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How do I create a Domain?

How do I create a Domain?
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Axter
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Axter
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2 Solutions
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Do you have a Windows Server - OR A Linux server with SAMBA.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Assuming you have a Windows server, Active Directory is what essentially sets up and creates the domain:
http://www.petri.co.il/how_to_install_active_directory_on_w2k.htm
http://www.petri.co.il/how_to_install_active_directory_on_windows_2003.htm

For Linux, visit www.samba.org
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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>Do you have a Windows Server

I have a windows server
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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>Assuming you have a Windows server, Active Directory is what essentially sets up and creates the domain:

Can my Linux and Solaris computes access the domain if it's setup using Active Directory?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
There are ways of doing it, but I have not explored this for YEARS.  Even then, it would only be for file sharing, authentication, and possibly printer sharing. The more advanced features of Active Directory (Group Policy) simply won't apply to those platforms.
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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>The more advanced features of Active Directory (Group Policy) simply won't apply to those platforms.

I'm not looking for the advance features.  I'm only looking to do file sharing.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Then you have your choice of using the built-in NFS abilities or Windows Server 2003 R2 (not included but downloadable for 2003 pre R2 and 2000  as Windows Services For Unix 3.5) or you can install Samba on the *nix clients and have them access the resources that way.
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bilbusCommented:
if all you need is file sharing ou dont really need the hassle of a domain.

if you have a user named "joe" with a password "password" just make that user/password on both the workstation and server. You will be able to share files jsut fine. domain is over kill
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AxterAuthor Commented:
What's the main benifit of having a domain setup within a network (intranet).
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Jay_Jay70Commented:
the petri links posted above are probably the best and most simple step for domain creation....you cant really get a better guide than them

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/technologies/directory/activedirectory/stepbystep/admng.mspx

thats just some AD management tips
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You said:
> I have not yet recieved a good answer in the original posted question.

You have not provided much feedback to suggest what you are looking for - each response you've posted has been one line of no more than 15 words.

What's the benefit of a domain?  logically grouped, centrally managed computers and users.  

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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>You have not provided much feedback to suggest what you are looking for

Hmmm.
In my other question, in which you participated in, I provide much feedback, and have not gotten a response to my last 4 posted comments.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/Windows_Server_2003/Q_21858522.html

Why would I want to do that again?

I'm an expert in the C++ topic area, and I never let a questioner hang, as I've seen so in the Windows_Server_2003 topic area.

If I feel a questioner has not given enough information, or is asking an ambiguous question, then I ask for clarification, or give the questioner some type of feedback.


>>What's the benefit of a domain?  logically grouped, centrally managed computers and users.
That is not a 500 point answer.
I don't even see that as a 50 point answer, let alone 500 points.
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Jay_Jay70Commented:
security is a massive benefit of a domain environment as well. your abiltity to enforce group policies and standardisation is priceless.

There isnt much more that can be said to the "benefits" of a domain, the short of it is what leew has already posted,

you should look at asking yourself what you want to acheive from a domain environment and then base your question on that :)

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AxterAuthor Commented:
I'm actually looking into setup two completely seperate domains.
One at home, which is mostly for the purpose of sharing files between different operating systems, and that's why I asked about the benifits of having a Domain, since bilbus suggested that having a domain is over kill for that paticular requirement.

The second setup, is at work, where I'm setting up multiple Windows 2003 machines.
There, I do need the domain setup, because I'm trying to setup a MS cluster.
That is, unless someone knows how to setup a MS cluster without using a domain. ???
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Jay_Jay70Commented:
in your home environment i would agree with bilbus

for work, i havent dealt with clustering but from what i know it must be a domain environment

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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Axter, you clearly have knowledge in the areas you know... but I stopped participating in part because I was TIRED of having to draw answers out of you and having you provide incomplete answers when you did respond.  As an expert here, I'm sure you know how important it is for the person(s) asking questions to provide details and explain the goals of what they are doing - without this knowledge, it's very difficult to provide answers and it tends to get frustrating.  

For example, your last comment a few minutes ago should have been the question you first asked!
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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>your last comment a few minutes ago should have been the question you first asked!

As an expert, I also know that sometimes questioners don't really know what is the right question to ask, until they've had some feedback from the experts.
For example, do I even need a domain, is something I didn't even consider, until one of the experts suggested that it's overkill.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
My point is don't just ask how to setup a domain - explain WHY you want to setup a domain.  Then we have a context to help you in.  Without that all we can do is give generic answers.

Having a domain at home is overkill IF you don't already have appropriate licenses and computers to run one.  As a developer, a domain COULD be useful to you.  Domains will provide a central database of users and computers.  Users log on to the computers as a member of the domain and the domain controls access to resources on other members of the domain - this keeps you from having to setup individual user accounts and manually sync passwords on workgroup computers.  In a business environment domains can also implement policies, install software, and allow computers to be managed centrally rather than having to sit at each one to perform administrative tasks.

Problem with Windows is it has never (in my experience) been quick and easy to link to a *nix environment.  To that end, for your home environment, you might be better off getting an external networkable hard drive for shared storage. Normally I do NOT recommend these, but in this circumstance, it's probably best.

For your office, the domain makes more sense.  If you have the software and hardware licenses already, then it's probable that you would want to implement a domain.  It just makes things easier to manage.  BUT, exactly how you implement it depends on what you are trying to accomplish.  If it's just for your cluster, then that's fine, but if you wanted more extensive features, like Exchange, then for a small business, you'd want Small Business Server.

And something I haven't seen mentioned - if you're just trying to do this for builds and tests, why not setup a server with virtual server and do a virtual cluster?
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/virtualserver/deploy/cvs2005.mspx
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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>Having a domain at home is overkill IF you don't already have appropriate licenses and computers to run one.
I have more then enough.
I have three sets MS VC++ 7.1, which each set came one Windows 2000 license and Windows standard 2003 license.
Plus I have additional licenses from my current possition for Windows 2003 R2 and Enterprise.
I also have better computers at home, then I do at work.
I can never understand, why most companies don't mine paying a developer $50 an hour, but can't seem to pay for $100 worth of memory for a computer, which would save many manhours in the long run!


>>If it's just for your cluster,
It's for clusters and for DFS.   I mainly need it for testing file filter drivers.

>>if you're just trying to do this for builds and tests, why not setup a server with virtual server and do a virtual cluster?
Actually, at work, that is exactly what I have, but I didn't want to mention it, because I didn't want to add more confussion to this topic.
I using Microsoft Virtual Server 2005, although it doesn't seem to work that great with R2.  It's very slow, and have problems with mouse control, unless I connect via remote desktop.
The standard and enterprise seem to work OK, but I'm not sure what R2 has that really kills performance on the Virtual Server.  (FYI.. I have 2G memory, and I've tried assigning 512M to the virtual R2 machine , but no difference).
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bilbusCommented:
you need to install the virtual server tools to get the mouse to work right. Its on the server page of the web interface.

You need a ton of memory to make Vserver work right. Also limiting cpu usage per server is a must.

When you say cluster what do you mean, that is a very misunderstood term.

For your doamin you need 2 servers setup for active directory. If i was you i would not install anything else on those 2 servers. Then add more servers for what you want.

I beleve the curent version of samba can interact just fine in a mixed mode NT domain.

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AxterAuthor Commented:
>>When you say cluster what do you mean, that is a very misunderstood term.
Cluster service is a feature that comes with Windows 2003 R2.
See following link:
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/evaluation/overview/technologies/clustering.mspx


>>For your doamin you need 2 servers setup for active directory.

Why is that?
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Jay_Jay70Commented:
Thankyou Axter, i must have missed the last post, the reason for 2 servers/DC's in a domain is for redundancy, one falls down the other one picks up the load, i havent dealt with clustering so can't point anything there
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bilbusCommented:
you should also have two DCs because if AD fails on a single DC and you dont have a good systemstate backup your AD domain is dead.

I had that once i was called into a SBS install where they had a single server and were backing up the files, but not systemstate. When the server crashed they had to start all over. Not that a systemstate would have mattered ... the server was a bookend after a lightning strike
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