:Axter
ID: 16757293
If no further assistance is available for this question, then I'll close it with a B grade.
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by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 16766681
See, I don't think I'm being confusing here, but it seems like you're not listening to what I'm saying or at least taking the time to read it.  For example, I asked you 3 times before "What are your DNS servers set to" before you finally even acknowledged the question.  

Start participating in the question FULLY or I WILL stop participating in the question again.

Now, I actually HAD written something up, but I guess it got lost on my web browser before I could submit it.

I don't know where to begin because you're all over the place... your original question made no mention of keeping your family's computers seperate.  I feel like I have to start over because my mind is scrambled after rereading the history of this comment.

Tell you what... RESTATE the question in this question, provide the details, and I will attempt to answer.  For example, if this is NOT a fair summary, then please come up with one:

I want to setup a domain at home and need to setup a DNS server.  I have a router and also a server and a workstation I use for development.  I want only the server and workstation used in the domain.  My family has several other computers that I do not want part of the domain.  How would DHCP on the router and the server factor in to this?

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by:Axter
ID: 16766744
>>"What are your DNS servers set to" before you finally even acknowledged the question.  

I would have answer your question right away, if you would have said "What are your DNS servers set to, and here's how to get that info".
If you would have said to do a IPCONFIG /ALL from the start, I would have known exactly what you wanted.

I'm not a network expert, or even a good novice, so I need more details as to how to get the information you're asking.


>> your original question made no mention of keeping your family's computers seperate.

I didn't see it as an issue, until you mention disabling the router's DHCP...

>>For example, if this is NOT a fair summary, then please come up with one

Here's a modified version of the summary:
I want to setup a domain and DNS server at home.   I have a router and also a server and *many* workstations I use for development.
I want only the server and the development workstations used with the domain and DNS server.
My family has several other computers that I do not want part of the domain and/or DNS server, and I want them to be able to connect to the internet without having to have the server running.  All computers currently use the router DHCP to connect to the internet.
How would DHCP, DNS, and domain factor in to this with the router and server?




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Lee W, MVP earned 1600 total points
ID: 16766890
Ok, so what you want is two seperate internet connections that presumably share the same internet connection but can otherwise operate independently of each other, right?  One as a domain, the other as a workgroup (though you may not even think of it as such).

The tricky part is how DHCP would be handled.  You have a choice:

1.  set all workstations in the development network OR all workstations for the family to use static addresses.
2.  create a seperate subnet of sorts and have two DHCP servers, one for the family (the router), and one for the development workstations.
3.  set all systems to use DNS statically.  DHCP can still hand out the addresses to everything.

This is seemingly so complicated because a domain and Active Directory in particular relies on DNS so heavily - with misconfigured DNS on a domain workstation, the workstation may not be able to join the domain, may have problems logging on to the domain, or may have problems accessing resources on the domain - so the domain MUST have DNS setup for it in a specific manner.

Technically, there's no reason you can't have the family machines running off the DNS and the DHCP of the server - this WOULD make it simpler.  The only concern is with what would happen if the server went down periodically (don't know how likely this is for your environment).

To do #1:
Pick a group - family or development.  If you chose the family PCs, type "IPCONFIG /ALL" on a command prompt before making any changes - note the DNS servers listed.  Then change the DNS and IP address info to static and enter the DNS addresses from IPCONFIG manually as the DNS servers.  For the IP Address, DO NOT use the one IPCONFIG tells you about - check your router and find out what range it's giving addresses out from (I THINK linksys does 100-200).  Then assign an UNUSED address (from .1-.255) as long as it's not within that range.  For example, .50.   The only thing you have to worry about with this is if the ISP changes the DNS servers - which is VERY unlikely (but not totally impossible).  

If you chose the development workstations, then set those IP Addresses statically the same way, but for DNS enter ONLY the IP Address of the server.

To do #2:
Add a second network card to your server.  Then get yourself a network switch (I'll refer to this as the "development switch" from now on).  Now, leave the router as is and the family PCs as is - nothing to do to them.  Now, connect the server (let's say network card 1, set to obtain an IP Address through DHCP) to the family Router.  Then connect network card 2 to the development switch - setup network card 2 to have a completely STATIC address - and use a different subnet - for example, you previously indicated you use 192.168.0.x - for this second card, use (recommended example - you can use a different number instead of 127 or instead of 1) 192.168.127.1 (subnet mask of 255.255.255.0; leave the default gateway on the second card BLANK - EMPTY - NOTHING IN IT).  Then, setup NAT on the server - Network Address Translation (reference: http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/NAT_Windows_2003_Setup_Configuration.html ).  You have just turned the server into a router. Now setup DHCP - you want to define a scope that includes 192.168.127.100 through 192.168.127.200 (NOTE: there is flexibility in these assignments - but these are my recommendations and how I would likely set things up).  With that scope, you want to define 192.168.127.1 (the server's second network card IP address) as the default gateway.  the subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0, and the DNS servers listed should ONLY be 192.168.127.1 (again the server's IP Address).  Reference http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/DHCP_Server_Windows_2003.html for how to setup a DHCP server in Windows 2003).

To do #3:
forget about the router and DHCP entirely.  Leave it all as is.  just go to every workstation and family member's computers and set the DNS settings statically.  For the domain workstations, the DNS server listed MUST be the IP Address of the Domain Controller (technically the AD DNS server, but that is ALMOST always the domain controller and would be in your case) - NO OTHER DNS SERVERS SHOULD BE LISTED!  Then on all family PCs, type "IPCONFIG /ALL" on a command prompt before making any changes - note the DNS servers listed.  Then change the DNS to static and enter those addresses.  The only thing you have to worry about with this is if the ISP changes the DNS servers - which is VERY unlikely (but not totally impossible).
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by:Axter
ID: 16783113
Thank you for a very thorough  answer.
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