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Administrator locks himself out as admin

Hi, on a Win98SE computer of which I at all times have been the only user and have never set up any user account other than just booting up, I have now somehow lost administrative status.  When I boot up, dialog box appears asking for a user name and password.  I have never entered a user name or password that I recall and all I have to do to boot to Win is click "OK" without entering anything in the box.

In Control Panel under "Users" and "Network Connections", and perhaps some others, I can't get them to open, getting only a message stating that the "administrator has restricted use of this ..." or something to that effect.

Question is: how do I re-establish myself as administrator of this computer?

I have had this computer for several years but have others also, and have sort of lost track of how things were in the beginning.  Win98 was pre-installed OEM with recovery disk.  My guess is that applying some "tip" brought this about, but it only  became an issue in attempting to set up a wireless connection with Linksys for DSL sharing, which I was able to do anyway, but I should be able to somehow recover boss status.

Del
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del86
Asked:
del86
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2 Solutions
 
nobusCommented:
Do a search for any *.pwl files, and delete them
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nobusCommented:
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BillDLCommented:
It sounds as though you may have used the Windows 98 Policy Editor (poledit.exe) or merged a *.REG file to your registry that has applied restrictions.  Do you recall using either of these?

Some Windows Error or Informational messages can, as I'm sure you are aware, be rather misleading.  So, the "administrator has restricted use of this ..." message may not be entirely what it seems.  Win98 doesn't really have the same types of security restrictions (access rights) as Windows XP, however it IS possible to end up restricting some of your own normal access by imposing "policies" while messing around with something like the Policy Editor.
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BillDLCommented:
If you can perhaps take note of the exact message being issued on attempting to access these functions, it may help to identify the cause more accurately.
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del86Author Commented:
Two .pwl files: Unknown.pwl in C:\Windows, and Default.pwl in C:\Windows\Options\Cabs.  Have deleted neither yet.

Do not recall using Policy Editor

Three functions under Control Panel are affected, all others seem normal:

Network: "Your system administrator disabled the Network control panel".

User: "Access to this feature has been disabled by a restriction set by your system administrator"

Passwords: "Your system administrator disabled the Passwords Control Panel"
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dbruntonCommented:
Those are registry settings.

One of the settings here I think for the network
http://www.winguides.com/registry/category.php/431/

Might be this one
http://www.winguides.com/registry/display.php/176/


One of the settings here I think for passwords
http://www.winguides.com/registry/category.php/432/

Might be this one
http://www.winguides.com/registry/display.php/181/

Unsure about the User one
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dbruntonCommented:
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del86Author Commented:
Believe you're right about this being a registry issue.  I had, but let expire, a subscription to WinGuides and looked at that to see what tweak I might have inadvertantly applied, but couldn't see anything.  WinGuides doesn't seem to provide a reversing mechanism, however, to un-tweak a tweak.

I'm not a wizbanger on registry stuff so will take some time to effect your suggested changes, so may not get back until Sun or Mon, but am definitely following up on your input.

Thanks
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_Commented:
"Unknown.pwl in C:\Windows" is the one to try.
"Default.pwl in C:\Windows\Options\Cabs" is for the Windows Setup files.
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nobusCommented:
if you do not want to delete them, copy them to another folder. Then delete them.
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BillDLCommented:
Del
>>> "WinGuides doesn't seem to provide a reversing mechanism, however, to un-tweak a tweak". <<<

Those type of restrictions are normally created by the ADDITION of a registry value that wasn't there by default, or simply by changing a Zero value of an existing one to a 1, so they are generally easy enough to reverse manually.

Just be sure to export the respective registry key to an appropriately named *.reg file before changing or deleting a value.  That way, if it messes up something, you can merge it back to the registry by double-clicking on the reg file.  Keep the names of the .reg files to the DOS 8 character maximum so that you can import the file into the registry from DOS without guessing which file is which if the computer fails to boot to Windows after a registry change. Keep separate notes to indicate which reg file relates to which registry change.

Here's the links that I dug up, supplied in addition to the ones provided by dbrunton.  I apologise if any are duplications, but you should be aware that there are differences between "restricting" access to control panel applets, etc, and "hiding" property pages.  It's hard to know, without seeing your registry, which of them may have been applied.

Disable User Profiles:
http://www.winguides.com/registry/display.php/758/
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Network\Logon]
DWord Value Name: UserProfiles
Value Data: 0 = disabled 1 = enabled

Disable Network Control Panel:
http://www.winguides.com/registry/display.php/174/
User Key: [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
System Key: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
DWord Value Name: NoNetSetup
Value Data: 0 = disabled 1 = enabled

The following one may prevent you from bypassing the login dialog by entering a blank password.

Disable Password Caching:
http://www.winguides.com/registry/display.php/124/
User Key: [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
System Key: [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
DWord Value Name: DisablePwdCaching
Value Data: 0 = disabled 1=enabled

Here's the index of winguides section dedicated to Security Restrictions:
http://www.winguides.com/registry/category.php/4/

Index of Security Restrictions > Control Panel:
http://www.winguides.com/registry/category.php/43/

You can download a fully searcheable Windows Help (*.CHM File) version of Regedit online pages and, although it dates back to 2003, it's perfectly adequate for Win98.  You have to install it first from the download, but just do a search for "registry.chm" and copy it out before uninstalling the Windows Registry Guide again.  You then have a standalone help file.
http://www.winguides.com/downloads/registry.exe

If you wish, you can open Regedit and export the following keys to a *.REG file and then copy and paste the details here.  Any restrictions should be apparent to one or more of us, and we can tell you which of the values to change, add, or modify in that file.  You could then merge it back to the registry to remove the restrictions.

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies]
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\NetSetup\Policies]

If you aren't seeing certain Control panel Applets that you know should be there, then you can do either of the following:

1. Open C:\Windows\Control.ini and delete any lines placed under a [don't load] section header which is usually at the top of the file.  A typical entry that hides the ODBC Data Source Administrator applet would show as:

[don't load]
odbccp32.cpl=no

2. Install and use TweakUI to unhide previously hidden control panel applets.
http://ftp.pcworld.com/pub/new/utilities/system_resources_tune_up/tweakui133.exe
Self-Extracting zip file.  Unpack it and then Right-Click > Install on the file "tweakui.INF" to install it as a new Control Panel Applet.
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del86Author Commented:
nobus, I deleted Unknown.pwl in C:\Windows.  I could not see any result from doing so, and on reboot, it was back, although only 1KB instead of the 2KB I deleted.

BillDL, I am trying all the registry changes you listed (not finished), but most are not in my registry.  For example:

Disable User Profile: no DWORD User Profiles
Disable Network Control Panel, all are 1s
Disable Password Caching: no caching DWORD

Re the registry.chm, what do you mean by this: "copy it out before uninstalling the Windows Registry Guide again"?

Re: Tweakui, I did not see anything that allows unhide previously hidden control applets.  What tab is it under?

Thanks for all suggestions, I'm still hacking away.  Before I tried any changes, I made an image file for backup.  Two problems popped up which are slowing me down but were not problems caused by any of this: my computer will not reboot, requires shut off and back on;  trouble with wireless DSL requires use of utility dial up.  Slow doin's.

I've upped the points to keep you guys interested while I hack away.

Del


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nobusCommented:
try running sfc from the run box
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BillDLCommented:
Del
Don't worry about it if a DWord value IS NOT in the registry.  That simply means that the respective restriction has never been created.  IF one or more of those values HAD been present, then the options would have been to eithre delete the value OR set the data value to a zeo or 1 to disable the restriction.  Sometimes they work like a double-negative (for want of a better expression) so you have to look carefully at whether you are enabling or disabling a restriction.  For instance, setting a data value of 1 against a DWord named something like "DontEnableSomething" would have the opposite effect if the DWord was named something like ""DontDisableSomething" or "EnableSomething".

All I meant was that, after installing the Registry Guide 2003, you would find the installed file "registry.chm" that has been installed to your system, and copy it somewhere like your desktop.  Uninstalling the Registry Guide would then delete all the files it installed, but you have a copy of the *.chm file for later use where you won't have to install the registry guide again.  I don't like my Add/Remove programs too cluttered, and see no need to keep things installed where the contents can be used as standalone files.  The "registry.chm" file just gives you a good searchable OFFLINE document.  All of the settings referenced by the links given above can be found in that file without having to be connected to the Internet.
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del86Author Commented:
nobus, what does "sfc" do, or I can look it up.
'
BillDL, sorry I'm a little slow on the uptake here but appreciate and will try to use all the info you provided in some orderly fashion.  I know the solution is in the proper change to some reg entries.  Being extra cautious is all.

Del
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nobusCommented:
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del86Author Commented:
nobus, unless I just read too fast, the scannow feature does not apply to Win98, which is what I'm dealing with.  Nice link though for XP.
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del86Author Commented:
BillDL
>>[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies]
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\NetSetup\Policies]>>

All of above show Name:Default, Value:value not set.

C:\Windows\Control.ini, under [don't load] are the following:
snd.cpl=no
joystick.cpl=no
midimap.drv=no
sticpl.cpl=no

Should I remove those?

For some reason I can not download the registry.exe from the Winguides site or wherever your link takes me [PC Tools]?.  Tried several different computers using dsl and page would not load. Using Firefox, maybe should try IE.

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nobusCommented:
i said to run sfc, not sfc /scannow - but the explanation is valid for most, except forthe registry keys.
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BillDLCommented:
Del
The download link seems to be down, or the file now removed from the server.  I did test its validity before posting.  maybe they reckon it's outdated, or have decided to stop free downloads without registering.

Click the "download" button on the following page for the standalone "registry.chm" file contained in a zip file:
https://filedb.experts-exchange.com/incoming/ee-stuff/141-The_Registry_Guide_2003.zip
(you'll have to log in with your E-E user name and password again).

Re. the control.ini entries.  Don't worry about them.  They aren't related to the inaccessible ones on the problem computer.

snd.cpl = Not a native Win98 system file.  Probably installed by your sound card's driver software.  Probably disabled from within the user options. Most likely used to configure your sound card's options or act as the sound card's own volume control.

midimap.drv = Microsoft Midi-Mapper which seems to configure ports for midi devices and such like.  Interacts with MMSYS.CPL which is the Multimedia Properties control panel applet.

joystick.cpl = self explanatory.  Joystick and Gaming controllers configuration.

sticpl.cpl = Scanners and Cameras control panel applet.  Works along with the Still Image Montitor background process if it is running.

It's a bit disappointing that none of the referenced registry keys contained any "policy" settings.  I had hoped that there might be one or more that could be simply disabled.
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BillDLCommented:
Del
Did you look at the SUB-Keys under each of the registry keys mentioned?

For example under the "network" sub-key as shown below - if it exists:

Registry Keys checked by the "Network" Control Panel applet:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]

Registry Key checked by the "USER" Control Panel function and "Password" Applet:
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System]

Check the values in ALL of the sub-keys of the keys previously given.

Further info about how these Control Panel items exist.

"Passwords" Control Panel Applet
PASSWORDS.CPL
Command to open dialog:
rundll32.exe shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL password.cpl

Files with dependencies.  The two ones at the top are the most unique to this system file.  All the others are used almost constantly by other Windows processes.

NETCP.dll <----------
MPR.dll <------------
KERNEL32.dll
GDI32.dll
USER32.dll
ADVAPI32.dll
COMCTL32.dll

"Network" Control Panel Applet
NETCPL.CPL
Command to open dialog:
rundll32.exe shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL netcpl.cpl

Files with dependencies.

NETDI.DLL <-------- Most unique.
KERNEL.DLL or Kernel32.dll (not sure)
USER.EXE or User32.dll (not sure)

"User" Control Panel Applet
MSLOCUSR.DLL
Command to open the main dialog:
rundll32 mslocusr.dll,AddUserWizard

Watch out for any of these named "dependent" files when running SFC.

It might also help if you try to "register" the following DLL files from the Start Menu's "Run" field as follows:

regsvr32 c:\windows\system\NETCP.dll
regsvr32 c:\windows\system\MPR.dll
regsvr32 c:\windows\system\MSLOCUSR.DLL

I believe that the problems with all three of these files are related to one source, but I have a feeling that the error messages may be misleading us into thinking this is a "policy" restriction rather than a missing, corrupt, or wrong version of a shared file.  If the files loaded by these actions aren't being able to find relevant registry settings or perhaps other dependent system files, then an error like that MIGHT be issued in the absence of one that tells you really what has happened.

Try opening each of the control panel items by pasting the commands above into your Start Menu's "Run" field and see what happens.
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BillDLCommented:
By the way, did you copy out UNKNOWN.PWL to another folder and then delete it as suggested earlier by blue_zee?
Do you ever recall entering "UNKNOWN" as the user name after the first post-install reboot?  It's the only way I could see that this file would be created.

You might as well, while you are at it, try merging the following *.REG file to your registry just in cas there is something wrong with the existing settings.  Copy and paste to Notepad and add two blank lines at the end.  Save as something like PWL_Fix.TXT, then Right-Click > Rename as a *.REG file.  Right-Click the reg file > "Merge", and accept the prompts.

Note: It would be wise to make sure that the two DLL's in the last line do exist before running the reg file.

--------------- start of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) --------
REGEDIT4

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pwl]
@="PWLFile"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile]
@="PWL PassWord List"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\IconHandler]
@="{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\ContextMenuHandlers]
@="PWLMenu"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\ContextMenuHandlers\PWLMenu]
@="{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\PropertySheetHandlers]
@="PWLPage"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\PropertySheetHandlers\PWLPage]
@="{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Shell Extensions\Approved]
"{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"="PWL Shell"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SessionManager\KnownDLLs]
"MPR"="MPR.DLL"
"MSPWL32"="MSPWL32.DLL"


--------------- end of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) --------

You might also like to run regsvr32 and register MSPWL32.DLL as previously described.
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del86Author Commented:
nobus

>>i said to run sfc, not sfc /scannow - but the explanation is valid for most, except forthe registry keys.<<

Will try sfc on W98.  "explanation is valid"--is this my explanation or the explanation on the Iron website?  Not sure of your meaning.

BillDL

>>By the way, did you copy out UNKNOWN.PWL to another folder and then delete it as suggested earlier by blue_zee?
Do you ever recall entering "UNKNOWN" as the user name after the first post-install reboot?  It's the only way I could see that this file would be created.<<

As indicated above, I did that and it had no effect that I could see.  None of the areas mentioned in my question were affected and when I rebooted, the file was back, with 1KB instead of 2KB of the deleted file.   Believe the "Unknown" must have come from some default way back when changing it would have been meaningless because no one else uses my computers.

Downloaded the .chm file as advised on dsl computer and will use floppy to install on W98 which is on dialup and will follow up on other data provided.

Can't thank you enough for all your support.  Wish I was a little further advanced to use it more effectively, but can only struggle and learn.

Del

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del86Author Commented:
Here is some info which I could have presented easier now that I am seeing how some of this registry export etc stuff works.  Have made no changes to registry so far as I know.  By the way, and data exported which does not end up with a change to the registry, can they just be deleted?  No reason to import if not to reverse change, right?

Ran sfc.  Only files needing attention are the following:
naveng.vxd
navex15.vxd
Location: C:\Program Files\Common Files\Symantec Shared\Virus Defs\Bin Hub

Anything in particular in "Settings" or "Advanced" on the program to explore?  I just left the default settings.  Do not have installation disk only Recovery Disk, preinstalled software at purchase.

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies   Quite a few sub keys under this, but mostly "value not set" and only a couple have values but do not appear relative.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies  same as above

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System
Name:NoAdminPage, Data:0x00000000 (0)

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Ratings
Name:WarnOnOff, Data:0x00000001 (1)

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network
NoFileSharingControl   0x00000001 (1)
NoNetSetup             0x00000001 (1)
NoNetSetupIDPage       0x00000001 (1)
NoNetSetupSecurityPage 0x00000001 (1)

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System

NoAdminPage   0x00000000 (0)
NoProfilePage 0x00000001 (1)
NoPwdPage     0x00000001 (1)

Looks interesting, but WTF

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\NetSetup\Policies\Global
MSWEBSVR  "NoFileSharing"
NWSERVER  "NoFileSharing"
VSERVER   "NoFileSharing"

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\NetSetup\Policies\PerUser
MSWEBSVR  "NoFileSharingControl"
NWSERVER  "NoFileSharingControl"
VSERVER   "NoFileSharingControl"
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BillDLCommented:
Hi Del.

First of all, a breakdown of the registry settings you found.  There are a few settings that are DEFINITLY hiding or restricting access to those 3 Control Panel icons.  The fix is very easy.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System
"NoAdminPage"
Enabling this function (Value of 1) stops users from being able to change the remote administration settings for the computer.  This restriction is currently DISabled on your system by virtue of the Zero value.  No problems there.

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network
Network Policies
All are ENabled ie. restrictions are set.
*** Modify their values to Zero ***

"NoFileSharingControl" - Enabling this restriction hides the file and printer sharing controls, stopping users from disabling or creating new file or printer shares.

"NoNetSetup" - Enabling this restriction disables access to the Network Control Panel icon.

"NoNetSetupIDPage" - The Network Identification page include options to set the Computer Name, Workgroup and Description.  Enabling this restriction disables access to the Network ID page.

"NoNetSetupSecurityPage" - The Access Control Page, defines whether the computer support User-Level access or Share-Level access.  Enabling this restriction removes access to the Access Control Page.

Network Policies:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System
*** DISable the ones imposing the restrictions (ie. those with a value of 1) by modifying their values to Zero ***

"NoAdminPage"  - Same as earlier. Restriction is DISabled, so no problems here.

"NoProfilePage" - This is restricting acces to your "Users" Control Panel dialog.  DISable the restriction.
"NoPwdPage" - This is restricting access to your "Passwords" Control panel dialog.  DISable the restriction.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\NetSetup\Policies\Global
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\NetSetup\Policies\PerUser
"NoFileSharing" and "NoFileSharingControl"
I wouldn't worry about these for now.  Just leave them set as they are.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Ratings
Name:WarnOnOff, Data:0x00000001 (1)
I would leave this one as it is set.  I assume it makes sure that a warning is issued when changing Internet Options > Content Advisor.

So the main ones restricting access to the 3 control panel icons are:
"NoProfilePage" - Users
"NoPwdPage" - Passwords
"NoNetSetup" - Network.
Changing their values to a Zero will release the restriction after you reboot.

The results with SFC were good.  I can't recall what the default settings are with SFC, but generally you are looking to set it to
"Always prompt to create backups before replacing files" - Yes
"Check for changed files" - Yes
"Check for deleted files" - Yes
Generally I would copy the log file (C:\Windows\SFCLOG.TXT) to another non-system folder as a backup reference  and then set it to "overwrite log file".

You mentioned earlier about the "unknown.pwl" file:
"Believe the 'Unknown' must have come from some default way back when changing it would have been meaningless because no one else uses my computers".

The problem is that, even where you are the only user of that computer, you will have entered a "user name" when the system booted into Windows after installation.  Even where you left the password field blank and hit Enter, so that the computer just boots right past the login screen every time the system starts, this would have created a *.pwl file named after the User Name you originally entered.

Anyhow, after you release the restrictions on those Control Panel Applets (probably set inadvertantly with the Winguides registry tool) you will be able to see what is going on.

If you copy the following text, paste to notepad, save as something like "RestrictOff.TXT", and then rename as "RestrictOff.REG", then you have a file from which you can modify the three crucial restrictions without messing around in Regedit.  Just double-click the file or Right-Click > "Merge" and follow the prompts. Make sure you leave one or two blank lines after the last line of text in the file or the merging doesn't work.

------------ start of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) ---------
REGEDIT4

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
"NoNetSetup"=dword:00000000

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System]
"NoProfilePage"=dword:00000000
"NoPwdPage"=dword:00000000


------------ end of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) ---------

Regards
Bill

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BillDLCommented:
Look back now to dbrunton's web links to the registry modifications on winguides.com.
That's the ones which were creating the restrictions on your system.
We have just gone about this in a long-handed way by locating and confirming that the restrictions were actually the problem, but nevertheless dbrunton deserves the recognition for identifying the problem at the outset.

Incidentally, change the *.REG file above to the following, or you will still have two disabled tabs in the Network Control Panel dialog.

------------ start of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) ---------
REGEDIT4

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Network]
"NoNetSetup"=dword:00000000
"NoFileSharingControl"=dword:00000000
"NoNetSetupIDPage"=dword:00000000
"NoNetSetupSecurityPage"=dword:00000000

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System]
"NoProfilePage"=dword:00000000
"NoPwdPage"=dword:00000000

------------ end of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) ---------

If that doesn't work, then we will have to consider those GLOBAL settings you detailed at the end of your feedback comment, as they may be overriding your USER restrictions.
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nobusCommented:
sfc is the system file checker for win98, sfc /scannow is the command for the XP version
regarding the files, they belong to Norton Antivirus - you could try uninstalling it for a ttest
naveng.vxd
navex15.vxd
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del86Author Commented:
Bill, if you're still living in Scotland, I have no idea what the time is there, here it's 11:30PM, so will get on this the first opportunity tomorrow.  Thanks for all your work, and being a straight shooter regarding dbrunton.  I did try to follow his input but couldn't have done much without your very thorough input, especially since I would have to use dialup rather than print your stuff and follow through on dsl downloading the registry.chm and various other stuff before working on the W98.  My dialup is very slow.  Anyway..............
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BillDLCommented:
You posted the message at 07.44 GMT, by which time I had been up for a few hours already.
You're welcome, and glad my comments were useful.

Regarding the NAV files that were restored from the Recovery CD (as identified by nobus).  This may well be a red-herring if you have uninstalled Norton Antivirus.  You see, the database of installed files that SFC works from (default file is c:\windows\Default.sfc) was created when Windows was originally installed.  As your Win98 was pre-installed, it probably bundled an old version of NAV that was current at the time, and certain file names were added to the database.

The file database is supposed to be updated when you run Windows Updates, Patches, etc, but it is far from perfect and you invariably are told by SFC about legitimate file that have been modified.  For instance, if you run SFC after updating the originally installed IE5 to IE6, it will usualy report several changed files.  Here's how it is supposed to work.

The SFC baseline file (Default.sfc) maintains the tool's settings and a profile of system files. The baseline contains the following information for each file:

Location it was installed to
Source it was installed from (includes *.CAB file name)
Cyclical Redundancy Checksum (CRC)
Date/Time Stamp
Size
Version

The SFC baseline for the RETAIL version of Windows 98 comes populated with Windows 98 file information. The baseline is backed up and selectively updated during Windows 98 Setup. Running SFC for the first time establishes a profile of the system.

The following files provide the SFC baseline with the default list of files copied by Windows 98 Setup:

Copy.inf
Copy1.inf
Copy2.inf
 
The following files provide SFC with the source for the copied files:

Layout.inf
Layout1.inf
Layout2.inf

As your installation is an OEM version, you will most likely find that those *.INF files have been modified to contain details of extra files not normally installed by a retail version, but for other 3rd-party programs installed as part of the whole customised Win98 setup process.

Windows 98 Setup copies the Default.sfc file to Default.sf0 and then  updates the baseline for files such as Vmm32.vxd that have changeable properties. SFC updates the baseline with changes to the properties for these files without noting the changes in its log file (Sfclog.txt). If a file is missing, it is removed from the baseline.

The Sfcsync.txt file is a list of files to silently update in the SFC baseline during Setup. Sfcsync.txt is limited to the following locations:

Sfcsync.txt   Actual location
-----------   ---------------
10            Windows
11            Windows\System
12            Windows\System\Iosubsys
13            Windows\Command
22            Windows\System\Vmm32
                        
The first time SFC runs, it creates a profile of the system. All of the changes to the baseline are noted in the Sfclog.txt log file, with the exception of missing files.

Missing files are silently removed from the baseline the first time SFC runs, even if you enable notification for missing files. Files that are removed after SFC runs for the first time are identified as missing the next time SFC runs. You are prompted to restore the file if SFC is configured to check for missing files.

Changed files are noted in the log file and you are notified if the setting is enabled. A file is identified as changed if its date and version information changes. Changed files are identified in the Sfclog.txt file as "Updated" unless you enabled notification for changed files and chose to restore the original file.  Files that are overwritten by restored ones are backed up to C:\Windows\Helpdesk\SFC by default.

You are always notified of damaged files. A file is identified as damaged if its date and version match, but the CRC value does not match the baseline.

You are not notified of files that are added to the baseline. Files that are added to the baseline are noted in the log file as "Added".

So, in short, if you have uninstalled NAV from your system, but those files were restored from the recovery CD, then you can probably delete or rename them, run SFC again, and this time click "Ignore" so that SFC doesn't notify you of them again.

I wouldn't worry too much about these files though.
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del86Author Commented:
Bill, implemented your last REGEDIT4 and all restrictions have been lifted, none of the Control Panel applets are restricted.  Good job!

Should I also run the following, which I have not done:

>>You might as well, while you are at it, try merging the following *.REG file to your registry just in cas there is something wrong with the existing settings.  Copy and paste to Notepad and add two blank lines at the end.  Save as something like PWL_Fix.TXT, then Right-Click > Rename as a *.REG file.  Right-Click the reg file > "Merge", and accept the prompts.

Note: It would be wise to make sure that the two DLL's in the last line do exist before running the reg file.

--------------- start of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) --------
REGEDIT4

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pwl]
@="PWLFile"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile]
@="PWL PassWord List"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\IconHandler]
@="{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\ContextMenuHandlers]
@="PWLMenu"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\ContextMenuHandlers\PWLMenu]
@="{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\PropertySheetHandlers]
@="PWLPage"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\PWLFile\shellex\PropertySheetHandlers\PWLPage]
@="{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Shell Extensions\Approved]
"{CBC221A0-EB55-11d1-B1C7-34C304C10000}"="PWL Shell"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\SessionManager\KnownDLLs]
"MPR"="MPR.DLL"
"MSPWL32"="MSPWL32.DLL"


--------------- end of text to copy (DON'T copy this line) --------

You might also like to run regsvr32 and register MSPWL32.DLL as previously described.<<

Finally, for my own info, instead of the REGEDIT4 merge, could I have simply changed the value of each of those sub keys via "modify" one by one instead of the more efficient way you provided, using the normal precautions by exporting each before changing values?  I don't. and don't need to at this time, understand the use of all the 0's to perform the changes.

Del
0
 
BillDLCommented:
That's good news, Del.

*** DON'T *** merge that *.reg file with the registry if everything seems to be OK as you have described.
It was intended (as my "you may as well" suggestion implies) to be used while none of the other suggestions were failing to fix the problem at that stage.

In all probability the referenced keys and values in the reg file are intact in your current registry, or any differences are insignificant as far as the cause of the problem goes.  As long as you can access the "Passwords" control panel settings and see ALL of the property pages (dialogs and tabs), then there is nothing wrong in your registry that the *.reg file may have sorted out.

That .reg file would have restored bad or missing registry entries relating to the various elements of the Password Editor, as far as I could determine.  MSPWL32.DLL contains all the resources that make up the passwords dialog, and MPR.DLL is called by it when run.

Just to briefly explain the significance of the 0x00000000 and 0x00000001 values in the registry.
There are 3 types of values stored in the Windows 98 registry (more types are used in the Windows NT-based registry):
StringValue (REG_SZ)
DWord Value (REG_DWORD)
Binary Value (REG_BINARY)
http://www.winguides.com/article.php?id=1&page=2&guide=registry

With particular reference to the Enable/Disable settings used by the registry, you can think of them as On/Off, Yes/No, Open/Closed, or the binary representation of 1/0.  When you Export to a .REG file, these type of values appear as follows (respectively):

"IsRegistered"="yes"
"IsRegistered"=dword:00000001
"IsRegistered"=hex:01,00,00,00

In Regedit's Right-Hand Pane, these lines would show as follows:

"IsRegistered"                 "yes"
"IsRegistered"                 0x00000001 (1)
"IsRegistered"                 01 00 00 00

Binary patterns are found in electricity flow, etc, and the easiest way to think of it is that a 1 is a pulse and a 0 is nothing, or a 1 = positive, while a 0 = negative, something like that.  So a 1 has a value in a registry binary setting, while a zero means nothing.

Each of those settings given as examples has ENabled (Turned On) whatever the value describes, in this case Yes it is registered, but each has been done in a different way.  To make the setting say No, it isn't registered, the data values would be:

"IsRegistered"                 "no"
"IsRegistered"                 0x00000000 (0)
"IsRegistered"                 00 00 00 00

The number shown in brackets for DWord values is the Decimal equivalent of what is stored as a hexadecimal number.
Hexadecimal counts from 0 to 9 in the same way as Decimal, but then uses the letters A (decimal 10) to F (decimal 15).  After that it gets more complicated, but when you see the letters A to F used in numbers, then you are usually looking at a hex number.

String Values and DWord values are usually used to turn something on or off in this way, while Binary values are usually used to represent much longer or more complex values like this, and should not be tampered with:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\TimeZoneInformation]
"ActiveTimeBias"=hex:c4,ff,ff,ff
""StandardBias"=hex:00,00,00,00
"StandardStart"=hex:00,00,0a,00,00,00,05,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00
"DaylightStart"=hex:00,00,03,00,00,00,05,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00
"DaylightFlag"=hex:02,00,00,00
"ActiveTime"=hex:97,d6,ff,ff

Each of those pairs of numbers can represent a different value used by the system, and you'll nearly always see them given as multiples of 4 pairs.  It's not as easy to "modify" a Binary value in Regedit.  Any actual Value in a REG file will overwrite the existing value in the registry when merged to it, and that's really the only safe way to change a Binary Value if you ever need to do so.

It's probably just as easy to change a simple 0x0000001 (On) DWord value to a 0x0000000 (Off) manually in regedit as it would be to merge a .reg file to the registry.

Hopefully this info isn't totally superfluous to your knowledge needs at this time.
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del86Author Commented:
My head is spinning.  Hope I handled the point stuff properly.

Thanks to all

Del
0
 
del86Author Commented:
No, I can see I didn't.  Can this be fixed?  BillDL should obviously be the Accepted and dbrunton the Assist.  Where do I see the points awarded?

Sorry for the screwup.

Del
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BillDLCommented:
It's not a screw up as far as I am concerned Del, so I'm quite happy as things are and thank you.

dbrunton provided the links to the registry modifications that ultimately released the restrictions.  He wasn't, at that time, aware that you were "not a wizbanger on registry stuff", so I assisted you through methods of verifying whether or not registry settings were the cause.  In so doing, you provided me with the details from your registry that allowed me to create a .REG file which did the trick.  Simple, Accepted Answer to dbrunton, and Assisted Answer to me.

If you really DID want to have a points award changed in a question, then you would do as is the case with anything that needs admin intervention, and post a zero points question in http://www.experts-exchange.com/Community_Support/
You would there quote the url to THIS question, address the question to Administrators, and state your request.

You have asked where you can see the Points Awarded.
Right up at the top, you will see the following:

Title: Administrator locks himself out as admin
asked by del86 on 05/27/2006 12:57AM BST  
This solution was worth  500 Points and received a grade of A.

The way it works is that the number of points allocated to the Accepted Answer, or number of points allocated to each expert if the points were split, is multiplied by a standard multiplier dependent on the grade given.
A guide to grading is provided in the help pages here:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/help.jsp#hi73
The multipliers are shown here:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/help.jsp#hi20

A = 4 times the question points
B = 3 times the question points
C = 2 times the question points
D = the question points (only Moderators and Page Editors can award a D grade)
 
Unfortunately, from what I can see, there isn't a way to see exactly how many points were allocated to each expert in a points split.

There's one thing that might be a good idea for the future, and that is to try and create a standard Win98se installation CD from either (a) your recovery CD OR (b) the setup source files placed on your hard drive by the preinstallation.

There are several ways to do this, and some depend on whether the CD is one that has the same layout as a standard Win98se CD but with extra files used by the OEM to "brand" the installation and install extra programs, or whether it is a Compaq type that conceals and encrypts the contents in a totally different way from a standard Win98se CD.

I would be happy to provide the necessary advice if you choose to try this, but it wouldn't be appropriate to post the details here.  By all means email me (given at the bottom of my profile if you click on my user name) OR simply ask a new question in the Windows 98 Topic area eg. Make a standard setup CD from an OEM Recovery CD and preinstalled OS?

Regards
Bill
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del86Author Commented:
Thanks, Bill, gotta sign off for the night but will consider the creation of a standard Win98se installation CD tomorrow.

Re the points, I assigned 450 to you and 50 to dbrunton so I hope that's the way they got posted, although I couldn't verify that.  I just signed up for six months and was advised to state clearly upfront my skill level, so I'll watch for that and try to avoid any unfairness to those responding.  Guess I'll have to consider myself a novice on this program for a while too.

Del
0
 
BillDLCommented:
Hmmm.  I would have been a bit more reluctant to give your decision the thumbs-up had a seen the points differences.  Maybe it would have been a bit fairer to dbrunton if the points were 250 each, or even 300 : 200.
Just stating this in case dbrunton is too shy to suggest this in his favour ;-)
It's ultimately your decision though, and it's the fixing of the problem that really matters in the end.
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del86Author Commented:
I will ask admin to split the points evenly, and see what happens.  Not my intention to slight anyone and the points, of course, mean nothing to me except a show of appreciation for value received.  If at the very beginning of this long discourse I had responded to dbrunton with "duh?", he may very well have walked me through it in a similar manner to what you did.  We'll never know, but I certainly want to be fair and I suppose I'll learn better how to do that as I become more accustomed to this service and what the participants expect from their efforts in a given situation where others also participate.

Incidentally, if I get the points split evenly, how will you know?  It seems odd that the experts can't determine how many points they receive from a question.

Thanks, Bill

Del
0
 
dbruntonCommented:
No objections to any way you wish to split points.  You can leave as it is or adjust as necessary.  We are only here to help.
0
 
del86Author Commented:
Thanks.  Don't want to beat a dead horse.  Bill gave me some insight on how to apply judgment on points, which I assume are important to this process, and will help in future.  If admin honors my request, points will be split.
0
 
BillDLCommented:
Thank you for that RomMod, and thank you again Del.
0
 
del86Author Commented:
Bill, don't know if this will work, but you mentioned emailing you somewhere up above, but I can't find your email address anywhere and admin can't help.  If it's there, can you point me to it? Or email me at <Removed by Community Support>

Thanks

Del
0
 
BillDLCommented:
Check your inbox, Del.
0
 
BillDLCommented:
RomMod
I acknowledge that liaising by email to resolve a question is not allowed, however this question was already resolved, and the offer to liaise by email with this member was in connection with a separate topic not associated with this question.
It was merely an offer to advise the member whether or not he would be able to create a standard reinstallation CD from a preinstalled/recovery CD setup, and this would have meant the sharing of files which:
(a) would not have been possible from within the E-E pages
(b) would have been far too lengthy a process.

The material comment that spurred this contact, after all matters were resolved in this question had been posted, was:
>>>
"There's one thing that might be a good idea for the future, and that is to try and create a standard Win98se installation CD from either (a) your recovery CD OR (b) the setup source files placed on your hard drive by the preinstallation.  There are several ways to do this, and some depend on whether the CD is one that has the same layout as a standard Win98se CD but with extra files used by the OEM to "brand" the installation and install extra programs, or whether it is a Compaq type that conceals and encrypts the contents in a totally different way from a standard Win98se CD.  I would be happy to provide the necessary advice if you choose to try this, but it wouldn't be appropriate to post the details here.  By all means email me (given at the bottom of my profile if you click on my user name).
<<<

I did not anticipate that the member would post his email as though it was a request for further assistance in relation to the question, and can only apologise.

Bill
0
 
BillDLCommented:
Thanks, RomMod.  I was a bit worried myself when I saw the email address being posted, but your prompt intervention saved me from asking in Community Support for it to be edited out.
Regards
Bill
0

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